Skip header and navigation

Refine By

507 records – page 1 of 51.

6-Hydroxycleroda-3,13-dien-15,16-olide protects neuronal cells from lipopolysaccharide-induced neurotoxicity through the inhibition of microglia-mediated inflammation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149311
Source
Planta Med. 2010 Feb;76(2):120-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Yu-Tzu Shih
Ya-Yun Hsu
Fang-Rong Chang
Yang-Chang Wu
Yi-Ching Lo
Author Affiliation
Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
Source
Planta Med. 2010 Feb;76(2):120-7
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - isolation & purification - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Cell Death - drug effects
Cell Line, Tumor
Diterpenes - isolation & purification - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Humans
Inflammation - prevention & control
Inflammation Mediators - metabolism
Lipopolysaccharides
Microglia - drug effects
Neurons - drug effects
Neurotoxicity Syndromes - prevention & control
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - chemistry - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Polyalthia - chemistry
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Abstract
Polyalthia longifolia var. pendula is used as an antipyretic agent in indigenous systems of medicine. Microglia-mediated inflammation plays an important role in the pathway leading to neuronal cell death in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 6-hydroxycleroda-3,13-dien-15,16-olide (PL3) extracted from Polyalthia longifolia var. pendula on lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-induced inflammation in microglia-like HAPI cells and primary microglia cultures. In microglia-neuron co-cultures, LPS decreased the cell viability of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. LPS-induced cell death was attenuated by the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, the COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398 or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, DPI, respectively. In LPS-treated microglia cells, PL3 decreased the expression of iNOS, COX-2, gp91 (phox), and NF- kappaBp65, the degradation of I kappaB alpha, and the production of NO, PGE (2), iROS, and TNF- alpha. PL3 also enhanced the expression of HO-1, a cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory enzyme. Moreover, PL3 reduced LPS-activated microglia-induced cell death. The present results suggest that PL3 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation and inflammation-related neuronal cell death. Therefore, PL3 has potential use for the treatment of inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases.
PubMed ID
19653144 View in PubMed
Less detail

17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18539
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2002 Dec;83(1-5):119-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
P. Vihko
P. Härkönen
O. Oduwole
S. Törn
R. Kurkela
K. Porvari
A. Pulkka
V. Isomaa
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu and Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland. pvihko@whoccr.oulu.fi
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2002 Dec;83(1-5):119-22
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - metabolism
Breast Neoplasms - enzymology
Cell Line
Colonic Neoplasms - enzymology - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - enzymology
Oxygen - metabolism
Prostatic Neoplasms - enzymology
Protein Isoforms
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
17 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSDs) catalyze the interconversions between active 17 beta-hydroxysteroids and less-active 17-ketosteroids thereby affecting the availability of biologically active estrogens and androgens in a variety of tissues. The enzymes have different enzymatic properties and characteristic cell-specific expression patterns, suggesting differential physiological functions for the enzymes. Epidemiological and endocrine evidence indicate that estrogens play a key role in the etiology of breast cancer while androgens are involved in mechanisms controlling the growth of prostatic cells, both normal and malignant. Recently, we have developed, using LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines, a cell model to study the progression of prostate cancer. In the model LNCaP cells are transformed in culture condition to more aggressive cells, able to grow in suspension cultures. Our results suggest that substantial changes in androgen and estrogen metabolism occur in the cells during the process. These changes lead to increased production of active estrogens during transformation of the cells. Data from studies of breast cell lines and tissues suggest that the oxidative 17HSD type 2 may predominate in human non-malignant breast epithelial cells, while the reductive 17HSD type 1 activity prevails in malignant cells. Deprivation of an estrogen response by using specific 17HSD type 1 inhibitors is a tempting approach to treat estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Our recent studies demonstrate that in addition to sex hormone target tissues, estrogens may be important in the development of cancer in some other tissues previously not considered as estrogen target tissues such as colon. Our data show that the abundant expression of 17HSD type 2 present in normal colonic mucosa is significantly decreased during colon cancer development.
