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53 records – page 1 of 6.

Antigenic characteristics and cDNA sequences of HLA-B73.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64593
Source
Eur J Immunogenet. 1995 Jun;22(3):231-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
H J Hoffmann
T J Kristensen
T G Jensen
B. Graugaard
L U Lamm
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Immunology, Skejby University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Immunogenet. 1995 Jun;22(3):231-40
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Base Sequence
Cell Line, Transformed
Cercopithecus aethiops
DNA, Complementary - genetics
Denmark
Female
Gene Frequency
Genes, MHC Class I
HLA-B Antigens - chemistry - genetics - immunology
Histocompatibility testing
Humans
Isoantibodies - immunology - isolation & purification
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Mass Screening
Models, Molecular
Molecular Sequence Data
Parity
Paternity
Pregnancy
Protein Conformation
Recombinant Fusion Proteins - biosynthesis
Transfection
Trophoblasts - immunology
Abstract
The cDNA sequence and serological data for HLA-B73 are reported. Anti-B73 sera are found relatively frequently, considering the rarity of the antigen. It was noted early that in some cases the antibodies in sera of multiparous women did not react with the eliciting cells (fathers) and thus all behaved as a naturally occurring antibody. We report on 18 B73 antisera found during the screening of 55,000 Danish sera. Only one of the 17 stimulators typed also had the B73 tissue type. Ten of the stimulators had antigens from the B7 CREG (B7, B22, B27, B42, B67, B73), whereas none of the responders had such tissue types. In seven cases the serum was not able to react with the stimulator's lymphocytes in a cytotoxicity assay and in four cases the stimulator lymphocytes could not deplete the anti-B73 activity from the serum in absorption experiments. The cDNA of B73 was expressed correctly in COS cells and was recognized on the cell surface by a monospecific serum. The alpha 1 alpha 2 domains of B73 are most similar to those of the HLA-B22 family. Interestingly, the alpha 3 and transmembrane domains of HLA-B73 are not standard human domains, but are most similar to the corresponding domains of some gorilla and chimpanzee HLA-B genes.
PubMed ID
8547229 View in PubMed
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Approaches to immunization of infants and young children against gastroenteritis due to rotaviruses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245831
Source
Rev Infect Dis. 1980 May-Jun;2(3):459-69
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Z Kapikian
R G Wyatt
H B Greenberg
A R Kalica
H W Kim
C D Brandt
W J Rodriguez
R H Parrott
R M Chanock
Source
Rev Infect Dis. 1980 May-Jun;2(3):459-69
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Cercopithecus aethiops
Child
Child, Preschool
Developing Countries
District of Columbia
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Immunity
Immunization
Infant
Japan
Ontario
Reoviridae - immunology
Rotavirus - immunology
Sheep
Viral Vaccines - immunology - therapeutic use
Abstract
Recent studies have shown that in developed countries rotaviruses are the single most important etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis that requires hospitalization of infants and young children. Although deaths from gastroenteritis are, in general, infrequent in the developed countries, an effective rotavirus vaccine would clearly be of benefit to reduce the heavy toll of morbidity from gastroenteritis due to rotavirus. In the developing countries the impact of diarrheal diseases is staggering. It was recently estimated that in Asia, Africa, and Latin-America during a one-year period there would be 3.5 billion cases of diarrhea and 5-10 million deaths associated with diarrhea; in addition, diarrhea was ranked first in freqency in the categories of disease and mortality. In the developing countries rotaviruses are known to cause diarrhea, but their relative role in this high mortality rate is not yet known. epidemiologic data indicate that development of an effective rotavirus vaccine would reduce morbidity, and they suggest that a vaccine would also reduce a portion of the mortality from diarrheal disease. The prospects and approaches for the development of an effective rotavirus vaccine are presented. The recent successful propagation of rotavirus type 2 in cell culture represents an important step in this regard. In addition, the antigenic relation between human and animal strains offers another possible approach. The need for a live attenuated vaccine is indicated by the prime role played by local intestinal immunity in resistance to rotavirus disease.
PubMed ID
6251528 View in PubMed
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Association of topoisomerases I and II with the chromatin in SV40-infected monkey cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4138
Source
Virology. 1991 Mar;181(1):408-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
R. Rainwater
K. Mann
Author Affiliation
Biology Department, University of Alaska, Anchorage 99508.
Source
Virology. 1991 Mar;181(1):408-11
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cell Line
Cell Transformation, Viral
Cercopithecus aethiops
Chromatin - enzymology
DNA Topoisomerases, Type I - isolation & purification - metabolism
DNA Topoisomerases, Type II - isolation & purification - metabolism
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Immunoblotting
Molecular Weight
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Simian virus 40 - enzymology
Subcellular Fractions - enzymology
Abstract
The subcellular localization of topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II has been compared in Simian virus (SV40)-infected and uninfected TC7 monkey cells. In SV40-infected cells, both of these enzymes are preferentially associated with the chromatin. Some topoisomerase I is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas topoisomerase II shows no such association. In uninfected TC7 cells, topoisomerase I is present in both the chromatin and nuclear matrix fractions. Topoisomerase II, on the other hand, is not detected in any of the subcellular fractions of uninfected cells. After SV40 infection, there is a marked increase in the level of chromatin-associated topoisomerase II.
