Skip header and navigation

Refine By

45 records – page 1 of 5.

Abundance of the longer A beta 42 in neocortical and cerebrovascular amyloid beta deposits in Swedish familial Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211852
Source
Neuroreport. 1996 May 31;7(8):1377-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-31-1996
Author
R N Kalaria
D L Cohen
B D Greenberg
M J Savage
N E Bogdanovic
B. Winblad
L. Lannfelt
A. Adem
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.
Source
Neuroreport. 1996 May 31;7(8):1377-81
Date
May-31-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - genetics - metabolism
Amyloid beta-Peptides - analysis - genetics
Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor - genetics
Cerebral Cortex - chemistry
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Down Syndrome - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Middle Aged
Mutation
Nerve Tissue Proteins - analysis - genetics
Periodicity
Sweden
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the deposition of amyloid beta (A beta) protein with carboxyl- and aminoterminal heterogeneity in cortical and cerebrovascular deposits of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using carboxyl end-terminal specific antibodies to A beta peptides, we examined the immunocytochemical distribution of A beta 40 and A beta 42 species in brain tissue from a Swedish subject with familial AD (FAD) bearing the double mutation at codons 670/671 in the amyloid beta precursor protein (A beta PP), and from subjects with Down's syndrome and sporadic AD. In the Swedish subject, we found profound parenchymal A beta deposits and cerebral amyloid angiopathy in all four cortical lobes and cerebellum. A beta 42 was evident in almost all parenchymal deposits as well as many vascular deposits. Although A beta 40 was present in meningeal and intraparenchymal vessels, deposits containing this shorter peptide reactivity were sparse. Surprisingly, our observations in Swedish FAD showing a remarkable abundance of A beta 42 in both parenchymal and vascular deposits were qualitatively similar to the Down's syndrome and most sporadic AD cases, and to previously published A beta PP717 FAD. While previous transfection studies in different cell cultures indicate substantially increased soluble A beta production and A beta 40 species to be predominant, it would appear that the double A beta PP mutations in Swedish FAD largely result in the deposition of the longer A beta 42 in vivo.
PubMed ID
8856679 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Age dynamics and seasonal variations of parameters of cerebral circulation in children and adolescents from European north].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261044
Source
Ross Fiziol Zh Im I M Sechenova. 2014 Oct;100(10):1204-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
S I Soroko
V P Rozhkov
Source
Ross Fiziol Zh Im I M Sechenova. 2014 Oct;100(10):1204-19
Date
Oct-2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging - physiology
Arctic Regions
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Russia
Seasons
Abstract
Age dynamics and seasonal variations in cerebral blood flow was studied by means of transcranial Doppler in 95 the natives of the Arkhangelsk region school students aged 7 to 18 years. The results of longitudinal (from 2005 to 2014) study of students are presented. The linear blood flow velocity (BFV) showed gradual declining from junior to senior school age, and BFV were in the middle cerebral artery below average, and in the basilar artery--above mid latitude standards. The influence of the seasonal factor is more pronounced in the younger (for boys) and intermediate (for girls) age group and leveled in the older group. The largest seasonal changes were obtained in BFV in carotid arteries, the relative constancy--in BFV in the basilar artery. Estimated by the resistivity index RI circulatory resistance in the younger and intermediate school students groups decreased in the carotid arteries in the spring and summer, and in the posterior cerebral artery territory--in the winter. BFV rate variability identifies groups of children with varying degrees of "sensitivity" to the influence of seasonal factors.
PubMed ID
25697027 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of the effectiveness of emergency treatment of cerebral ischemic stroke in first aid conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227677
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1991;91(9):34-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
S L Leont'ev
O V Krokhalev
A A Belkin
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1991;91(9):34-6
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brain Ischemia - complications
Cerebral Infarction - physiopathology - therapy
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Combined Modality Therapy
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Female
First Aid
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Russia
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
The impact of the delay in therapeutic intervention at the acute stage of the disease on restitution of neurological functions is shown in 493 patients with ischemic brain stroke, admitted to an emergency neurology unit. The regress of neurological symptoms was notable in 62.9% of patients who were treated by the 6th hour since the disease onset. With the therapy instituted after 6 h, the regress was evident in 49.8% of cases. The treatment impact on the restoration of neurological functions was analyzed in 273 cases.
