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50 records – page 1 of 5.

[A case of neuroborreliosis in Västerbotten]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37998
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Oct 25;86(43):3652
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-25-1989

[Analysis of the Moscow population of Neisseria meningitidis strains by the method of multilocus sequencing-typing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168921
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
K O Mironov
A E Platonov
I S Koroleva
G A Shipulin
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):31-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebrospinal Fluid - microbiology
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Humans
Meningococcal Infections - microbiology - prevention & control
Molecular Epidemiology
Moscow - epidemiology
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Serotyping
Species Specificity
Abstract
The analysis of meningococcal strains of different serogroups, isolated from the liquor of patients in Moscow, which was carried out with the method of multilocus sequencing-typing (MLST), was presented. At the periods of epidemic morbidity rises in Moscow the prevalence of group A meningococcal strains, belonging to subgroups III with sequence-types 5 (in the 1970s) and 7 (in 1996), was noted, and at a period between epidemics strains of genetic subgroups VI and X were isolated. Meningococcal strains, groups B and C, isolated in 1995 - 2002, had, as a rule, unique sequence-types, differing both one from another and from N. meningitidis sequence-types detected in other countries. Among group B meningococci the prevalence of strains belonging to clonal complex ST-18 was noted, while for group C meningococcci strains belonging to clonal complex ST-41/44 were most typical. Such genetic variability of circulating meningococci was regarded as characteristic of the period between epidemics, observed in Moscow since the end of the 1980s.
PubMed ID
16758895 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic susceptibility of 629 bacterial blood and CSF isolates from Swedish infants and the therapeutic implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59764
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Feb;80(2):205-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1991
Author
K. Tullus
B. Olsson-Liljequist
G. Lundström
L G Burman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, St. Göran's Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Feb;80(2):205-12
Date
Feb-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aminoglycosides
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Blood - microbiology
Cephalosporins - therapeutic use
Cerebrospinal Fluid - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Meningitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Septicemia - drug therapy - microbiology
Sweden
Abstract
Blood and CSF isolates (n = 629) from Swedish infants up to one year of age were tested in vitro against 13 antimicrobial agents in order to update the guidelines for empiric therapy of septicaemia and meningitis. Ampicillin plus gentamicin provided inadequate empiric therapy for meningitis, due to the poor CSF penetration of the aminoglycoside and the frequent occurrence of bacterial resistance to ampicillin. Ceftazidime and cefuroxime were moderately active, particularly against isolates from small infants. Cefotaxime today seemed to provide the best empiric therapy of septicaemia and meningitis in infants. Because of the occurrence of Listeria and enterococcal infections, ampicillin should initially be added and other combinations are also advisable for the occasional cases of Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Serratia, and Pseudomonas infections. For coagulase-negative staphylococci only vancomycin offered a broad activity (100% at achievable serum levels).
PubMed ID
2035312 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic susceptibility of blood and cerebrospinal fluid isolates of Haemophilus influenzae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239228
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 1985 Feb;15(2):187-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
R M Bannatyne
S. Toma
R. Cheung
D. Hodge
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 1985 Feb;15(2):187-91
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Child
Culture Media
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Haemophilus Infections - blood - cerebrospinal fluid - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - drug effects
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Ontario
Abstract
One hundred and sixty-nine blood and cerebrospinal fluid isolates of Haemophilus influenzae, collected in the Province of Ontario from children and adults from 1976 to 1983, were tested for susceptibility to six conventional and eight newer antibacterial drugs. Most active were ceftriaxone, ceftizoxime and cefotaxime (MIC90 less than or equal to 0.02 mg/l); latamoxef (moxalactam), acrosoxacin and ceftazidime were close behind with MIC90s in the 0.05-0.09 mg/l range. Twenty-five strains (14.8%) were beta-lactamase-producing and thus resistant to ampicillin. There were no chloramphenicol-resistant strains. The isolates showed intermediate but still clinically useful susceptibility to trimethoprim, rifampicin, cefuroxime, piperacillin and chloramphenicol and were least susceptible to gentamicin and sulphamethoxazole.
