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33 records – page 1 of 4.

The Aboriginal tea ceremony: its relevance to psychiatric practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160645
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;16(2):130-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Ernest Hunter
Author Affiliation
Remote Area Mental Health Service, Queensland Health, Queensland, Australia. Ernest_hunter@health.qld.gov.au
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;16(2):130-2
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Ceremonial Behavior
Culture
Drinking Behavior
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Physician's Practice Patterns
Professional-Patient Relations
Tea
Abstract
To examine the elements of the Aboriginal tea ceremony and its relevance to psychiatric practice.
Through the Aboriginal tea ceremony, the mental health professional is able to convey that care and concern balance experience and expertise. These underpinning principles have wide application.
PubMed ID
17957527 View in PubMed
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Africentric youth and family rites of passage program: promoting resilience among at-risk African American youths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181524
Source
Soc Work. 2004 Jan;49(1):65-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Aminifu R Harvey
Robert B Hill
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Maryland at Baltimore, 21201-1777, USA. Aharvey@ssw.umaryland.edu
Source
Soc Work. 2004 Jan;49(1):65-74
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
African Americans - psychology
Ceremonial Behavior
Child
District of Columbia
Family Therapy
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - rehabilitation
Male
Program Evaluation
Social Identification
Social Work - methods
Abstract
This article examines the effects of an Africentric youth and family rites of passage program on at-risk African American youths and their parents. Data were obtained from a three-year evaluation of a youth rites of passage demonstration project using therapeutic interventions based on Africentric principles. At-risk African American boys between ages 11.5 and 14.5 years with no history of substance abuse were referred from the criminal justice system, diversion programs, and local schools. The evaluation revealed that participating youths exhibited gains in self-esteem and accurate knowledge of the dangers of drug abuse. Although the differences were not statistically significant, parents demonstrated improvements in parenting skills, racial identity, cultural awareness, and community involvement. Evidence from interviews and focus groups suggests that the program's holistic, family-oriented, Africentric, strengths-based approach and indigenous staff contributed to its success.
PubMed ID
14964519 View in PubMed
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An indigenous religious ritual selects for resistance to a toxicant in a livebearing fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140944
Source
Biol Lett. 2011 Apr 23;7(2):229-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-23-2011
Author
M. Tobler
Z W Culumber
M. Plath
K O Winemiller
G G Rosenthal
Author Affiliation
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA. michi.tobler@gmail.com
Source
Biol Lett. 2011 Apr 23;7(2):229-32
Date
Apr-23-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Body Size
Ceremonial Behavior
Drug Tolerance
Female
Humans
Male
Paullinia - toxicity
Poecilia - anatomy & histology - physiology
Religion
Sex Factors
Toxicity Tests
Abstract
Human-induced environmental change can affect the evolutionary trajectory of populations. In Mexico, indigenous Zoque people annually introduce barbasco, a fish toxicant, into the Cueva del Azufre to harvest fish during a religious ceremony. Here, we investigated tolerance to barbasco in fish from sites exposed and unexposed to the ritual. We found that barbasco tolerance increases with body size and differs between the sexes. Furthermore, fish from sites exposed to the ceremony had a significantly higher tolerance. Consequently, the annual ceremony may not only affect population structure and gene flow among habitat types, but the increased tolerance in exposed fish may indicate adaptation to human cultural practices in a natural population on a very small spatial scale.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20826470 View in PubMed
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Athletes confessions: the sports biography as an interaction ritual.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268576
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015 Apr;25(2):280-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
L F Thing
L T Ronglan
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015 Apr;25(2):280-8
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletes - psychology
Bicycling - psychology
Biography as Topic
Ceremonial Behavior
Denmark
Doping in Sports - psychology
Emotions
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Sports - psychology
Abstract
Commercialization of emotions is not a new phenomenon but in Denmark there is a new general trend to tell and sell personal stories in the media. Personal deprivation and crises are also major topics in sports media. This paper focuses on sports biographies as a book genre that is reviving in popularity. The paper approaches the topic through the biographies of one Danish athlete: the former professional cyclist, Jesper Skibby, who writes about his doping disclosure and shares his personal dilemmas as a former elite sportsman. The thematic text analysis orientates around social interactions, emotions, and personality constructions. Inspired by microsociology with a Durkheimian flavor of Goffman and Hochschild, themes including "face work," "interaction rituals," and "emotions management" are discussed. The analysis claims that sharing personal information in the media is not only a means of confession and reclaiming status but is also business and management - on an intimate level. Telling the story of the corrosion of a sporting character has become a hot issue, an entertainment, and not least a commercial commitment.
PubMed ID
24673745 View in PubMed
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A case of zootherapy with the tarantula Brachypelma vagans Ausserer, 1875 in traditional medicine of the Chol Mayan ethnic group in Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135771
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2011;7:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Salima Machkour-M'Rabet
Yann Hénaut
Peter Winterton
Roberto Rojo
Author Affiliation
Laboratorio de Bioconservación ante el Cambio Global, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Av. del Centenario Km. 5.5, C.P. 77900, Chetumal, Quintana Roo, Mexico. smachkou@ecosur.mx
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2011;7:12
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Asthma - therapy
Beverages
Ceremonial Behavior
Chest Pain - therapy
Cough - therapy
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Mexico
Spider Venoms - therapeutic use
Spiders
Abstract
In practically every human culture, the use of arthropods as medicinal resources has been reported. In Mexico, the Mayan people mainly use plants but occasionally also animals and minerals in their medicine. This article is the first to report the traditional use of the tarantula Brachypelma vagans by medicine men in the Chol community, an ancient indigenous group that inhabits the southeastern part of Mexico. We also describe the utility of such arachnids in traditional medicine.