PubMed ID
12650708 View in PubMed
Less detail

ABCG2/BCRP decreases the transfer of a food-born chemical carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in perfused term human placenta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92634
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2008 Oct 15;232(2):210-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2008
Author
Myllynen Päivi
Kummu Maria
Kangas Tiina
Ilves Mika
Immonen Elina
Rysä Jaana
Pirilä Rauna
Lastumäki Anni
Vähäkangas Kirsi H
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland. paivi.myllynen@oulu.fi
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2008 Oct 15;232(2):210-7
Date
Oct-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters - physiology
Carcinogens - metabolism - toxicity
Cell Line, Tumor
Drug Resistance, Multiple - physiology
Female
Food - toxicity
Humans
Imidazoles - metabolism - toxicity
Maternal-Fetal Exchange - physiology
Neoplasm Proteins - physiology
Perfusion - methods
Placenta - drug effects - metabolism
Pregnancy
Abstract
We have studied the role of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters in fetal exposure to carcinogens using 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) a known substrate for ABC transporters as a model compound. In perfusion of human term placenta, transfer of (14)C-PhIP (2 microM) through the placenta resulted in fetal-to-maternal concentration ratio (FM ratio) of 0.72+/-0.09 at 6 h. The specific ABCG2 inhibitor KO143 increased the transfer of (14)C-PhIP from maternal to fetal circulation (FM ratio 0.90+/-0.08 at 6 h, p
PubMed ID
18680760 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aberrant iNOS signaling is under genetic control in rodent liver cancer and potentially prognostic for the human disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92898
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2008 Aug;29(8):1639-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Calvisi Diego F
Pinna Federico
Ladu Sara
Pellegrino Rossella
Muroni Maria R
Simile Maria M
Frau Maddalena
Tomasi Maria L
De Miglio Maria R
Seddaiu Maria A
Daino Lucia
Sanna Valeria
Feo Francesco
Pascale Rosa M
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Division of Experimental Pathology and Oncology, University of Sassari, 07100 Sassari, Italy.
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2008 Aug;29(8):1639-47
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Cell Line, Tumor
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Male
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II - genetics
Prognosis
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Signal Transduction - physiology
Abstract
Mounting evidence underlines the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development, but its functional interactions with pathways involved in HCC progression remain uninvestigated. Here, we analyzed in preneoplastic and neoplastic livers from Fisher 344 and Brown Norway rats, possessing different genetic predisposition to HCC, in transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) and c-Myc-TGF-alpha transgenic mice, characterized by different susceptibility to HCC, and in human HCC: (i) iNOS function and interactions with nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) and Ha-RAS/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) during hepatocarcinogenesis; (ii) influence of genetic predisposition to liver cancer on these pathways and role of these cascades in determining a susceptible or resistant phenotype and (iii) iNOS prognostic value in human HCC. We found progressive iNos induction in rat and mouse liver lesions, always at higher levels in the most aggressive models represented by HCC of rats genetically susceptible to hepatocarcinogenesis and c-Myc-TGF-alpha transgenic mice. iNOS, inhibitor of kB kinase/NF-kB and RAS/ERK upregulation was significantly higher in HCC with poorer prognosis (as defined by patients' survival length) and positively correlated with tumor proliferation, genomic instability and microvascularization and negatively with apoptosis. Suppression of iNOS signaling by aminoguanidine led to decreased HCC growth and NF-kB and RAS/ERK expression and increased apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. Conversely, block of NF-kB signaling by sulfasalazine or short interfering RNA (siRNA) or ERK signaling by UO126 caused iNOS downregulation in HCC cell lines. These findings indicate that iNOS cross talk with NF-kB and Ha-RAS/ERK cascades influences HCC growth and prognosis, suggesting that key component of iNOS signaling could represent important therapeutic targets for human HCC.
PubMed ID
18579559 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acception of cholesterol from cells in men of the Russian population correlates with concentration of pre-beta1 high-density lipoproteins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182095
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2003 Oct;136(4):366-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
A P Serdyuk
K. Lasselin
G. Castro
O A Litinskaya
G. Frushar
V A Metel'skaya
Author Affiliation
Department of Metabolic Disorders, State Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Russian Ministry of Health, Moscow. vicamet@orc.ru
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2003 Oct;136(4):366-8
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - chemistry
Cell Line, Tumor
Chemical Fractionation
Cholesterol - blood - chemistry - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood - chemistry - isolation & purification
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Phosphatidylcholine-Sterol O-Acyltransferase - blood
Rats
Russia - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
We analyzed subfraction composition of HDL and cholesterol-acceptor properties of the plasma in Russian men with high and low HDL cholesterol. HDL were subfractionated by two-dimensional electrophoresis in agarose-polyacrylamide gel. The content of pre-beta1 HDL increased in individuals with high concentration of HDL cholesterol and strictly correlated with acception of cellular cholesterol in both groups.
