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Addiction medicine in Canada: challenges and prospects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134877
Source
Subst Abus. 2011 Apr;32(2):93-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Nady el-Guebaly
David Crockford
Sharon Cirone
Meldon Kahan
Author Affiliation
Addiction Division, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. nady.el-guebaly@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Subst Abus. 2011 Apr;32(2):93-100
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification - methods - standards
Clinical Competence - standards
Clinical Medicine
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Humans
Physicians, Family - education
Psychiatry - education
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - manpower
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
In Canada, the qualification of physicians is the jurisdiction of the College of Family Physicians and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Colleges have promoted the training of "generalists" in family medicine and "sophisticated generalists" among the traditional specialties, and the development of subspecialties has not been encouraged. Nevertheless, due to the increasing number of family physicians and specialists practicing a range of new subspecialties, including addiction medicine, the College of Family Physicians has recognized special interest or focused practices, whereas the Royal College has recognized, in psychiatry, 3 subspecialties (child, geriatric, forensic) requiring an extra year of training and may offer others a diploma recognition. These new opportunities will shape the training requirements of addiction medicine leading to available certification through the International and American Medical Societies of Addiction Medicine.
PubMed ID
21534130 View in PubMed
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Concurrent validity of written and OSCE components of the Canadian dental certification examinations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183772
Source
J Dent Educ. 2003 Aug;67(8):896-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Jack D Gerrow
H Joseph Murphy
Marcia A Boyd
David A Scott
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. jack.gerrow@dal.ca
Source
J Dent Educ. 2003 Aug;67(8):896-901
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification - methods - standards
Clinical Competence
Education, Dental - standards
Educational Measurement - methods - standards
Humans
Licensure, Dental
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the concurrent validity of the National Dental Examining Board of Canada (NDEB) Written Examination and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) by correlating students' scores with their performance in the final year of the D.D.S./D.M.D. program. The subjects of this study were the 2,317 students at nine Canadian dental schools who completed both NDEB examinations between 1995 and 2000. The findings indicate positive correlations (r = 0.43 and r = 0.46, p
PubMed ID
12959163 View in PubMed
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Length of sick leave - why not ask the sick-listed? Sick-listed individuals predict their length of sick leave more accurately than professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70886
Source
BMC Public Health. 2004 Oct 12;4:46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-12-2004
Author
Nils Fleten
Roar Johnsen
Olav Helge Førde
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, N-9037, Norway. Nils.Fleten@ism.uit.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2004 Oct 12;4:46
Date
Oct-12-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Adult
Certification - methods - standards
Comparative Study
Consultants
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
National Health Programs
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The knowledge of factors accurately predicting the long lasting sick leaves is sparse, but information on medical condition is believed to be necessary to identify persons at risk. Based on the current practice, with identifying sick-listed individuals at risk of long-lasting sick leaves, the objectives of this study were to inquire the diagnostic accuracy of length of sick leaves predicted in the Norwegian National Insurance Offices, and to compare their predictions with the self-predictions of the sick-listed. METHODS: Based on medical certificates, two National Insurance medical consultants and two National Insurance officers predicted, at day 14, the length of sick leave in 993 consecutive cases of sick leave, resulting from musculoskeletal or mental disorders, in this 1-year follow-up study. Two months later they reassessed 322 cases based on extended medical certificates. Self-predictions were obtained in 152 sick-listed subjects when their sick leave passed 14 days. Diagnostic accuracy of the predictions was analysed by ROC area, sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio, and positive predictive value was included in the analyses of predictive validity. RESULTS: The sick-listed identified sick leave lasting 12 weeks or longer with an ROC area of 80.9% (95% CI 73.7-86.8), while the corresponding estimates for medical consultants and officers had ROC areas of 55.6% (95% CI 45.6-65.6%) and 56.0% (95% CI 46.6-65.4%), respectively. The predictions of sick-listed males were significantly better than those of female subjects, and older subjects predicted somewhat better than younger subjects. Neither formal medical competence, nor additional medical information, noticeably improved the diagnostic accuracy based on medical certificates. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that the accuracy of a prognosis based on medical documentation in sickness absence forms, is lower than that of one based on direct communication with the sick-listed themselves.
PubMed ID
15476563 View in PubMed
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