PubMed ID
1664611 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Assessment of arterio-venouse balance of human cerebral hemodynamics]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83268
Source
Lik Sprava. 2005 Jun;(4):30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Volians'kyi O M
Source
Lik Sprava. 2005 Jun;(4):30-4
Date
Jun-2005
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain - blood supply
Carotid Artery, Common - ultrasonography
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Humans
Jugular Veins - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Cerebral Artery - ultrasonography
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial
Abstract
22 healthy subjects aged from 25 to 45, mean age 32.7+/-5.3, have been observed. Every patient was subjected to diagnosing cerebral hemodynamics carried out every 7 days during 6 weeks. The circulation of common carotid artery, middle cerebral arteries and internal jugular arteries has been studied by means of LOGIQ-500MD (GE MS, USA) apparatus. The determination of arterio-venouse balance of cerebral hemodynamics was shown to be worthwhile for common carotid artery and its homolateral internal jugular artery. Arterio-venouse balance is presented as a ratio of circulation blood velocity in common carotid and internal jugular arteries.
PubMed ID
16158710 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of brain amyloid-ß with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104733
Source
Brain. 2014 May;137(Pt 5):1550-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Niklas Mattsson
Duygu Tosun
Philip S Insel
Alix Simonson
Clifford R Jack
Laurel A Beckett
Michael Donohue
William Jagust
Norbert Schuff
Michael W Weiner
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centre, Centre for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases, San Francisco, CA, USA.
Source
Brain. 2014 May;137(Pt 5):1550-61
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Amyloid beta-Peptides - metabolism
Aniline Compounds - diagnostic use
Brain - metabolism - radionuclide imaging
Canada
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Ethylene Glycols - diagnostic use
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Middle Aged
Mild Cognitive Impairment - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Positron-Emission Tomography
Regional Blood Flow
Spin Labels
United States
Abstract
Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-ß pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-ß with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-ß accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-ß-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-ß had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-ß load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-ß load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-ß-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-ß with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-ß being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-ß pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to dementia patients. Amyloid-ß pathology has different associations with cerebral blood flow and volume, and may cause more loss of blood flow in early stages, whereas volume loss dominates in late disease stages.
PubMed ID
24625697 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cerebral diffusion and perfusion deficits in North Sea divers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140721
Source
Acta Radiol. 2010 Nov;51(9):1050-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Gunnar Moen
Karsten Specht
Torfinn Taxt
Endre Sundal
Marit Grøning
Einar Thorsen
Kari Troland
Agot Irgens
Renate Grüner
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. gunnar.moen@helse-bergen.no
Source
Acta Radiol. 2010 Nov;51(9):1050-8
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Blood Volume - physiology
Case-Control Studies
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Contrast Media - administration & dosage
Decompression Sickness - physiopathology
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Diving - injuries
Humans
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Male
Microcirculation - physiology
Middle Aged
North Sea
Norway
Occupational Diseases - physiopathology
Organometallic Compounds - administration & dosage
Abstract
Diving is associated with a risk of cerebral decompression illness, and the prevalence of neurological symptoms is higher in divers compared with control groups. Microvascular dysfunction due to gas microembolism and exposure to hyperoxia are possible mechanisms, which may result in cerebral diffusion and perfusion deficits.
To investigate if possible functional derangements of the microvasculature and microstructure would be more prevalent among symptomatic divers.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 91 former divers and 45 controls. Individual parametric images of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) were generated on the basis of diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging. To identify regions with statistically significant differences between groups (P
PubMed ID
20849321 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cerebral perfusion in patients with chronic neck and upper back pain: preliminary observations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127853
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 Feb;35(2):76-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Maxim A Bakhtadze
Howard Vernon
Anatoliy V Karalkin
Sergey P Pasha
Igor O Tomashevskiy
David Soave
Author Affiliation
Center for Manual Therapy, Moscow, Russia.
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2012 Feb;35(2):76-85
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Back Pain - diagnosis - radionuclide imaging - therapy
Brain - blood supply - radionuclide imaging
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Manipulation, Chiropractic - methods
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - diagnosis - radionuclide imaging - therapy
Pain Measurement
Physical Examination - methods
Risk assessment
Russia
Severity of Illness Index
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between cerebral perfusion levels, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, and spinal joint fixations in patients with neck pain.
