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947 records – page 1 of 95.

[10-year monitoring of morbidity, mortality and lethality from myocardial infarct and stroke]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55059
Source
Ter Arkh. 1993;65(4):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
V V Gafarov
N G Kozel
I A Arkhipenko
N S Khrushcheva
S V Voitsitskaia
V L Feigin
T E Vinogradova
Source
Ter Arkh. 1993;65(4):9-13
Date
1993
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - mortality
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The data on the studies using WHO programs "Register of Acute Myocardial Infarction", "Register of Brain Apoplexy", "MONICA" in one of the districts of Novosibirsk have been pooled and analyzed. The studies have established objective trends in the incidence, mortality, lethality of myocardial infarction and brain apoplexy in the population aged 25-64 for 10 years.
PubMed ID
8059418 View in PubMed
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1913 men study - a longitudinal study of the development of stroke in a population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250389
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1977;14:122-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
R. Adolfsson
K. Svärdsudd
G. Tibblin
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1977;14:122-7
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Blood Sedimentation
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk
Smoking
Abstract
Risk factors for the development of stroke was studied in a prospective long-term investigation of 855 male in a random population sampled of the same age. After 13 years of follow-up 25 participants had suffered from stroke, which gives an incidence of 19/10,000 annually. At the 1963 year investigation several parametras were studied. The stroke-prone person had higher values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and had a significant greater total heart volume. Blood parametras as the fasting of serum cholesterole, triglyceride and erytrocyte sedimentation rate were significantly elevated in those who developed stroke. They also tended to consume more coffee and showed a higher tobacco consumption. By applying the multiple regression model it was disclosed that the most predective risk-variables were diastolic blood pressure, erytrocyte sedimentation rate and smoking habits.
PubMed ID
298994 View in PubMed
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The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part II - Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168976
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
N A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Simon W Rabkin
Raj Padwal
Ross D Feldman
Norman Rc Campbell
Lawrence A Leiter
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Michael D Hill
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Tavis S Campbell
Carol Herbert
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Ellen Burgess
B. Hemmelgarn
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Robyn Houlden
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques Dechamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Sheldon Tobe
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcohol Drinking
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - therapy
Kidney Diseases - therapy
Life Style
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Myocardial Ischemia - therapy
Patient compliance
Potassium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. For lifestyle interventions, blood pressure (BP) lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week in men or nine standard drinks per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management in selected individuals. Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. BP should be lowered to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (regardless of the degree of proteinuria). Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve these target BPs. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in nonblack patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jan 21;367(9506):209; author reply 21016427487
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: Am J Med. 2001 Nov;111(7):553-811705432
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Cites: J Hypertens. 2003 Jun;21(6):1055-7612777939
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Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jun 19;363(9426):2022-3115207952
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1997 Oct;10(10 Pt 1):1097-1029370379
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Oct 24;352(9137):1347-519802273
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Cites: Stroke. 2005 Jun;36(6):1218-2615879332
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 27;165(12):1401-915983290
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-7216003449
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Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2000 Apr;20(4):410-610772372
PubMed ID
16755313 View in PubMed
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The 20210 A allele of the prothrombin gene is not a risk factor for juvenile stroke in the Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33554
Source
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 1998 Oct;9(7):663-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
M. Gaustadnes
N. Rüdiger
J. Ingerslev
Source
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 1998 Oct;9(7):663-4
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Cerebrovascular Disorders - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Mutation
Prothrombin - genetics
Risk factors
Notes
Comment On: Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 1998 Mar;9(2):209-109622222
PubMed ID
9863718 View in PubMed
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Abdominal adipose tissue distribution, obesity, and risk of cardiovascular disease and death: 13 year follow up of participants in the study of men born in 1913.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55732
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 May 12;288(6428):1401-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-1984
Author
B. Larsson
K. Svärdsudd
L. Welin
L. Wilhelmsen
P. Björntorp
G. Tibblin
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 May 12;288(6428):1401-4
Date
May-12-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adipose Tissue
Aged
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Body Composition
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
In a prospective study of risk factors for ischaemic heart disease 792 54 year old men selected by year of birth (1913) and residence in Gothenburg agreed to attend for questioning and a battery of anthropometric and other measurements in 1967. Thirteen years later these baseline findings were reviewed in relation to the numbers of men who had subsequently suffered a stroke, ischaemic heart disease, or death from all causes. Neither quintiles nor deciles of initial indices of obesity (body mass index, sum of three skinfold thickness measurements, waist or hip circumference) showed a significant correlation with any of the three end points studied. Statistically significant associations were, however, found between the waist to hip circumference ratio and the occurrence of stroke (p = 0.002) and ischaemic heart disease (p = 0.04). When the confounding effect of body mass index or the sum of three skinfold thicknesses was accounted for the waist to hip circumference ratio was significantly associated with all three end points. This ratio, however, was not an independent long term predictor of these end points when smoking, systolic blood pressure, and serum cholesterol concentration were taken into account. These results indicate that in middle aged men the distribution of fat deposits may be a better predictor of cardiovascular disease and death than the degree of adiposity.