PubMed ID
14714084 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acylated pregnane glycosides from Caralluma quadrangula.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117305
Source
Phytochemistry. 2013 Apr;88:54-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Hossam M Abdallah
Abdel-Moneim M Osman
Hussein Almehdar
Essam Abdel-Sattar
Author Affiliation
Department of Natural Products and Alternative Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.
Source
Phytochemistry. 2013 Apr;88:54-60
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acylation
Antineoplastic Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Asclepiadaceae - chemistry
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Survival - drug effects
Chloroform - chemistry
Female
Glycosides - chemistry - pharmacology
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Molecular Structure
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Pregnanes - chemistry - pharmacology
Abstract
In a previous study, the methanolic extract as well as the chloroform fraction of the aerial parts of Caralluma quadrangula (Forssk.) N.E.Br. indigenous to Saudi Arabia showed significant in vitro cytotoxic activity against breast cancer (MCF7) cell line. In a biologically-guided fractionation approach, four acylated pregnane glycosides were isolated from the chloroform fraction of C. quadrangula. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by the analysis of their MS and NMR data. The compounds were identified as 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-ß-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-canaropyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-cymaropyranoside (1), 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-ß-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-canaropyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-cymaropyranoside (2), 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-ß-D-glucopyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-canaropyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-cymaropyranoside (3) and 12,20-di-O-benzoyl-3ß,5a,12ß,14ß,20-pentahydroxy-(20R)-pregn-6-ene 3-O-ß-D-glucopyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-canaropyranosyl-(1?4)-ß-D-cymaropyranoside (4). The isolated compounds were tested for their cytotoxic activity against breast cancer (MCF7) cell line.
PubMed ID
23312459 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adenosine triphosphate-dependence of volume sensitive chloride current in LNCaP cell line of human prostate cancer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17110
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(1):51-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
P M Lazarenko
N Kh Pohoriela
Ia M Shuba
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(1):51-61
Date
2005
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Triphosphate - pharmacology
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Membrane - drug effects - metabolism
Cell Size - drug effects
Chloride Channels - metabolism
Cytosol - drug effects - metabolism
English Abstract
Humans
Magnesium Chloride - pharmacology
Male
Patch-Clamp Techniques
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology
Abstract
Although sensitivity to intracellular ATP is considered to be one of the hallmarks of swelling activated Cl- current (I(Cl,swell)) involved in regulatory volume decrease (RVD) following hypotonic stress, the type and manner of such sensitivity seems to vary in different cell types. Here by using whole-cell patch-clamp recording we investigated ATP sensitivity of I(Cl,swell) in LNCaP human prostate cancer cell line. Suppression of endogenous ATP production with metabolic inhibitors (oligomycin, iodoacetate and rotenone) during cell dialysis with ATP- and Mg2+-free pipette solution did not prevent I(Cl,swell) in response to hypotonic exposure. However, supplementing this solution with 5 mM Na-ATP led to the development of I(Cl,swell) with nearly 305 higher density and less pronounced voltage-dependent inactivation (manifested mainly by the increase of non-inactivated current component) at positive potentials. On the contrary, inclusion of 1 mM Mg2+ in the patch pipette resulted in even smaller I(Cl,swell) (30% lower density compared to Mg2+-free conditions), which inactivated completely on prolonged depolarization. The presence of 5 mM Mg-ATP in the pipette did not affect I(Cl,swell) density. Neither intervention significantly altered the rate of I(Cl,swell) development in response to hypotonicity. We conclude that intracellular ATP, a positive modulator of I(Cl,swell)-carrying volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) in LNCaP cells most likely acts via binding rather than hydrolysis and/or phosphorylation reactions, whereas intracellular Mg2+ is VRAC inhibitor.
PubMed ID
15801200 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adipose and Circulating CCL18 Levels Associate With Metabolic Risk Factors in Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283211
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Nov;101(11):4021-4029
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Daniel Eriksson Hogling
Paul Petrus
Hui Gao
Jesper Bäckdahl
Ingrid Dahlman
Jurga Laurencikiene
Juan Acosta
Anna Ehrlund
Erik Näslund
Agne Kulyte
Niklas Mejhert
Daniel P Andersson
Peter Arner
Mikael Rydén
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Nov;101(11):4021-4029
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Biomarkers - blood - metabolism
Body mass index
Cell Line
Cells, Cultured
Chemokines, CC - blood - genetics - metabolism - secretion
Cohort Studies
Female
Gene Expression Regulation
Gene Ontology
Humans
Hypertriglyceridemia - etiology
Insulin Resistance
Macrophages - immunology - metabolism - pathology - secretion
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity, Morbid - immunology - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Panniculitis - etiology
Recombinant Proteins - metabolism
Risk factors
Subcutaneous Fat, Abdominal - immunology - metabolism - pathology - secretion
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cardiometabolic complications in obesity may be linked to white adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction. Transcriptomic studies of Sc WAT have reported that CCL18, encoding the CC chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18), is increased in obesity/insulin resistance but its functional role is unknown.