PubMed ID
1847264 View in PubMed
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Astrakhan fever rickettsiae: antigenic and genotypic analysis of isolates obtained from human and Rhipicephalus pumilio ticks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216944
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1994 Nov;51(5):697-706
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
M E Eremeeva
L. Beati
V A Makarova
N F Fetisova
I V Tarasevich
N M Balayeva
D. Raoult
Author Affiliation
Unite des Rickettsies, Faculte de Medecine, Marseille France.
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1994 Nov;51(5):697-706
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Bacterial Proteins - analysis
Boutonneuse Fever - microbiology
Cercopithecus aethiops
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Female
Genotype
Humans
Immunoblotting
Male
Mice
Microscopy, Electron
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Russia
Serotyping
Ticks - microbiology
Vero Cells
Abstract
Two spotted fever group rickettsia strains, A-108 and A-167, were isolated from the hemolymph of Rhipicephalus pumilio ticks collected in the Astrakhan region of Russia, which is area endemic for Astrakhan fever. These tick isolates were compared with a strain isolated from a patient suffering from Astrakhan fever and with reference spotted fever group rickettsiae strains. New tick isolates and the human strain were identical in their serologic, antigenic, and genetic characteristics by several methods: microimmunofluorescence, protein gel electrophoresis with immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction endonuclease fragment length polymorphism analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Astrakhan fever rickettsiae were found to be serologically and antigenically similar to Israeli spotted fever rickettsiae. Both of them probably belong to a single Rickettsia conorii pathotype complex. Only PFGE pattern analysis could clearly discriminate Astrakhan fever rickettsiae from other isolates.
PubMed ID
7985764 View in PubMed
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Biological and genetic characterization of Rickettsia sibirica strains isolated in the endemic area of the north Asian tick typhus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210437
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1996 Dec;55(6):685-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
N M Balayeva
M E Eremeeva
V F Ignatovich
N V Rudakov
T A Reschetnikova
I E Samoilenko
V K Yastrebov
D. Raoult
Author Affiliation
Unite des Rickettsies, Faculte de Medecine, Marseille, France.
Source
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1996 Dec;55(6):685-92
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachnid Vectors - microbiology
Cercopithecus aethiops
Chick Embryo
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Genome, Viral
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Rickettsia - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Rickettsia Infections - microbiology - transmission
Russia
Ticks - microbiology
Vero Cells
Virulence
Abstract
Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified gene fragments was used to characterize 24 isolates of spotted fever group rickettsiae previously identified as Rickettsia sibirica from their serologic properties. These strains were obtained in Russia between 1946 and 1991 from humans and different species of Ixodid ticks. The RFLP analysis was performed using amplified DNA products obtained with a genus-specific primer pair derived from the R. prowazekii citrate synthase gene and two group-specific primer pairs from the R. rickettsii 190-kD and 120-kD surface protein antigen genes followed by Alu I, Pst I, and Rsa I restriction endonuclease digestions. Although some differences were detected in biological characteristics among the examined strains, only a single R. sibirica genotype was found with these molecular tools of identification.
PubMed ID
9025699 View in PubMed
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Campylobacter concisus: an evaluation of certain phenotypic and genotypic characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175791
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2005 Apr;11(4):288-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
J. Engberg
D D Bang
R. Aabenhus
F M Aarestrup
V. Fussing
P. Gerner-Smidt
Author Affiliation
Unit of Gastrointestinal Infections, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. eng@ssi.dk
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2005 Apr;11(4):288-95
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Toxins - genetics
Campylobacter - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Campylobacter Infections - microbiology
Carrier State - microbiology
Cercopithecus aethiops
Cytotoxins - genetics
Denmark
Diarrhea - microbiology
Humans
Phenotype
RNA, Ribosomal, 23S - genetics
Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique
Ribotyping
Vero Cells
Abstract
The clinical relevance of Campylobacter concisus in gastrointestinal disease has not been determined definitively. This study investigated the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of 39 C. concisus isolates from Danish patients with diarrhoea, three isolates from healthy individuals and the type strain. A cytolethal distending toxin (CDT)-like effect on Vero cells was observed in 35 (90%) isolates from patients with diarrhoea, in all three isolates from healthy individuals and in the type strain. Analysis of SDS-PAGE protein profiles and PCR amplification of 23S rDNA assigned the isolates into two distinct, but discordant groups. Automated ribotyping (RiboPrinting) identified 34 distinct patterns among the 43 isolates, but cluster analysis did not separate isolates from patients with diarrhoea from isolates from healthy patients. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis with three primers identified 37 unique profiles, but requires further evaluation. The isolates obtained from healthy carriers were distinguished by cluster analysis from the isolates obtained from patients with diarrhoea. All the isolates were susceptible to 11 antimicrobial agents tested. Overall, there was considerable variability between the C. concisus isolates, but there were no clear phenotypic or genotypic differences between isolates from patients with diarrhoea and isolates from healthy carriers. Further evidence is needed to support the possible role of C. concisus as a human enteric pathogen.
