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Active epilepsy in mentally retarded children. I. Prevalence and additional neuro-impairments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35144
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1995 Oct;84(10):1147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
U. Steffenburg
G. Hagberg
G. Viggedal
M. Kyllerman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Göteborg, Ostra Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1995 Oct;84(10):1147-52
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Retardation - complications - epidemiology
Movement Disorders - classification - complications
Nervous System Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
A population-based study of active epilepsy was conducted in 6-13-year-old mentally retarded children born between 1975 and 1986. The population at risk comprised 48,873 children. Ninety-eight children were identified, 35 mildly and 63 severely retarded. The prevalence was 2.0 per 1000; 0.7 per 1000 for mildly and 1.3 per 1000 for severely retarded children. Sixty-nine children had at least one additional neuroimpairment. Cerebral palsy was found in 42 children with a majority of spastic/dystonic tetraplegias; visual impairment was present in 24 and autism in 24. Thirty-three children had only a mild or no gross motor disability and mild mental retardation, while 23 had IQs
PubMed ID
8563227 View in PubMed
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Bilateral spastic cerebral palsy--a comparative study between south-west Germany and western Sweden. I: Clinical patterns and disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36045
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1993 Dec;35(12):1037-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
I. Krägeloh-Mann
G. Hagberg
C. Meisner
B. Schelp
G. Haas
K E Eeg-Olofsson
H K Selbmann
B. Hagberg
R. Michaelis
Author Affiliation
Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Abteilung Entwicklungsnerologie, Germany.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1993 Dec;35(12):1037-47
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology
Germany - epidemiology
Hearing Loss - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Mental Competency
Motor Skills - physiology
Muscle Spasticity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The results of a collaborative study of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (BSCP) between south-west Germany and western Sweden are reported, comprising 249 children in south-west Germany and 264 children in western Sweden. A severe gross motor disability was present in 65 per cent of the German and 62 per cent of the Swedish children; learning difficulties or mental retardation in 73 and 76 per cent; active epilepsy in 28 and 26 per cent; and severe visual disability in 20 and 19 per cent, respectively. Severe disabilities were especially pronounced in children with normal birthweights, in whom the most severe subtypes of BSCP were also found. Leg-dominated BSCP was the predominant subtype among low-birthweight children, but also occurred in more than half of the normal-birthweight children. The authors conclude that the two series were comparable, and that reliable results between countries can be obtained if clear-cut classifications and definitions are used.
PubMed ID
8253285 View in PubMed
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Bilateral spastic cerebral palsy--a comparative study between southwest Germany and western Sweden. II: Epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35777
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1994 Jun;36(6):473-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
I. Krägeloh-Mann
G. Hagberg
C. Meisner
B. Schelp
G. Haas
K E Eeg-Olofsson
H K Selbmann
B. Hagberg
R. Michaelis
Author Affiliation
Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Abteilung Entwicklungsneurologie, Germany.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1994 Jun;36(6):473-83
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Muscle Spasticity - complications - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Epidemiological data of a collaborative study on children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (BSCP) between south-west Germany and western Sweden are reported. The study period covered the birth years 1975 to 1986. Overall, the rate of BSCP increased during the birth year periods 1975-77 and 1978-80, but decreased thereafter. The rise was due to an increase of BSCP in low-birthweight (LBW) children, especially very LBW (VLBW) children. Mortality rates in LBW, and particularly VLBW, children decreased significantly during the whole study period in both countries. The BSCP rate, after the initial increase, showed a decrease during the second half of the study period in LBW children. Results are interpreted in favour of a predominantly prenatal aetiology in normal-birthweight and of a predominantly peri- and neonatal aetiology in LBW children.
PubMed ID
8005358 View in PubMed
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Cerebral palsy--an increasing contributor to severe mental retardation?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36629
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1992 Aug;67(8):1050-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
A. Nicholson
E. Alberman
Author Affiliation
Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Medical College of St Bartholomew's Hospital.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1992 Aug;67(8):1050-5
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mental Retardation - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Western Australia - epidemiology
Abstract
It is estimated that the prevalence of nongenetic SMR associated with cerebral palsy has risen from 0.7 to about 0.9 per 1000 live births in the last decade. This is due to the predicted rise in total cerebral palsy prevalence to 2.5/1000 live births. This predicted prevalence of cerebral palsy is similar to that given for Western Australia in 1979-82, allowing for postnatal causes, but is higher than prevalence data from England and Sweden for that period. The estimated rise is due largely to improved survival and increased proportion of low birthweight babies since 1983 and also reflects the use of prevalence rates based on Mersey data. Improvements in prenatal diagnosis, and a parental choice of selective termination may lead to reductions in other causes of SMR, such as Down's syndrome and neural tube defects, so it seems that children both physically and mentally handicapped due to brain damage will contribute a greater proportion of the SMR population. The careload of these children is greater than that associated with many other causes of SMR and most survive into adult life. The implications for planning future services will need to be recognised.