Our objectives were to determine if CCL18 is secreted from Sc WAT and if secreted and/or serum levels associate with metabolic phenotypes. We also planned to define the primary cellular source and if CCL18 exerts effects on adipocytes.
This is a cohort study.
The study took place in an outpatient academic clinic.
A total of 130 obese women scheduled for bariatric surgery and 35 nonobese controls were included.
Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp or homeostasis model assessment. CCL18 was analyzed in serum/WAT incubates by ELISA. Effects of recombinant CCL18 was determined in cultures of primary human adipocytes and the monocyte cell line THP-1 differentiated into M0/M1/M2 macrophages.
Association with metabolic risk factors was measured.
CCL18 was secreted from WAT and the levels correlated positively with insulin resistance, Adult Treatment Panel III risk score and plasma triglycerides, independent of body mass index and better than other established adipocytokines. In 80 obese women, S-CCL18 levels were significantly higher in insulin resistant compared with insulin sensitive subjects. In WAT CCL18 mRNA was expressed in macrophages and correlated positively with immune-related genes, particularly those enriched in M2 macrophages. While CCL18 increased cyto-/chemokine expression in M0/M2-THP-1 cells, human adipocytes showed no responses in vitro.
Circulating and WAT-secreted CCL18 correlates with insulin resistance and metabolic risk score. Because CCL18 is macrophage-specific and associates with adipose immune gene expression, it may constitute a marker of WAT inflammation.
PubMed ID
27459538 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse effects of Sudanese toombak vs. Swedish snuff on human oral cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98857
Source
J Oral Pathol Med. 2010 Feb;39(2):128-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Daniela Elena Costea
Ochiba Lukandu
Linh Bui
Muna Jaffar M Ibrahim
Raymond Lygre
Evelyn Neppelberg
Salah Osman Ibrahim
Olav Karsten Vintermyr
Anne Christine Johannessen
Author Affiliation
Section of Pathology, The Gade Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. daniela.costea@gades.uib.no
Source
J Oral Pathol Med. 2010 Feb;39(2):128-40
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Annexin A5 - analysis
Apoptosis - drug effects
Cell Count
Cell Division - drug effects
Cell Line
Cell Proliferation - drug effects
Cell Shape - drug effects
Cell Survival - drug effects
Cells, Cultured
Coloring Agents - diagnostic use
DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded
Fibroblasts - cytology - drug effects
G2 Phase - drug effects
Humans
Keratinocytes - cytology - drug effects
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission
Mouth Mucosa - cytology - drug effects
Phosphatidylserines - analysis
Plant Extracts - adverse effects
Sudan
Sweden
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The high incidence of oral cancer in Sudan has been associated with the use of toombak, the local type of smokeless tobacco. However, its specific effects on human oral cells are not known. We aimed to investigate the effects of toombak on primary normal human oral keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and a dysplastic oral keratinocytic cell line, and to compare them with the effects induced by Swedish snuff. METHOD: Aqueous extracts were prepared from moist toombak and Swedish snuff and added in serial dilutions on in vitro monolayer cultured cells. Cell viability, morphology and growth, DNA double-strand breaks (gammaH2AX staining), expression of phosphatidylserine (Annexin V staining), and cell cycle were assessed after various exposure time periods. RESULTS: Significant decrease in cell number, occurrence of DNA double-strain breaks, morphological and biochemical signs of programmed cell death were detected in all oral cell types exposed to clinically relevant dilutions of toombak extract, although to a lesser extent in normal oral fibroblasts and dysplastic keratinocytes. G2/M-block was also detected in normal oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts exposed to clinically relevant dilutions of toombak extract. Swedish snuff extract had less adverse effects on oral cells, mainly at non-clinically relevant dilutions. CONCLUSION: This study indicates a potential for toombak, higher than for Swedish snuff, to damage human oral epithelium. Dysplastic oral keratinocytes were less sensitive than their normal counterparts, suggesting that they might have acquired a partially resistant phenotype to toombak-induced cytotoxic effects while still being prone to DNA damage that could lead to further malignant progression.
PubMed ID
19804503 View in PubMed
Less detail

507 records – page 1 of 51.