This study was carried out in different Chol communities in the states of Chiapas and Campeche (southeastern Mexico) from 2003 until 2007. We interviewed the local medicine men, patients and non-Chol people in each village visited to collect information about the rituals involved and the effectiveness of this traditional medicine and also their opinion of this traditional medicine.
In all independent villages, the people who present an illness called 'aire de tarantula' or tarantula wind with symptoms including chest pain, coughing and asthma, were treated by the medicine man (called 'hierbatero') with a tarantula-based beverage. From village to village, the beverage has a similar base composition but some variations occur in additional ingredients depending on the individual medicine man. Like in all traditional Mayan medicine, the ritual of the ceremony consists of drinking the tarantula-based beverage and this is principally accompanied by chants and burning of incense.
The recipe of the tarantula-based beverage and the procedure of this ritual ceremony were fairly constant in all the villages visited. Our work shows that despite the tarantula's bad image in several cultures, in others positive use is made of these spiders, as in modern medicine.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21450096 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2007 Sep;25(3):6-8, 10-1, 13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Chris Downey
Author Affiliation
Perioperative Services, Kingston General Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2007 Sep;25(3):6-8, 10-1, 13
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beneficence
Canada
Ceremonial Behavior
Empathy
History, 20th Century
Humans
Mathematics - history
Nurse's Role - history
Operating Room Nursing - history
Safety Management - history
Surgical Instruments - history
Surgical Sponges - history
Abstract
Perioperative nurses have developed specific expert nursing care practices. "Counting as caring" is certainly an approach in keeping with the perioperative nurse's guiding principle of beneficence (to do no harm). This article takes a retrospective look, from the first half of the last century through into the late 1960s, at the practice of counting and the influences that have changed it.
PubMed ID
17958054 View in PubMed
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A critical evaluation of reports associating ayahuasca with life-threatening adverse reactions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108281
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2013 Apr-Jun;45(2):179-88
Publication Type
Article
Author
Rafael Guimaraes dos Santos
Author Affiliation
International Center for Ethnobotanical Education, Research & Service, Nieuwe Zandstraat 4, 4661 AP Halsteren, The Netherlands. banisteria@gmail.com
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2013 Apr-Jun;45(2):179-88
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Banisteriopsis
Ceremonial Behavior
Cultural Characteristics
Ethnobotany
Female
Hallucinogens - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Plant Preparations - adverse effects
Plants, Medicinal
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Ayahuasca is a botanical hallucinogenic preparation traditionally consumed by Northwestern Amazonian indigenous groups. Scientific evidence suggests good tolerability after acute administration of ayahuasca and also after years or even decades of its ritual consumption. Nevertheless, some scientific and media reports associate ayahuasca or some of its alkaloids with severe intoxications. The purpose of the present text is to do a critical evaluation of these reports. The evaluation of the cases highlights the fact that some lack accurate forensic/toxicological information, while others are not directly relevant to traditional ayahuasca preparations. These limitations reduce the possibility of an accurate risk assessment, which could indicate potential contraindications and susceptibilities for ayahuasca consumption. Nevertheless, even with these limitations, the cases suggest that previous cardiac and hepatic pathologies and current use of serotonergic drugs/medications are contraindications to ayahuasca use, and that caution should be taken when using different botanical species and extracted/synthetic alkaloids to prepare ayahuasca analogues.
PubMed ID
23909005 View in PubMed
Less detail

Culture is treatment: considering pedagogy in the care of Aboriginal people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143248
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2010 Jul;48(7):27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Brenda L Green
Author Affiliation
Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan, First Nations University of Canada, Community Development and Health Sciences, 1301 Central Avenue, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan S6V4W1, Canada. bgreen@firstnationsuniversity.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2010 Jul;48(7):27-34
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ceremonial Behavior
Cultural Characteristics
Culture
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Healing
Metaphysics
Sick Role
Social Support
Spirituality
Transcultural Nursing - education
Abstract
This article presents an overview of culture as treatment, by recognizing the impact that culture has on treatment along with the specific rituals, customs, and meanings related to healing. Attention must be given to the Aboriginal heritage, including various concepts of metaphysics, spirituality, medicines, government, oral history, and language. A pedagogical underpinning of illness and healing is better cared for through cultural messaging and learning that is related to the complex historical legacy of Aboriginal societies, and therefore, culture provides important diverse contributions to current treatment and wellness programs.
PubMed ID
20506971 View in PubMed
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[Danish physicians should not contribute to ritual circumcision of underage boys].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268620
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Aug 26;175(35):1939
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2013
Author
Morten Frisch
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Aug 26;175(35):1939
Date
Aug-26-2013
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ceremonial Behavior
Child
Circumcision, Male - ethics
Denmark
Humans
Male
Physicians - ethics
Religion and Medicine
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Sep 16;175(38):220526495496
PubMed ID
23978113 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.