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Childhood central nervous system viral infections and adult schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185142
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2003 Jun;160(6):1183-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Jaana Suvisaari
Nicolas Mautemps
Jari Haukka
Tapani Hovi
Jouko Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research and the Deparment of Virology, National Puablic Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. jaana.suvisaari@ktl.fi
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2003 Jun;160(6):1183-5
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Central Nervous System Viral Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Enterovirus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
An earlier Finnish cohort study suggested that childhood viral CNS infections are associated with a fivefold increased odds of developing schizophrenia in adulthood. The authors sought to replicate this finding.
From the archives of the Department of Virology of the National Public Health Institute in Finland, 320 individuals born between 1960 and 1976 who had suffered virologically confirmed CNS infections before their 15th birthdays were identified. Of the infections, 202 had been caused by enteroviruses. The sample was followed up in the 1969-2000 records of the National Hospital Discharge Register of Finland to identify all cases of schizophrenia that emerged.
The cumulative incidence of schizophrenia was 0.94% in the whole sample and 0.99% among individuals who had suffered enteroviral infections. These rates are comparable to that found in the general population.
Childhood viral CNS infections were not associated with increased risk of schizophrenia.
PubMed ID
12777282 View in PubMed
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Infections in the CNS during childhood and the risk of subsequent psychotic illness: a cohort study of more than one million Swedish subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87603
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;165(1):59-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Dalman Christina
Allebeck Peter
Gunnell David
Harrison Glyn
Kristensson Krister
Lewis Glyn
Lofving Sofia
Rasmussen Finn
Wicks Susanne
Karlsson Håkan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatric Epidemiology, EPI/Karolinska Institutet, Norrbacka pl 5, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. christina.dalman@sll.se
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;165(1):59-65
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Central Nervous System Bacterial Infections - complications - epidemiology
Central Nervous System Infections - complications - epidemiology
Central Nervous System Viral Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Infections during early life have been suggested to play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Most studies have focused on fetal life; few have explored risk associated with infection during childhood. The results of these have been inconsistent. The present study aims to investigate whether there is an increased risk of schizophrenia and other nonaffective psychoses associated with viral or bacterial CNS infections during childhood and, if so, which specific agents are involved. METHOD: A national cohort consisting of 1.2 million children born between 1973 and 1985 was followed up by using Swedish national registers to retrieve data on hospital admissions for CNS infections at 0-12 years of age (bacterial: N=2,435, viral: N=6,550) as well as admissions for nonaffective psychotic illnesses from the 14th birthday (N=2,269). RESULTS: There was a slightly increased risk of nonaffective psychotic illness associated with viral CNS infections, as well as schizophrenia. There was no evidence of increased risk in relation to bacterial infections. When divided into specific agents, exposures to mumps virus or cytomegalovirus were associated with subsequent psychoses. CONCLUSIONS: Serious viral CNS infections during childhood appear to be associated with the later development of schizophrenia and nonaffective psychoses. The association with specific viruses suggests that the risk is related to infectious agents with a propensity to invade the brain parenchyma.
PubMed ID
18056223 View in PubMed
Less detail