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20 records – page 1 of 2.

[Analysis of fatal cases and irreversible CNS injuries as complications of anesthetic maintenance].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149247
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2009 May-Jun;(3):14-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V L Vinogradov
V V Likhvantsev
V A Lianenko
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2009 May-Jun;(3):14-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anesthesia - adverse effects - mortality
Central Nervous System Diseases - etiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Forensic Pathology
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant
Male
Medical Errors - mortality
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors made a retrospective analysis of the 1988-2007 forensic medical examinations. They selected 45 fatal cases and 9 cases of severe irreversible CNS injuries occurring within 30 days after surgery as absolute complications due to anesthetic maintenance and postoperative management. Among the victims there were 7 children and 47 adults. In each case concerned, an attempt was made to reveal all critical incidents and factors associated with an evolving fatal outcome and it was suggested that a poor outcome could be prevented. It was noted that the most critical incidents resulting in death or severe irreversible CNS injuries were associated with respiratory disorders. These incidents were most frequently observed in the induction of anesthesia when tracheal intubation was attempted and in the early period (within 2 hours) after surgery. The most common associated factors should include inadequate preparation of a patient for surgery, improper medical care in the early postoperative period, and unavailability of automatic monitoring systems. It was ascertained that there was a potential for the prevention of death in most cases (53/54).
PubMed ID
19663217 View in PubMed
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Association of Anesthesia and Surgery During Childhood With Long-term Academic Performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282984
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2017 Jan 02;171(1):e163470
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-02-2017
Author
Pia Glatz
Rolf H Sandin
Nancy L Pedersen
Anna-Karin Bonamy
Lars I Eriksson
Fredrik Granath
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2017 Jan 02;171(1):e163470
Date
Jan-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anesthesia, General - adverse effects
Anesthetics - adverse effects
Central Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Child
Child Development - drug effects
Child, Preschool
Cognition - drug effects - physiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence Tests
Male
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
The results of preclinical studies suggest that anesthetic drugs administered to neonatal animals cause widespread neuronal apoptosis and later neurocognitive impairment. Adequately powered studies in the pediatric surgical population are scarce, and it is unclear whether such preclinical findings are relevant for the pediatric setting.
To examine the association of anesthesia and surgery before age 4 years with long-term academic and cognitive performance indexed by school grades at age 16 years and IQ test scores at military conscription.
This investigation was a cohort study among all children born in Sweden between January 1973 and December 1993. The dates of analysis were April 2013 to October 2015. Among all 2?174?073 Swedish children born between 1973 and 1993, we identified a primary study cohort of 33?514 children with 1 anesthesia and surgery exposure before age 4 years and no subsequent hospitalization and 159?619 matched unexposed control children. In addition, 3640 children with multiple surgical procedures before age 4 years were studied.
Having at least 1 surgical procedure in the Swedish Patient Register before age 4 years.
The mean school grades at age 16 years and IQ test scores at military conscription at age 18 years. The mean difference between the exposed cohort and unexposed cohort was estimated in a model that included sex, month of birth during the same year, gestational age at delivery, Apgar score at 5 minutes, maternal and paternal educational levels, annual taxable household income, cohabiting parents, and number of siblings.
Among 33?514 exposed children (22?484 male and 11?030 female) and 159?619 unexposed children (105?812 male and 53?807 female) in the primary study cohort, 1 exposure before age 4 years was associated with a mean difference of 0.41% (95% CI, 0.12%-0.70%) lower school grades and 0.97% (95% CI, 0.15%-1.78%) lower IQ test scores. The magnitude of the difference was the same after multiple exposures. There was no difference in school grades with 1 exposure before ages 6 months, 7 to 12 months, 13 to 24 months, or 25 to 36 months. The overall difference was markedly less than the differences associated with sex, maternal educational level, or month of birth during the same year.
Exposure to anesthesia and surgery before age 4 years has a small association with later academic performance or cognitive performance in adolescence on a population level. While more vulnerable subgroups of children may exist, the low overall difference in academic performance after childhood exposure to surgery is reassuring. These findings should be interpreted in light of potential adverse effects of postponing surgery.
PubMed ID
27820621 View in PubMed
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Clinical profile and prevalence of fetal alcohol syndrome in an isolated community in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234920
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Aug 1;137(3):203-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1987
Author
G C Robinson
J L Conry
R F Conry
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Aug 1;137(3):203-7
Date
Aug-1-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Central Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis
Educational Measurement
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Growth Disorders - etiology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intellectual Disability - etiology
Intelligence Tests
Interview, Psychological
Male
Pregnancy
Abstract
The authors were invited by the band council to carry out a study to determine the prevalence of alcohol embryopathy among children in a native Indian community in British Columbia. The mothers of the 123 children aged 18 years or less who lived in the community were interviewed. In addition, educational screening was carried out for children in grades 1 through 12, and 116 of the children underwent medical examination. A diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol effects (FAS/FAE) was made in 22 children aged 3 to 18 years. Each of these children was matched for age and sex with an unaffected child in the same community, and both groups underwent psychoeducational testing. The children with FAS/FAE showed a generalized depressed level of functioning compared with the unaffected children. The finding that two thirds of the children with FAS/FAE were mentally retarded points to a major health and education problem.
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1978 Mar;92(3):457-60632992
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1978 May 11;298(19):1063-7347295
Cites: Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:112-21291283
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1980 Apr;4(2):119-226990814
Cites: Monogr Am Assoc Ment Defic. 1987;(8):1-323614265
Cites: Subst Alcohol Actions Misuse. 1983;4(2-3):149-736648758
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1984 Mar;119(3):301-86702808
Cites: Soc Biol. 1983 Winter;30(4):374-876336013
Cites: Lancet. 1985 Jul 13;2(8446):85-912861535
Cites: Nouv Presse Med. 1981 Sep 12;10(32):2639-437279648
PubMed ID
3607663 View in PubMed
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Generalized amyloid in a family of Swedish origin. A study of 426 family members in seven generations of a new kinship with neuropathy, nephropathy, and central nervous system involvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56074
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1977 Apr;86(4):419-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1977
Author
M D Benson
A S Cohen
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1977 Apr;86(4):419-24
Date
Apr-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amyloid - metabolism
Amyloidosis - complications - diagnosis - genetics
Central Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Cerebral Cortex - pathology
Gastrointestinal Diseases - etiology
Heart Diseases - etiology
Humans
Kidney Diseases - etiology
Male
Meninges - pathology
Myocardium - pathology
Pedigree
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sural Nerve - pathology
Sweden - ethnology
United States
Abstract
We report a new kinship with systemic amyloid presenting as peripheral neuropathy in the fourth and fifth decades of life. A progressive sensory and motor loss starting in the lower extremities occurs from this disease, and there is subsequent renal, cardiac, gastrointestinal, ocular, and cutaneous involvement. Histologic studies show that amyloid deposition is mainly in connective tissue structures; there is an unusual infiltration of the meninges and central nervous system. Review of records of 426 family members in seven generations showed that this disease is inherited as an autosomal dominant. The absence of immunoglobulin disorders in two affected family members studied in depth suggests that this is not the primary type of amyloid in which the deposits are composed of fragments of immunoglobulin light chains. Similarly the absence of elevated levels of protein SAA (the serum precursor of secondary amyloid) suggests that this is not a secondary form of amyloid.
PubMed ID
192115 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.