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[A pathogenetic model of cerebral palsy in children born to mothers with antiphospholipid syndrome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81023
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2006;106(7):46-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Evtushenko S K
Moskalenko M A
Evtushenko O S
Evtushenko I S
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2006;106(7):46-51
Date
2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Antiphospholipid - blood
Antiphospholipid Syndrome - complications - immunology
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
A pathogenetic model of infantile cerebral palsy caused by maternal antiphospholipid (APS) syndrome has been elaborated. Thirty-two children with cerebral palsy born to mothers with clinical signs of APS have been studied. The basic clinical feature of cerebral palsy in children was the prevalence of the double hemiplegic form, the absence of severe cognitive disorders, global muscular hypotrophy, rapid contracture formation and a tendency to frequent respiratory diseases. A seropositive APS variant was found in 42% of mothers examined, the seronegative one--in 58%. Such factors as (1) fetoplacental insufficiency and hypoxia caused by vascular infarctions of the placenta; (2) transplacental passage of antiphospholipid antibodies from a mother to a child; (3) intracerebral hemorrhages and periventricular leucomalacia in infants play the key role in the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy in children born to mothers with APS.
PubMed ID
16921719 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of cerebral palsy with Apgar score in low and normal birthweight infants: population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140216
Source
BMJ. 2010;341:c4990
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kari Kveim Lie
Else-Karin Grøholt
Anne Eskild
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. kari.kveim.lie@fhi.no
Source
BMJ. 2010;341:c4990
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Hemiplegia - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quadriplegia - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To assess the association of Apgar score 5 minutes after birth with cerebral palsy in both normal weight and low birthweight children, and also the association with the cerebral palsy subdiagnoses of quadriplegia, diplegia, and hemiplegia.
Population based cohort study.
The Medical Birth Registry of Norway was used to identify all babies born between 1986 and 1995. These data were linked to the Norwegian Registry of Cerebral Palsy in Children born 1986-95, which was established on the basis of discharge diagnoses at all paediatric departments in Norway.
All singletons without malformations born in Norway during 1986-95 and who survived the first year of life (n=543?064).
Cerebral palsy diagnosed before the age of 5 years.
988 children (1.8 in 1000) were diagnosed with cerebral palsy before the age of 5 years. In total, 11% (39/369) of the children with Apgar score of less than 3 at birth were diagnosed with cerebral palsy, compared with only 0.1% (162/179?515) of the children with Apgar score of 10 (odds ratio (OR) 53, 95% CI 35 to 80 after adjustment for birth weight). In children with a birth weight of 2500 g or more, those with an Apgar score of less than 4 were much more likely to have cerebral palsy than those who had an Apgar score of more than 8 (OR 125, 95% confidence interval 91 to 170). The corresponding OR in children weighing less than 1500 g was 5 (95% CI 2 to 9). Among children with Apgar score of less than 4, 10-17% in all birthweight groups developed cerebral palsy. Low Apgar score was strongly associated with each of the three subgroups of spastic cerebral palsy, although the association was strongest for quadriplegia (adjusted OR 137 for Apgar score 8, 95% CI 77 to 244).
Low Apgar score was strongly associated with cerebral palsy. This association was high in children with normal birth weight and modest in children with low birth weight. The strength of the association differed between subgroups of spastic cerebral palsy. Given that Apgar score is a measure of vitality shortly after birth, our findings suggest that the causes of cerebral palsy are closely linked to factors that reduce infant vitality.
Notes
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Comment In: J Pediatr. 2011 May;158(5):860-121482248
Comment In: BMJ. 2010;341:c517520929921
PubMed ID
20929920 View in PubMed
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Association of Preeclampsia in Term Births With Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306377
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2020 08 01; 77(8):823-829
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2020
Author
Bob Z Sun
Dag Moster
Quaker E Harmon
Allen J Wilcox
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle.
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2020 08 01; 77(8):823-829
Date
08-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Autism Spectrum Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neurodevelopmental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Preeclampsia during pregnancy has been linked to an increased risk of cerebral palsy in offspring. Less is known about the role of preeclampsia in other neurodevelopmental disorders.
To determine the association between preeclampsia and a range of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in offspring after excluding preterm births.
This prospective, population-based cohort study included singleton children born at term from January 1, 1991, through December 31, 2009, and followed up through December 31, 2014 (to 5 years of age), using Norway's Medical Birth Registry and linked to other demographic, social, and health information by Statistics Norway. Data were analyzed from May 30, 2018, to November 17, 2019.