PubMed ID
6426576 View in PubMed
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[ABDOMINAL PURPURA COMBINED WITH CEREBRAL SYNDROME IN CAPILLARY TOXICOSIS.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45494
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1963;71:23-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
K I FELDMAN
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1963;71:23-4
Date
1963
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen, Acute
Appendectomy
Capillaries
Cerebrovascular disorders
Child
Purpura
Vascular Diseases
PubMed ID
14108099 View in PubMed
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[A cerebrovascular unit. Experiences after 8-years of activity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223602
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jun 10;112(15):1974-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-1992
Author
T. Dahl
P M Sandset
U. Abildgaard
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Aker sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jun 10;112(15):1974-6
Date
Jun-10-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Hemorrhage - diagnosis - mortality - rehabilitation
Cerebral Infarction - diagnosis - mortality - rehabilitation
Cerebrovascular Disorders - diagnosis - mortality - rehabilitation
Hospital Units - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - diagnosis - mortality - rehabilitation
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Abstract
The authors review experience gained from developing and running a non-intensive stroke unit during the years 1983-91. The number of patients treated per year has increased from 65 to 149. The average length of stay in hospital has dropped from 21 to 15 days. About 87% of the patients had verified stroke, 7% had transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Other intracranial diseases were found in 3.3%. The mortality rate was low (5%) 48% of the patients were transferred to a rehabilitation centre, 37% were discharged to their homes, with or without out-patient care, and 10% were discharged to nursing homes. Early and systematic investigations and multi-disciplinary rehabilitation in a specialized stroke unit increases the quality of care for patients suffering from stroke. A shorter stay in hospital gives a bonus in the form of reduced health expenditures.
PubMed ID
1509463 View in PubMed
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Acetylsalicylic acid in the prevention of stroke in patients with reversible cerebral ischemic attacks. A Danish cooperative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242546
Source
Stroke. 1983 Jan-Feb;14(1):15-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
P S Sorensen
H. Pedersen
J. Marquardsen
H. Petersson
A. Heltberg
N. Simonsen
O. Munck
L A Andersen
Source
Stroke. 1983 Jan-Feb;14(1):15-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aspirin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cerebrovascular Disorders - drug therapy
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Platelet Aggregation - drug effects
Random Allocation
Time Factors
Abstract
Two hundred and three patients, 148 males and 55 females, who during the last month before admission had experienced at least one reversible cerebral ischemic attack of less than 72 hours duration, were randomly assigned to treatment with either acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 1000 mg daily (101 patients) or placebo (102 patients). The average follow-up period was 25 months. The two treatment groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, associated diseases, risk factors, number and duration of cerebral ischemic attacks. No statistically significant differences were found between the treatment groups as to the primary end point: stroke or death (ASA group 20.8%, placebo group 16.7%). Occurrence of transient ischemic attacks during the treatment period was not reduced by ASA treatment, whereas there was a trend suggesting fewer myocardial infarctions in the ASA group (5.9%) than in the placebo group (13.7%). The difference, however, was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). We were thus unable to demonstrate any favorable influence of ASA 1000 mg daily in patients with reversible ischemic attacks. This study does not, of course, prove that ASA treatment is ineffective in stroke prevention.
PubMed ID
6337425 View in PubMed
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947 records – page 1 of 95.