PubMed ID
15760425 View in PubMed
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Characterisation of a non-haemolytic enterotoxin complex from Bacillus cereus isolated after a foodborne outbreak.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75594
Source
FEMS Microbiol Lett. 1996 Aug 1;141(2-3):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1996
Author
T. Lund
P E Granum
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, Microbiology and Food Hygiene, Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine, Oslo, Norway.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Lett. 1996 Aug 1;141(2-3):151-6
Date
Aug-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Bacillus cereus - chemistry
Bacterial Proteins - chemistry - metabolism
Base Sequence
Blotting, Western
Cercopithecus aethiops
Enterotoxins - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Food Poisoning - etiology
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vero Cells
Abstract
Three enterotoxic components have been isolated from a strain of Bacillus cereus which was involved in a large food poisoning outbreak in Norway in 1995. The components were purified by chromatography on three different columns. Three proteins of 39, 45 and 105 kDa, respectively, were found to be necessary for maximum cytotoxicity. The amino acid N-terminal sequences of the 39 and 45 kDa proteins were determined. The 45 kDa component was the same protein as the main antigen detected in the Bacillus Diarrhoeal Enterotoxin Visual Immunoassay (Tecra). The 39 kDa protein showed some similarity to the L1 protein of haemolysin BL from B. cereus. Furthermore, the three toxic components were all recognised by a polyclonal antiserum reported to detect enterotoxin from B. cereus. The proteins were different from the B- and L2-components of haemolysin BL, previously suggested to be a primary virulence factor, and had no detectable haemolytic activity.
PubMed ID
8768516 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of parotitis virus, isolated in Siberia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34093
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1997 Sep-Oct;42(5):222-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A P Agafonov
S N Nicheukhina
N A Patrushev
S I Denisov
S P Orlovskaia
E I Riabchikova
V M Blinov
G M Ignat'ev
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1997 Sep-Oct;42(5):222-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cercopithecus aethiops
Child
Disease Outbreaks
English Abstract
Humans
Microscopy, Electron
Mumps - epidemiology - virology
Mumps virus - genetics - isolation & purification - ultrastructure
RNA, Viral
Siberia - epidemiology
Species Specificity
Vero Cells
Abstract
Two strains of parotitis virus were isolated from patients with clinical symptoms of the disease in epidemiological screening which was carried out during an outbreak of epidemic parotitis in the village of Koltsovo in 1994. The strains were isolated from the saliva of children aged 7 and 8 years vaccinated with live parotitis vaccine at the age of 1.5 years. Primers for the genome site coding for the gene F terminal and the SH gene (a total of 509 n. p.) were estimated and synthesized and the site was amplified. Electron-microscopic examination of purified virus and Vero cells infected with it and serological tests showed a similarity of the newly isolated virus with the Anders strain of parotitis virus. The Dragun-1 and Dragun-2 strains of parotitis virus have been deposited in the collection of viruses at the Vektor State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology in the village of Koltsovo, Novosibirsk district.
PubMed ID
9424848 View in PubMed
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Characterization of tick-borne encephalitis virus from Latvia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49223
Source
J Med Virol. 2000 Feb;60(2):216-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
V. Mavtchoutko
S. Vene
M. Haglund
M. Forsgren
A. Duks
V. Kalnina
J. Hörling
A. Lundkvist
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Health Centre, Riga, Latvia.
Source
J Med Virol. 2000 Feb;60(2):216-22
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Arvicolinae
Brain - virology
Cercopithecus aethiops
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - immunology - virology
Female
Humans
Latvia
Mice
Mice, Inbred Strains
Phylogeny
RNA, Viral - analysis
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Alignment
Serologic Tests
Vero Cells
Viral Envelope Proteins - analysis - genetics - immunology
Virulence
Abstract
Viruses of the tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) antigenic complex, within the family Flaviviridae, cause a variety of diseases including uncomplicated febrile illness, encephalitis, meningo-encephalitis, hemorrhagic fever and chronic disease in humans, domesticated animals or wildlife species. TBE is a serious problem in Latvia with up to a 1,000 patients confirmed serologically annually 1994-1995. No previous data had been reported on the causative agent of TBE in Latvia. In the present study, a virus was isolated from serum of a patient with clinical symptoms of an acute TBE infection. Nucleotide sequence information obtained by direct reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the serological characteristics of the isolated virus strain, designated TBE-Latvia-1-96, indicated a closer relationship to the Vasilchenko strain, isolated in Novosibirsk (Siberia, Russia), as compared to the western European or far eastern subtypes of TBE viruses. In a mouse neurovirulence assay, a significant difference in survival rates (days) was shown between Latvia-1-96 and the western European TBE virus subtype.
PubMed ID
10596024 View in PubMed
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53 records – page 1 of 6.