Maternal preeclampsia.
Associations between preeclampsia in term pregnancies and cerebral palsy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), epilepsy, intellectual disability, and vision or hearing loss using multivariable logistic regression.
The cohort consisted of 980?560 children born at term (48.8% female and 51.2% male; mean [SD] gestational age, 39.8 [1.4] weeks) with a mean (SD) follow-up of 14.0 (5.6) years. Among these children, 28?068 (2.9%) were exposed to preeclampsia. Exposed children were at increased risk of ADHD (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% CI, 1.05-1.33), ASD (adjusted OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.08-1.54), epilepsy (adjusted OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.16-1.93), and intellectual disability (adjusted OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.13-1.97); there was also an apparent association between preeclampsia exposure and cerebral palsy (adjusted OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.94-1.80).
Preeclampsia is a well-established threat to the mother. Other than the hazards associated with preterm delivery, the risks to offspring from preeclampsia are usually regarded as less important. This study's findings suggest that preeclampsia at term may have lasting effects on neurodevelopment of the child.
PubMed ID
32236510 View in PubMed
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Bilateral spastic cerebral palsy--a collaborative study between southwest Germany and western Sweden. III: Aetiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35372
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1995 Mar;37(3):191-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
I. Krägeloh-Mann
G. Hagberg
C. Meisner
G. Haas
K E Eeg-Olofsson
H K Selbmann
B. Hagberg
R. Michaelis
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Neurology, University of Tübingen, Germany.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1995 Mar;37(3):191-203
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Germany - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Laterality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In this third report from the collaborative study of children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy born between 1975 and 1986, aetiology was analysed. Evidence for a prenatal aetiology increased with gestational age, whereas evidence for a peri-/neonatal aetiology decreased. The largest subgroup, the leg-dominated subtype, showed the same distribution of aetiology as the total group. A prenatal aetiology was found mainly among term and moderately preterm children with a four-limb-dominated subtype; a peri-/neonatal aetiology among very preterm children with a three- or four-limb-dominated subtype or among term children with a dyskinetic-spastic subtype. The findings support the hypothesis generated from the authors' epidemiological results of a peri-/neonatal aetiology being predominant among preterm, and a prenatal aetiology among term, children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy.
Notes
Comment In: Dev Med Child Neurol. 1995 Sep;37(9):841-37589868
PubMed ID
7890124 View in PubMed
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Cerebral palsy among children born after in vitro fertilization: the role of preterm delivery--a population-based, cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83396
Source
Pediatrics. 2006 Aug;118(2):475-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Hvidtjørn Dorte
Grove Jakob
Schendel Diana E
Vaeth Michael
Ernst Erik
Nielsen Lene F
Thorsen Poul
Author Affiliation
North Atlantic Neuro-Epidemiology Alliances, Department of Epidemiology, University of Aarhus, Paludan-Müllers vej 17, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. dh@soci.au.dk
Source
Pediatrics. 2006 Aug;118(2):475-82
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Damage, Chronic - epidemiology - etiology
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - etiology
Educational Status
Embryo Transfer
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Male
Maternal Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess the incidence of cerebral palsy among children conceived with in vitro fertilization and children conceived without in vitro fertilization. METHODS: A population-based, cohort study, including all live-born singletons and twins born in Denmark between January 1, 1995, and December 31, 2000, was performed. Children conceived with in vitro fertilization (9255 children) were identified through the In Vitro Fertilization Register; children conceived without in vitro fertilization (394,713) were identified through the Danish Medical Birth Register. Cerebral palsy diagnoses were obtained from the National Register of Hospital Discharges. The main outcome measure was the incidence of cerebral palsy in the in vitro fertilization and non-in vitro fertilization groups. RESULTS: Children born after in vitro fertilization had an increased risk of cerebral palsy; these results were largely unchanged after adjustment for maternal age, gender, parity, small-for-gestational age status, and educational level. The independent effect of in vitro fertilization vanished after additional adjustment for multiplicity or preterm delivery. When both multiplicity and preterm delivery were included in the multivariate models, preterm delivery remained associated strongly with the risk of cerebral palsy. CONCLUSIONS: The large proportions of preterm deliveries with in vitro fertilization, primarily for twins but also for singletons, pose an increased risk of cerebral palsy.