PubMed ID
1520012 View in PubMed
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The changing panorama of cerebral palsy in Sweden. VII. Prevalence and origin in the birth year period 1987-90.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34698
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1996 Aug;85(8):954-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
B. Hagberg
G. Hagberg
I. Olow
L. van Wendt
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1996 Aug;85(8):954-60
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Epilepsy - complications
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Male
Mental Retardation - complications
Paralysis - complications
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - complications
Abstract
This seventh Swedish population-based cerebral palsy (CP) report comprises 216 children born between 1987 and 1990. The crude live birth prevalence was 2.36 per 1000, indicating a break in the continuous increase since 1970. Excluding 10 postnatally-derived cases, gestational-age specific prevalences were 80 for extremely, 54 for very and 8 for moderately preterms and 1.4 for term children per 1000. Birth weight-specific prevalences were 57 for birth weights or = 2500 g per 1000. The aetiology was considered prenatal in 8%, peri/neonatal in 54% and unclassifiable in 38% of preterms and 33, 28 and 39% of term children. Hemiplegic, diplegic and tetraplegic syndromes accounted for 22, 66 and 7% of preterms and 44, 29 and 10% of term children. Non-walking, mental retardation, epilepsy, severe visual impairment and infantile hydrocephalus were present in 39, 39, 26, 18 and 23% of preterms; and 38, 44, 36, 14 and 5% of term children, respectively. The entire series of 1408 cases born in 1954-90 revealed three distinct trend eras for preterms, clearly related to changes in perinatal care and shifts in type of CP manifestations.
PubMed ID
8863878 View in PubMed
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Clinical and aetiological aspects of epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30915
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2003 Jun;45(6):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Malin Carlsson
Gudrun Hagberg
Ingrid Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2003 Jun;45(6):371-6
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Paralysis - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aims of this retrospective and population-based study were to describe the frequency and characteristics of epilepsy in 146 children (82 males and 64 females) with cerebral palsy (CP) born from 1987 to 1994 in the Göteborg area of Sweden. The frequency of epilepsy was found to be 38% (55 children). All children with tetraplegic CP and about one-third of the children with other CP types developed epilepsy. Age at onset of epilepsy varied with type of CP: children with tetraplegic CP tended to have an earlier onset of epilepsy than children with other CP types. Partial seizures were the most common seizure type; all children with hemiplegic CP had partial seizures. Children with cognitive impairment had a higher frequency of epilepsy than those without cognitive impairment. CP aetiology may predict the development and outcome of epilepsy, as children with CP caused by CNS malformation, CNS infection, and grey matter damage all showed a higher frequency of epilepsy than children with CP of other aetiology, and also had less chance of becoming seizure-free.
PubMed ID
12785437 View in PubMed
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Comorbidities in cerebral palsy: a patient registry study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309392
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2020 01; 62(1):97-103
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2020
Author
Sandra J Hollung
Inger J Bakken
Torstein Vik
Stian Lydersen
Robert Wiik
Kari M Aaberg
Guro L Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cerebral Palsy Registry of Norway, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2020 01; 62(1):97-103
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe the total burden of disease in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) in Norway.
A comprehensive set of disorder categories were extracted from the Norwegian Patient Registry using International Statistical Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnosis codes for individuals born between 1996 and 2010 who received specialist healthcare between 2008 and 2017 (0-21y). Individuals with CP were identified through a validation study in cooperation with the Cerebral Palsy Registry of Norway. Risk differences (proportions of individuals recorded with each disorder) were used to compare individuals with CP with the general population without CP.
The study included 966 760 individuals. Among these, 2302 (0.24%) had CP (1330 males, 972 females). Of the individuals with CP, 95.0% were recorded with one or more comorbidity, and the risks of medical, neurological, and mental/behavioural disorders were higher compared with the risks in the general population. The most common neurological and mental/behavioural disorders were cocausal, i.e. attributed to the same injury to the developing brain that caused CP, while medical disorders were most often complications of CP or coincidentally co-occurring with CP.
Individuals with CP have a considerably higher burden of medical, neurological, and mental/behavioural disorders compared with the general population, including disorders that are not directly caused by, or complications to, the brain injury.
