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10 years of perioperative nursing certification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170776
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2005 Dec;23(4):18-9, 24-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005

Abdominal wall defects in Denmark, 1970-89.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31708
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Bugge
N V Holm
Author Affiliation
Wilhelm Johannsen Centre for Functional Genome Research, Department of Medical Genetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. MB@IMBG.ku.dk
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - abnormalities
Birth Certificates
Cohort Studies
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology
Gastroschisis - classification - epidemiology
Hernia, Umbilical - classification - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In the last two to three decades, increasing rates of gastroschisis but not of omphalocele have been reported from different parts of the world. The present study represents a register containing 469 children born with abdominal wall defects based on data retrieved from 20 birth cohorts (1970-89) in three nationwide registries. A tentative estimate of the completeness as regards identification of liveborn and stillborn infants is a minimum of 95% and 90% respectively. All cases were reclassified to 166 cases of gastroschisis, 258 of omphalocele and 16 of gross abdominal wall defect. The average point prevalence at birth of gastroschisis was 1.33 per 10 000 live and stillbirths. During the first decade, an increase in prevalence occurred culminating in 1976, followed by a decrease reaching its initial value in 1983 and then a new increase. Overall, no significant linear trend could be demonstrated for the entire period. The average point prevalence at birth for omphalocele was 2.07 and for gross abdominal wall defect 0.12 per 10 000 live and stillbirths with no significant change in the period. The geographical distribution of gastroschisis and omphalocele showed no difference per county.
PubMed ID
11856457 View in PubMed
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Absolute vs relative improvements in congenital diaphragmatic hernia survival: what happened to "hidden mortality".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151056
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):877-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
V Kandice Mah
Mohammed Zamakhshary
Doug Y Mah
Brian Cameron
Juan Bass
Desmond Bohn
Leslie Scott
Sharifa Himidan
Mark Walker
Peter C W Kim
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):877-82
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Death Certificates
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fetal Diseases - surgery
Hernia, Diaphragmatic - congenital - embryology - mortality - surgery
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Selection Bias
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The aim of this study is to determine if there has been a true, absolute, or apparent relative increase in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) survival for the last 2 decades.
All neonatal Bochdalek CDH patients admitted to an Ontario pediatric surgical hospital during the period when significant improvements in CDH survival was reported (from January 1, 1992, to December 31, 1999) were analyzed. Patient characteristics were assessed for CDH population homogeneity and differences between institutional and vital statistics-based population survival outcomes. SAS 9.1 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC) was used for analysis.
Of 198 cohorts, demographic parameters including birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores, sex, and associated congenital anomalies did not change significantly. Preoperative survival was 149 (75.2%) of 198, whereas postoperative survival was 133 (89.3%) of 149, and overall institutional survival was 133 (67.2%) of 198. Comparison of institution and population-based mortality (n = 65 vs 96) during the period yielded 32% of CDH deaths unaccounted for by institutions. Yearly analysis of hidden mortality consistently showed a significantly lower mortality in institution-based reporting than population.
A hidden mortality exists for institutionally reported CDH survival rates. Careful interpretation of research findings and more comprehensive population-based tools are needed for reliable counseling and evaluation of current and future treatments.
PubMed ID
19433161 View in PubMed
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Abuse of alcohol in sudden out-of-hospital deaths in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218488
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Apr;18(2):255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
M. Perola
E. Vuori
A. Penttilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Apr;18(2):255-60
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - mortality
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Death, Sudden - epidemiology - etiology
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Ethanol - pharmacokinetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic - complications - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Alcoholism is known to be greatly underdiagnosed in death certificates, a fact that biases in estimates of alcohol-related mortality. An autopsy series of 1658 cases (920 with natural cause of death and 738 nonnatural) was reviewed to evaluate the extent of this bias, and also to see how well different sources of information served as indicators of alcoholism when alcohol-related disease diagnosed at autopsy was considered as a gold standard. A stepwise logistic regression model adjusted by age and sex showed police reports of individual's alcohol usage and blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of > 2.9/1000 at autopsy to be the two most significant predictors of chronic alcohol abuse (p 2.9/1000), due to its high specificity, as particularly suggestive of chronic heavy drinking. However, it is wise to use these parameters only as an aid in decision-making, not as sole indicators of alcoholism. Deaths associated with chronic heavy drinking were frequent, 50.5% of the total series (male 56.4%, female 37.1%). For all but one age-group (male 45-64 years), however, death certificates mentioned alcohol-related diseases in less than half of these cases. Especially evident underdiagnosis was found for female and males 65 years and older. These results indicate that alcoholism is frequent in such a highly selected population as a series of forensic autopsies and suggest that estimates of prevalence of alcoholism based only on review of death certificates are to be considered with great caution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8048723 View in PubMed
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Access to information for adult adoptees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226501
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 15;144(8):958-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1991
Author
K. Kimbell
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 15;144(8):958-60
Date
Apr-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Adult
Birth Certificates
Canada
Confidentiality
Humans
Records as Topic
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1991 Oct 15;145(8):9231913424
PubMed ID
2009473 View in PubMed
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Accidental deaths and suicides in southwest Alaska: actual versus official numbers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3687
Source
Alaska Med. 1988 Mar-Apr;30(2):45-52
Publication Type
Article

Accuracy and correlates of maternal recall of birthweight and gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85768
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jun;115(7):886-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Adegboye A R A
Heitmann Bl
Author Affiliation
University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Research in Childhood Health, Denmark. aar@ipm.regionh.dk
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jun;115(7):886-93
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth Certificates
Birth Weight - physiology
Child
Denmark
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Mothers - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of maternal recall of children birthweight (BW) and gestational age (GA), using the Danish Medical Birth Register (DBR) as reference and to examine the reliability of recalled BW and its potential correlates. DESIGN: Comparison of data from the DBR and the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS). SETTING: Schools in Odense, Denmark. POPULATION: A total of 1271 and 678 mothers of school children participated with information in the accuracy studies of BW and GA, respectively. The reliability sample of BW was composed of 359 women. METHOD: The agreement between the two sources was evaluated by mean differences (MD), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman's plots. The misclassification of the various BW and GA categories were also estimated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Differences between recalled and registered BW and GA. RESULTS: There was high agreement between recalled and registered BW (MD =-0.2 g; ICC = 0.94) and GA (MD = 0.3 weeks; ICC = 0.76). Only 1.6% of BW would have been misclassified into low, normal or high BW and 16.5% of GA would have been misclassified into preterm, term or post-term based on maternal recall. The logistic regression revealed that the most important variables in the discordance between recalled and registered BW were ethnicity and parity. Maternal recall of BW was highly reliable (MD =-5.5 g; ICC = 0.93), and reliability remained high across subgroups. CONCLUSION: Maternal recall of BW and GA seems to be sufficiently accurate for clinical and epidemiological use.
PubMed ID
18485168 View in PubMed
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[Accuracy in reporting the causes of death. A comparison with diagnosis at autopsy in a series of mesotheliomas and other malignant tumors of the lung].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256107
Source
Can J Public Health. 1971 Sep-Oct;62(5):395-402
Publication Type
Article

864 records – page 1 of 87.