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163 records – page 1 of 17.

Age-period-cohort effects on stroke mortality in Sweden 1969-1993 and forecasts up to the year 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210785
Source
Stroke. 1996 Nov;27(11):1981-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
M. Peltonen
K. Asplund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. markku.peltonen@medicin.umu.se
Source
Stroke. 1996 Nov;27(11):1981-5
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Variations in stroke mortality could be explained by changes in factors that act around the time of death (period effect) and by risk factors that are present in early life (cohort effect). The aim of this study was to analyze mortality rates for stroke in Sweden during the period 1969 through 1993 and to predict mortality trends until the year 2003, taking into account age, cohort, and period effects.
Age-period-cohort models were used to analyze stroke mortality in Sweden between 1969 and 1993 and to predict age-specific death rates and total number of deaths for the periods 1994 through 1998 and 1999 through 2003.
Mortality rates in the age group 25 to 89 years decreased from 203 to 143 per 100,000 for men and from 185 to 113 per 100,000 for women over the study period (average annual decrease of 1.3% for men and 1.9% for women). The decline was present in all age groups. The full age-period-cohort model provided an acceptable fit in both sexes. Predictions based on these models gave a mortality rate of 122 and 92 per 100,000 for the period 1999-2003 in men and women, respectively. Despite an aging and increasing population, the total number of stroke deaths in Sweden is predicted to decline by approximately 10% in both men and women from 1989-1993 to 1999-2003.
Both factors, cohort and calendar period, contain relevant information to explain the decline in stroke mortality trends in Sweden. Predictions indicate that the decline of both age-specific and total mortality will continue.
PubMed ID
8898802 View in PubMed
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Agreement on disease-specific criteria for do-not-resuscitate orders in acute stroke. Members of the Canadian and Western New York Stroke Consortiums.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212814
Source
Stroke. 1996 Feb;27(2):232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
A V Alexandrov
P M Pullicino
E M Meslin
J W Norris
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Buffalo General Hospital, State University of New York, USA.
Source
Stroke. 1996 Feb;27(2):232-7
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Brain Damage, Chronic
Brain diseases
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality - nursing - physiopathology
Consensus
Ethics, Medical
Ethics, Nursing
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
New York
Patient care team
Patient Selection
Physicians
Professional-Family Relations
Prognosis
Resuscitation Orders
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
The do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order is a mechanism of withholding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The lack of DNR guidelines specific for acute stroke may result in many stroke patients receiving unnecessary and futile resuscitation and ventilator-assisted breathing.
A prospective multicenter evaluation of disease-specific criteria for DNR orders in acute stroke was initiated using a modified Delphi process. The participants were the Canadian and Western New York Stroke Consortium members who are closely involved in caring for acute stroke patients and conducting clinical trials at the academic centers. Previously published provisional criteria were reviewed by the participants. Modifications were made to the criteria until statistically significant agreement (P
PubMed ID
8571415 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and stroke mortality. 20-year follow-up of 15,077 men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11349
Source
Stroke. 1995 Oct;26(10):1768-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
H. Hansagi
A. Romelsjö
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
S. Andréasson
A. Leifman
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Psychiatric Clinic for Alcohol and Drug Dependence, St Göran's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Stroke. 1995 Oct;26(10):1768-73
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Brain Ischemia - mortality
Cerebral Hemorrhage - mortality
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Cohort Studies
Ethanol - administration & dosage - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance
Twin Studies
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Since stroke is a principal cause of death in elderly people, we analyzed the association between alcohol and stroke mortality in a cohort of 15,077 middle-aged and older men and women. METHODS: Data on alcohol habits were obtained from a questionnaire in 1967. The subsequent 20 years yielded 769 deaths from stroke, of which 574 were ischemic. Relative mortality risks (RR) were estimated from logistic regression analyses with lifelong alcohol abstainers as a reference group. Adjustments were made for age and smoking. RESULTS: No association was found between alcohol intake and hemorrhagic stroke. An elevated risk of ischemic stroke was found for men who drank infrequently, that is, a few times a year or less often (RR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 3.2), for those who were intoxicated now and then (RR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.8), and for those who reported "binge" drinking a few times in the year or less often (RR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5). Among women only ex-drinkers had an elevated risk of dying of ischemic stroke (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5 to 7.2). The risk was reduced for women who had an estimated average consumption of 0 to 5 g pure alcohol per day (RR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.8); for those who did not drink every day (RR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9); and for those who never "went on a binge" (RR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.8) or became intoxicated (RR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9). CONCLUSIONS: Drinking habits were associated only with deaths from ischemic stroke, and the risk patterns were different for men and women. In analyses, ex-drinkers should not be included with lifelong abstainers, since the former tend to run high health risk.
PubMed ID
7570723 View in PubMed
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An investigation of the effect of regional variation in the treatment of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55437
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1989;28(2):131-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
T. Christiansen
K M Pedersen
B. Harvald
K. Rasmussen
J. Jørgensen
C. Svarer
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Finance and Policy, Odense University, Denmark.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1989;28(2):131-9
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Denmark
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - economics - mortality
Male
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
Over a period both a monetary and physical measure of antihypertensive drug consumption has increased in Denmark, but the consumption has varied considerably between counties in any given year. Concurrently, SMR for myocardial infarctions and cerebrovascular diseases due to hypertension has declined. The relation between intensity of treatment and outcome in terms of reduced loss of life time or healthy time is analyzed at an aggregate level within a health economic framework. The relation is analyzed by using a pooled time series cross section regression analysis. Two models, a covariance and an error component model are used. Within the range of observed drug consumption, loss of life years and loss of good health show a tendency towards negative regression on consumption of drugs when controlled for relevant variables such as occupational structure, degree of urbanization, and hardness of the drinking water.
