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Source
J Environ Radioact. 2011 May;102(5):438-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Tuukka Turtiainen
Eila Kostiainen
Anja Hallikainen
Author Affiliation
STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, 00881 Helsinki, Finland. tuukka.turtiainen@stuk.fi
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2011 May;102(5):438-42
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cereals - chemistry - classification - metabolism
Data Collection
Female
Finland
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Lead Radioisotopes - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Polonium - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Radiation monitoring
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
A survey was carried out on the activity concentrations of (210)Pb and (210)Po in cereal grains produced in Finland. The cereal species were wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oats (Avena sativa) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), which account for 90% of the Finnish consumption of cereal products. The survey consisted of 18 flour and 13 unprocessed cereal samples and one hulled grain sample from 22 flour mills. According to the results, the mean (210)Pb/(210)Po concentrations in wheat grains, wheat flour, rye flour, oat grains and barley grains were 0.29, 0.12, 0.29, 0.36 and 0.36 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Combined with the consumption rates of the products, we assess that the mean effective doses from (210)Pb and (210)Po in cereal products for the adult male and female population are 22 and 17 µSv per year, respectively.
PubMed ID
21035236 View in PubMed
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Accelerated lung function decline in swine confinement workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208355
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Senthilselvan
J A Dosman
S P Kirychuk
E M Barber
C S Rhodes
Y. Zhang
T S Hurst
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Agriculture
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cereals
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Saskatchewan
Smoking - physiopathology
Swine
Abstract
We conducted a longitudinal study to determine the annual rate decline in pulmonary function measurements in male swine confinement workers. For comparison, a grain farming group and a nonfarming rural-dwelling control group were also chosen for the longitudinal study. Two hundred seventeen swine confinement workers, 218 grain farmers, and 179 nonfarming control subjects had valid pulmonary function measurements at the baseline observation conducted in 1990 to 1991 and at the second observation conducted in 1994 to 1995. The swine confinement workers were younger (mean age=38.3+/-11.7 [SD] years) than the nonfarming control subjects (42.6+/-10.4 years) and the grain farmers (44.5+/-11.9 years). When stratified by age, nonfarming control subjects had the lowest mean annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC in all age categories. The swine confinement workers had the largest annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC, and this was most obvious in the middle age categories. After controlling for age, height, smoking, and baseline pulmonary function, swine confinement workers had excess annual decline of 26.1 mL in FEV1 (p=0.0005), 33.5 mL in FVC (p=0.0002), and 42.0 mL/s in forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC (FEF[25-75%]) (p=0.02) over nonfarming control subjects. Grain farmers had excess annual decline of 16.4 mL in FEV1 (p=0.03), 26.7 mL in FVC (p=0.002), and 11.2 mL/s in FEF(25-75%) (p=0.38) over control subjects. These findings suggest that workers engaged in the swine industry and grain farmers appear prone to accelerated yearly losses in lung function and may therefore be at risk for the future development of chronic airflow limitation.
PubMed ID
9187201 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of extrusion cooked cereal/legume weaning food supplements to Ghanaian mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195584
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2001 Jan;52(1):83-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
Y. Mensa-Wilmot
R D Phillips
S. Sefa-Dedeh
Author Affiliation
Center for Food Safety and Quality Enhancement-Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Agricultural Experiment Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797, USA.