Nearly all individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) had one or more comorbidity. Fifty-two per cent had at least one comorbidity attributed to the same cause as CP, complications of CP, and coincidentally co-occurring with CP. Risks of medical, neurological, and mental/behavioural disorders were considerably higher than in the general population.
PubMed ID
31273772 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the prevalence and impact of health problems of pre-school children with and without cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135835
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2012 Jan;38(1):128-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
C. Wong
D J Bartlett
L A Chiarello
H-J Chang
B. Stoskopf
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2012 Jan;38(1):128-38
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Male
Prevalence
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The range of health problems associated with children with cerebral palsy (CP) is well documented in the literature; however, the existing data are often either reported for samples of children with all types of CP, or stratified by typology of motor disorder, rather than using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), which has been shown to be the most reliable way of classifying children with CP. Furthermore, availability of research on pre-school-aged children (under 5 years) is sparse. The aim of this study is to compare the prevalence and impact of health problems in pre-school children with and without CP, stratified by the GMFCS.
Parents of 430 pre-school-aged children with CP (243 boys, 187 girls; mean age = 3 years 2 months, SD = 11 months) and 107 typically developing (TD) children (56 boys, 51 girls; mean age = 3 years 4 months, SD = 11 months) participated. Using the consensus definition of CP and the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, a parent survey was developed to assess the prevalence and impact of 16 health problems. The measure demonstrates good test-retest reliability (ICC > 0.80) and discriminant validity across GMFCS levels (P
PubMed ID
21443556 View in PubMed
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Congenital anomalies and the severity of impairments for cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286842
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2017 Nov;59(11):1174-1180
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Kjersti P Jystad
Kristin M Strand
Solveig Bjellmo
Stian Lydersen
Kari Klungsöyr
Magne Stoknes
Jon Skranes
Guro L Andersen
Torstein Vik
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2017 Nov;59(11):1174-1180
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Functional Laterality
Gestational Age
Humans
Male
Nervous System Malformations - complications - epidemiology
Norway
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
To study the prevalence of congenital anomalies among children with cerebral palsy (CP) born at term or late preterm, and if CP subtypes and clinical manifestations differ between children with and without congenital anomalies.
This was a cross-sectional study using data from the Cerebral Palsy Register of Norway and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. All children with congenital CP born at and later than 34 weeks' gestation in Norway from 1999 to 2009 were included. Anomalies were classified according to the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies classification guidelines. Groups were compared using Fisher's exact test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and the Mann-Whitney U test.
Among 685 children with CP, 169 (25%) had a congenital anomaly; 125 within the central nervous system. Spastic bilateral CP was more prevalent in children with anomalies (42%) than in children without (34%; p=0.011). Children with anomalies less frequently had low Apgar scores (p
PubMed ID
28967231 View in PubMed
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Development of a risk score for scoliosis in children with cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307330
Source
Acta Orthop. 2020 04; 91(2):203-208
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
04-2020
Author
Katina Pettersson
Philippe Wagner
Elisabet Rodby-Bousquet
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Orthopedics, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop. 2020 04; 91(2):203-208
Date
04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - complications - epidemiology
Female
Hip Joint - physiopathology
Humans
Knee Joint - physiopathology
Male
Range of Motion, Articular
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Scoliosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Background and purpose - Children and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP) have an increased risk of developing scoliosis, with a prevalence ranging from 11% to 29%. Information on risk factors for the emergence and progression of scoliosis is inconclusive. This study aimed to develop a risk score based on 5-year-old children with CP to predict the risk of scoliosis before the age of 16.Patients and methods - This prospective registry study included 654 children with CP in Sweden born in 2000 to 2003 and registered with the Swedish CP follow-up program (CPUP) at the age of 5 years, including all Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels. 92 children developed a scoliosis before the age of 16 years. Univariable and multivariable logistic regressions were used to analyze 8 potential predictors for scoliosis: GMFCS, sex, spastic subtype, epilepsy, hip surgery, migration percentage, and limited hip or knee extension.Results - 4 predictors for scoliosis remained significant after analyses: female sex, GMFCS levels IV and V, epilepsy, and limited knee extension, and a risk score was constructed based on these factors. The predictive ability of the risk score was high, with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.87 (95% CI 0.84-0.91).Interpretation - The risk score shows high discriminatory ability for differentiating between individuals at high and low risk for development of scoliosis before the age of 16. It may be useful when considering interventions to prevent or predict severe scoliosis in young children with CP.
PubMed ID
31928285 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.