PubMed ID
2928822 View in PubMed
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Antiplatelet treatment in elderly people with transient ischaemic attacks or ischaemic strokes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216010
Source
BMJ. 1995 Jan 7;310(6971):25-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-1995
Author
J. Sivenius
P J Riekkinen
M. Laakso
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Kuopio, University Hospital, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1995 Jan 7;310(6971):25-6
Date
Jan-7-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality - prevention & control
Dipyridamole - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - drug therapy - mortality
Middle Aged
Notes
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1993 Jan;87(1):1-88424306
PubMed ID
7827549 View in PubMed
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[Apoplexy units--reduced mortality, need for nursing homes, length of stay and cost savings]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48270
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Aug 26;158(35):4894-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1996
Author
H S Jørgensen
H. Nakayama
H O Raaschou
K J Larsen
P. Hübbe
T S Olsen
Author Affiliation
Bispebjerg Hospital, København, neurologisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Aug 26;158(35):4894-7
Date
Aug-26-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality - rehabilitation - therapy
Cost Savings
Denmark
English Abstract
Hospital Units - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Nursing Homes - utilization
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Treatment of stroke patients on specialised stroke units has become more frequent, yet the effect of this treatment has not been determined. In this prospective, community-based study of 1241 unselected acute stroke patients we compared outcome between patients geographically randomised to treatment on a stroke unit or a general neurological/medical ward, from the time of acute admission to the end of rehabilitation. Baseline characteristics were comparable between the two treatment groups regarding age, sex, marital status, prestroke residence, and stroke severity. The patients treated on the stroke unit had higher comorbidity with regard to hypertension and diabetes. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were applied to estimate the independent influence of stroke unit treatment on outcome. Stroke unit treatment significantly reduced in-hospital mortality (OR 0.50), case-fatality rate (OR 0.45), 6-month mortality (OR 0.57), 1-year mortality (0.59, and discharge rate to a nursing home (OR 0.61). The relative chance of being discharged to own home was almost doubled (OR 1.9), and the length of hospital stay reduced by 30% in patients treated on the stroke unit, P
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Apr 21;159(17):2570-19182390
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Feb 10;159(7):965-69054092
PubMed ID
8801694 View in PubMed
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Are geographical differences in cardiovascular mortality due to morbidity differences or to methodological differences? The project "myocardial infarction in Mid-Sweden".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55229
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1991 Sep;19(3):154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
C. Nerbrand
K. Svärdsudd
L G Hörte
G. Tibblin
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Department of Family Medicine, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1991 Sep;19(3):154-61
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Coronary Disease - mortality
Death Certificates
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Geographical variations in cardiovascular mortality have been reported from Mid-Sweden. IHD mortality for men aged 45-64 was 60% higher in the western part than in the east. Mortality from stroke for men aged 45-74 was 73% higher on the west. Similar differences were found for women. One possible explanation could be that there are no incidence differences but that the mortality differences are due to different survival rates or to differences certifying the cause of death. These two possible explanations were tested in this study. Data for all patients hospitalised during the 10-year period 1972-1981 for myocardial infarction or stroke in a high mortality area, the County of Värmland in the west, and a low mortality area, the County of Uppsala in the east, were collected. In addition, a substudy was performed where the basis for the death certificate diagnosis was studied. The western area generally had a higher case fatality rate than the eastern. However, a larger proportion of the deaths the eastern area, occurred outside hospital, so that the net effect would be that the differences found were not large enough to explain the mortality differences. The autopsy rate in the western part was lower than in the east but since a larger proportion of the deaths occurred in hospital the rank order for IHD and stroke mortality between east and west was the same whether all IHD or stroke deaths were counted or only those considered the most well documented.
PubMed ID
1796247 View in PubMed
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Arsenic exposure and mortality: a case-referent study from a Swedish copper smelter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27598
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1978 Feb;35(1):8-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1978
Author
O. Axelson
E. Dahlgren
C D Jansson
S O Rehnlund
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1978 Feb;35(1):8-15
Date
Feb-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arsenic - adverse effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - mortality
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Sweden
Abstract
An increased mortality from lung cancer, cardiovascular disease, haematolymphatic malignancy and cirrhosis of the liver has been reported among smelter workers and others exposed to arsenic. This study uses the case-referent (case-control) technique and is concerned with workers in a copper smelter in a complex work environment, characterised by the presence of trivalent arsenic in combination with sulphur dioxide and copper, and also with other agents. Lung cancer mortality was found to be increased about five-fold and cardiovascular disease about two-fold, showing a dose-response relationship to arsenic exposure. Mortality from malignant blood disease (leukaemia and myeloma) and cirrhosis of the liver was also slightly increased. This mortality pattern among the smelter workers is consistent with earlier reports. An increased mortality from cardiovascular disease in this type of industry is of particular interest as it has been reported only once before.
PubMed ID
629894 View in PubMed
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163 records – page 1 of 17.