Forty-five adult patients (29 were female) with chronic neck/upper thoracic pain during exacerbation were studied. The subjects were grouped according to NDI scores: mild, moderate, and severe. The number of painful/blocked segments in the cervical and upper thoracic spine and costovertebral joints, pain intensity using the visual analog scale, and regional cerebral blood flow of the brain using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were obtained. The SPECT was analyzed semiquantitatively. Analysis of variance tests were conducted on total SPECT scores in each of the NDI groups (P
PubMed ID
22257946 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cerebrovascular disease in women with systemic lupus erythematosus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114510
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(3):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
D L Faizulina
V V Shprakh
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(3):4-8
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
An analysis of frequency, structure and risk factors of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is presented. A study included 143 women (mean age 36.7±12.7 years) with confirmed systemic lupus erythematosus. Acute or chronic CVD was found almost in a half of cases. Among acute blood circulation disorders, there was a high frequency of brain ischemia with equal number of cases with transitory ischemic attacks and ischemic strokes. Chronic cerebrovascular disease was mostly represented by chronic brain ischemia. The basic (standard) and some specific (non-standard) risk factors of the development of cerebrovascular disease in women with SLE are revealed. Based on the features of a clinical course of SLE, we identified the correlations of acute blood circulation disorders with duration, course and activity of disease. The paper presents original methods of the mathematical prediction of the development of chronic brain ischemia in women with SLE without clinical manifestations of cerebrovascular pathology. The tactics of prophylactic medical examinations depending on the results of the prediction model was proposed. The authors present an approximate list of preventive measures based on the use of systems of individual prediction.
PubMed ID
23612403 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Characteristics of cerebral hemodynamics in children with chronic diseases of digestive tract organs]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29701
Source
Lik Sprava. 2005 Jan-Feb;(1-2):55-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V D Shkurenko
Source
Lik Sprava. 2005 Jan-Feb;(1-2):55-7
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Cerebral Cortex - blood supply - physiopathology
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Child
Digestive System Diseases - physiopathology
English Abstract
Humans
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial
Abstract
The article presents the results of Doppler examination of 44 healthy children and 180 children with chronic pathology of alimentary tract. All the patients underwent the reactivity test of the middle cerebral artery after graduated cool-water bearing. Dynamics of the studied data are presented in the article. The obtained results indicate more distinct changes of function of the vegetative nervous system in children with organic pathology of the alimentary canal.
PubMed ID
15915993 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cold retrograde cerebral perfusion improves cerebral protection during moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest: A long-term study in a porcine model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57276
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1999 Nov;118(5):938-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
V. Anttila
K. Kiviluoma
M. Pokela
J. Rimpiläinen
M. Mäkiranta
V. Jäntti
J. Hirvonen
T. Juvonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1999 Nov;118(5):938-45
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Brain - blood supply
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Cold
Electroencephalography
Female
Heart Arrest, Induced
Hypothermia, Induced
Monitoring, Intraoperative
Perfusion - methods
Random Allocation
Reperfusion Injury - prevention & control
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rewarming
Swine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is an effective method of cerebral protection, but it is associated with long cardiopulmonary bypass times and coagulation disturbances. Previous studies have shown that retrograde cerebral perfusion can improve neurologic outcomes after prolonged hypothermic circulatory arrest. We tested the hypothesis that deep hypothermic retrograde cerebral perfusion could improve cerebral outcome during moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest. METHODS: Twelve pigs (23-29 kg) were randomly assigned to undergo either retrograde cerebral perfusion (15 degrees C) at 25 degrees C or hypothermic circulatory arrest with the head packed in ice at 25 degrees C for 45 minutes. Flow was adjusted to maintain superior vena cava pressure at 20 mm Hg throughout retrograde cerebral perfusion. Hemodynamic, electrophysiologic, metabolic, and temperature monitoring were carried out until 4 hours after the start of rewarming. Daily behavioral assessment was performed until elective death on day 7. A postmortem histologic analysis of the brain was carried out on all animals. RESULTS: In the retrograde cerebral perfusion group, 5 (83%) of 6 animals survived 7 days compared with 2 (33%) of 6 in the hypothermic circulatory arrest group. Complete behavioral recovery was seen in 4 (67%) animals after retrograde cerebral perfusion but only in 1 (17%) animal after hypothermic circulatory arrest. Postoperative levels of serum lactate were higher, and blood pH was lower in the hypothermic circulatory arrest group. There were no significant hemodynamic differences between the study groups. CONCLUSIONS: Cold hypothermic retrograde cerebral perfusion during moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest seems to improve neurologic outcome compared with moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest with the head packed in ice.
PubMed ID
10534701 View in PubMed
Less detail

45 records – page 1 of 5.