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2001 Jan;52(1):83-90
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cereals
Chi-Square Distribution
Consumer Satisfaction
Dietary Supplements
Fabaceae
Female
Focus Groups
Food Handling
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Mothers
Plants, Medicinal
Software
Weaning
Abstract
Six cereal/legume mixtures were developed with the aid of computer-assisted optimization software from cereal and legume staples indigenous to the West African sub-region. The mixtures had 45-50% maize, 35-40% decorticated cowpeas and either blanched peanuts or decorticated soybeans as a source of lipid and complementary amino acids. Three processing schemes involving roasting, amylase digestion and extrusion cooking were employed. The proportion of ingredients in each cereal/legume blend was based on meeting the nutrient requirement of the 0.5-0.9-year-old infant and cost considerations. Nutrient composition of the blends (proximate, amino acid, mineral and vitamin composition) indicated that these formulations were adequate nutritionally as weaning supplements (Mensa-Wilmot et al, 2000a,2000b). These formulations were evaluated by mothers of weanling children based on their preferences with respect to color, flavor, texture and willingness to purchase the product assessed. A total of 133 one-on-one interviews and 23 group discussions were conducted (involving 6-12 respondents) with selected Ghanaian women. The mothers found the convenience of a weaning food made from local staples that could be processed on village/market scale very attractive.
PubMed ID
11225182 View in PubMed
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[A controlled trial of oat extract to break the tobacco habit in cigarette smokers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68125
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 Nov 14;139(46):2752-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-14-1977

Acrylamide-asparagine relationship in baked/toasted wheat and rye breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156290
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kit Granby
Nikoline Juul Nielsen
Rikke V Hedegaard
Tue Christensen
Mette Kann
Leif H Skibsted
Author Affiliation
Technical University of Denmark, National food Institute, Søborg, DK-2860, Denmark. kgr@food.dtu.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - analysis
Asparagine - analysis
Bread - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Flour
Food Technology - methods
Hot Temperature
Humans
Maillard Reaction
Risk Assessment - methods
Secale cereale
Triticum
Abstract
Acrylamide in baked and toasted wheat and rye bread was studied in relation to levels of asparagine in flour, dough, bread and toasts. Asparagine was consumed during bread preparation resulting in reduced acrylamide content in the products. In wheat bread, 12% of the asparagine initially present in the flour (0.14 g kg(-1)) remained after yeast fermentation and baking; for rye bread, 82% of asparagine remained after sourdough fermentation and baking. Asparagine present in untoasted wheat bread had totally reacted after hard toasting. Toasted wheat and rye bread slices contained 11-161 and 27-205 microg kg(-1) acrylamide, respectively, compared to untoasted wheat and rye bread with
PubMed ID
18608496 View in PubMed
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Acute symptoms following exposure to grain dust in farming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237190
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1986 Apr;66:73-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1986
Author
J. Manfreda
V. Holford-Strevens
M. Cheang
C P Warren
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1986 Apr;66:73-80
Date
Apr-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals - adverse effects
Dust - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Farmer's Lung - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests
Skin Tests
Smoking
Abstract
History of acute symptoms (cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, fever, stuffy nose, and skin itching/rash) following exposure to grain dust was obtained from 661 male and 535 female current and former farmers. These symptoms were relatively common: 60% of male and 25% of female farmers reported at least one such symptom on exposure to grain dust. Association of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and stuffy nose with skin reactivity and capacity to form IgE is consistent with an allergic nature of these symptoms. Barley and oats dust were perceived as dust most often producing symptoms. On the other hand, grain fever showed a different pattern, i.e., it was not associated with either skin reactivity or total IgE. Smoking might modify the susceptibility to react to grain dust with symptoms. Only those who reported wheezing on exposure to grain dust may have an increased risk to develop chronic airflow obstruction.