PubMed ID
3872296 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic susceptibility of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from cerebrospinal fluid and blood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12666
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [B]. 1986 Jun;94(3):167-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986
Author
M. Arpi
P Z Hønberg
N. Frimodt-Møller
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [B]. 1986 Jun;94(3):167-71
Date
Jun-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Cefotaxime - pharmacology
Ceftriaxone - pharmacology
Cephalosporins - pharmacology
Cerebrospinal Fluid - microbiology
Chloramphenicol - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Haemophilus Infections - cerebrospinal fluid - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - drug effects - enzymology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Netilmicin - pharmacology
Rifampin - pharmacology
Septicemia - microbiology
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
Abstract
The emergence of ampicillin and chloramphenicol resistant Haemophilus influenzae type b in Denmark has created demands for alternative treatments of serious infections with H. influenzae. In this study 102 strains of H. influenzae recovered from cerebrospinal fluid (85) and blood (17) were tested for susceptibility to ampicillin, piperacillin, erythromycin, rifampicin, chloramphenicol, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, moxalactam, aztreonam, and netilmicin by means of the agar dilution method. The majority (97%) was H. influenzae type b and of these strains 94% belonged to biotype I. Nine of the investigated strains were beta-lactamase producers. Ceftriaxone and cefotaxime were the most active agents (MIC90 less than or equal to 0.025 microliter/ml) followed by moxalactam and aztreonam (MIC90 = 0.1 microgram/ml). Except for ampicillin and piperacillin, the MIC was similar for beta-lactamase producers and non-producers. Several of the investigated antibiotics, especially some of the third generation cephalosporins, might constitute valid therapeutical alternatives to conventional drugs in the treatment of severe H. influenzae infections.
PubMed ID
3488639 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic treatment delay and outcome in acute bacterial meningitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91315
Source
J Infect. 2008 Dec;57(6):449-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Køster-Rasmussen Rasmus
Korshin André
Meyer Christian N
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Hvidovre Hospital, Kettegård Allé 30, 2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. rasmuskoster@hotmail.com
Source
J Infect. 2008 Dec;57(6):449-54
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cerebrospinal Fluid - microbiology
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections - drug therapy - mortality
Denmark
Humans
Infant
Meningitis, Bacterial - drug therapy - mortality
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To identify to what degree in-hospital delay of antibiotic therapy correlated to outcome in community acquired bacterial meningitis. METHODS: All cases of culture-positive cerebrospinal fluids in east Denmark from 2002 to 2004 were included. Medical records were collected retrospectively with 98.4% case completeness. Glasgow Outcome Scale was used. Multiple regression outcome analyses included the hypothesised factors: delay of therapy, age, bacterial aetiology, adjuvant steroid therapy, coma at admission and the presence of risk factors. RESULTS: One hundred and eighty seven cases were included. Adult mortality was 33% and the proportion of unfavourable outcome in adults was 52%, which differed significantly from that of children (
PubMed ID
19000639 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial resistance in Haemophilus influenzae isolated from blood, cerebrospinal fluid, middle ear fluid and throat samples of children. A nationwide study in Finland in 1988-1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216391
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1995;27(1):57-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
A. Nissinen
E. Herva
M L Katila
S. Kontiainen
O. Liimatainen
S. Oinonen
A K Takala
P. Huovinen
Author Affiliation
Antimicrobial Research Laboratory, National Public Health Institute, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1995;27(1):57-61
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Ampicillin Resistance - physiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Capsules - analysis
Blood - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Cerebrospinal Fluid - microbiology
Child, Preschool
Ear, Middle - microbiology
Finland - epidemiology
Haemophilus Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Pharynx - microbiology
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
Abstract
A nation-wide survey of the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Haemophilus influenzae was conducted on isolates collected in 1988-90 from middle ear fluid (MEF), blood, or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in infected children or throat samples of healthy children. Altogether 885 strains were examined regarding capsular type b, beta-lactamase production and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ampicillin, cefaclor, erythromycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for these strains was determined by the agar dilution method. 99% (578/585) of MEF isolates, 93% (112/121) of throat isolates, but only 6% (10/179) of blood/CSF isolates were not of type b (Hib). The rate of beta-lactamase production was 11.4% among Hib strains, 8.0% among non-type b MEF isolates, and 4.5% among non-type b throat isolates. No increase in the prevalence of beta-lactamase production in H. influenzae has taken place in Finland since the early 1980s. Resistance to ampicillin among strains that lacked beta-lactamase activity was rare (0.2%). Of the non-type b MEF and throat isolates, 5.9% and 2.7%, respectively, were resistant to trimethoprim and 3.6% and 2.7%, respectively, to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Resistance to other drugs was rare (
PubMed ID
7784815 View in PubMed
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50 records – page 1 of 5.