PubMed ID
16882798 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cerebral palsy among children in Nordland 1977-91. Occurrence, etiology, disability]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33968
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Feb 20;118(5):706-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1998
Author
G A Herder
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen Nordland Sentralsykehus, Bodø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Feb 20;118(5):706-9
Date
Feb-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disabled Children
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications
Perinatal Care - standards
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
An increasing prevalence of cerebral palsy has been reported in Sweden and other countries. One Norwegian study shows decreasing incidence, another shows increasing incidence among preterm children. The aim of this study is to describe prevalence of cerebral palsy and its etiology and disability among children in Nordland county who were born between 1977 and 1991. Perinatal mortality in the county declined from 11 per 1,000 in 1973-83 to 7.9 per 1,000 in 1987-91. 62 boys and 31 girls were diagnosed with cerebral palsy. The prevalence was 1.91 in 1977-81, 1.98 in 1982-86 and 2.05 per 1,000 i 1987-91. Among children with a birthweight
PubMed ID
9528366 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cerebral palsy and additional handicaps in a 1-year birth cohort from northern Finland--a prospective follow-up study to the age of 14 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39634
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1985;17(4):156-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
L. von Wendt
P. Rantakallio
A L Saukkonen
M. Tuisku
H. Mäkinen
Source
Ann Clin Res. 1985;17(4):156-61
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Mental Retardation - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vision Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
In a 1-year birth cohort from the two northernmost provinces in Finland, Oulu and Lapland which comprised of 12 058 liveborn infants, the total number of children affected with cerebral palsy (CP) was 69. The cumulative incidence up to the age of 14 years was 5.7 per thousand. A prenatal aetiology was present in 32%, a perinatal aetiology in 36% and a postnatal aetiology in 19% whereas in 13.0% of the cases the cause remained untraceable. A total of 50 children (73%), had 1 or more additional handicaps. Mental retardation (IQ less than 85) was present in 70%, epilepsy in 48%, a visual defect in 19% and impaired hearing in 7%. The impact of the total handicaps is also illustrated by the fact that only 33% of the children were able to attend a normal school. The incidence of 5.7 per thousand recorded here is clearly higher than in studies from several other countries, as the cumulative incidence is usually reported to vary between 2 and 3 per thousand.
PubMed ID
4073804 View in PubMed
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Cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorders, and developmental delay in children born after assisted conception: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153331
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Jan;163(1):72-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Dorte Hvidtjørn
Laura Schieve
Diana Schendel
Bo Jacobsson
Claus Svaerke
Poul Thorsen
Author Affiliation
NANEA, Institute of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, University of Aarhus, Paludan-Müllers vej 17, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. dh@soci.au.dk
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Jan;163(1):72-83
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autistic Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - adverse effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic - adverse effects
Abstract
To assess the existing evidence of associations between assisted conception and cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and developmental delay.
Forty-one studies identified in a systematical PubMed and Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE) search for articles published from January 1, 1996, to April 1, 2008.
Studies written in English comparing children born after assisted conception with children born after natural conception assessing CP, ASD, and developmental delay, based on original data with a follow-up of 1 year or more. Main Exposures In vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection or ovulation induction with or without subsequent intrauterine insemination.
Cerebral palsy, ASD, and developmental delay.
Nine CP studies showed that children born after IVF had an increased risk of CP associated with preterm delivery. In our meta-analysis including 19 462 children exposed to IVF, we estimated a crude odds ratio of 2.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.71-2.77). Eight ASD studies and 30 studies on developmental delay showed inconsistent results. No studies assessed the risk of CP, ASD, or developmental delay in children born after ovulation induction exclusively.
Methodological problems were revealed in the identified studies, and the gaps in our knowledge about the long-term outcomes of children born after assisted conception are considerable, including a lack of information on the long-term consequences of ovulation induction. Possible associations with ASD and developmental delay need assessment in larger studies. Studies on assisted conception and CP from countries outside of Scandinavia are needed, including detailed information on time to pregnancy, underlying cause of infertility, and type of IVF treatment.
PubMed ID
19124707 View in PubMed
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[Cerebral palsy in Eastern Denmark 1965-1974. II Significance of perinatal factors--birth place and birth weight. Cerebral Palsy Registry no VIII]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60441
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Sep 20;144(38):2805-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1982

48 records – page 1 of 5.