Notes
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PubMed ID
3709486 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of colonic fermentation and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion with increased wheat fibre intake for 1 year in hyperinsulinaemic human subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149233
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jan;103(1):82-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Kristin R Freeland
Charlotte Wilson
Thomas M S Wolever
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jan;103(1):82-90
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Carboxylic Acids - blood
Cereals
Colon - physiopathology
Dietary Fiber
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - blood - secretion
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - blood - diet therapy - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Male
Ontario
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Triticum
Abstract
High cereal fibre intake is associated with reduced risk for type 2 diabetes, but wheat fibre had little or no effect on glycaemic control or oral glucose tolerance in clinical trials lasting 4-12 weeks. To explain this discrepancy, we hypothesised that colonic adaptation to increased wheat fibre intake takes many months but eventually results in increased SCFA production and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. Thus, the primary objective was to determine the time-course of the effects of increased wheat fibre intake on plasma acetate, butyrate and GLP-1 concentrations in hyperinsulinaemic human subjects over 1 year. Subjects with fasting plasma insulin >or= 40 pmol/l were randomly assigned by computer to receive either a high-wheat fibre cereal (fibre group; 24 g fibre/d; twenty assigned; six dropped out, fourteen included) or a low-fibre cereal (control group; twenty assigned; six dropped-out, fourteen included) daily for 1 year. Acetate, butyrate and GLP-1 were measured during 8 h metabolic profiles performed every 3 months. There were no differences in body weight in the fibre group compared with the control group. After 9 months baseline-adjusted mean 8 h acetate and butyrate concentrations were higher on the high-fibre than the control cereal (P
PubMed ID
19664300 View in PubMed
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Addressing poor nutrition to promote heart health: moving upstream.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140561
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kim D Raine
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. kim.raine@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body mass index
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diet therapy - prevention & control
Cereals
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Dietary Fiber
Energy intake
Evidence-Based Medicine
Fatty acids
Fishes
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Policy
Nuts
Obesity - diet therapy - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Vegetables
Abstract
Current dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention suggest dietary patterns that promote achieving healthy weight, emphasize vegetables, legumes, fruit, whole grains, fish and nuts, substituting mono-unsaturated fats for saturated fats and restricting dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg/day. However, trends in nutrient intake and food consumption patterns suggest that the need for improvement in the dietary patterns of Canadians is clear. Influencing eating behaviour requires more than addressing nutrition knowledge and perceptions of healthy eating - it requires tackling the context within which individuals make choices. A comprehensive approach to improving nutrition includes traditional downstream strategies such as counselling to improve knowledge and skills; midstream strategies such as using the media to change social norms; and upstream strategies such as creating supportive environments through public policy including regulatory measures. While the evidence base for more upstream strategies continues to grow, key examples of comprehensive approaches to population change provide a call to action.
Notes
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2002;11 Suppl 9:S755-812656679
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Cites: Health Rep. 2007 May;18(2):47-5217578015
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Cites: Obes Rev. 2005 Feb;6(1):23-3315655036
PubMed ID
20847988 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 intakes from foods among Newfoundland and Labrador adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113239
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Peter Wang
Lin Liu
Christina Tucker
Barbara Roebothan
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):63-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Food, Fortified
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Niacin - administration & dosage - blood
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Recommended dietary allowances
Risk factors
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Adequacy of intake for niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 from food was estimated in an adult population in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Also considered was whether study findings support current Canadian food fortification policies.
Four hundred randomly selected adult NL residents were surveyed by telephone. Secondary analysis was performed on two 24-hour food recalls for each participant. Mean daily intakes of niacin, folate, and vitamin B12 were estimated from foods only and compared by sex/age subgroup. Adequacy of intakes was estimated. Contributions of folate by ready-to-eat cereal and bread products were also estimated.
Intakes of all three nutrients were higher in men. In comparison with recommendations, daily niacin intakes were as follows: excessive for 21.9% of all participants (and for 56.8% of men aged 28 to 54), within the recommended range for 73.6%, and less than adequate for 4.5%. In comparison with recommendations, daily folate intakes were as follows: within the recommended range for 18.1% of participants and less than adequate for 81.9%. In comparison with recommendations, daily vitamin B12 intakes were less than adequate for 36.3% of participants.
More than 20% of those surveyed were consuming, from food alone, niacin at levels above the maximum recommended. Food fortification policies pertaining to niacin should be revisited. In addition, despite fortification, NL adults may be consuming inadequate amounts of folate from foods.
PubMed ID
23750977 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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275 records – page 1 of 28.