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The 2nd international workshop 'Novel Therapeutic Strategies in Cancer' in St-Petersburg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116919
Source
Cell Death Dis. 2013;4:e475
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2013

5-alpha-reductase 2 polymorphisms as risk factors in prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19112
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Söderström T
Wadelius M
Andersson S-O
Johansson J-E
Johansson S
Granath F
Rane A
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. torbjorn.soderstrom@lmk.ck.lul.se
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Cell Differentiation
DNA - blood - metabolism
DNA Primers - chemistry
European Continental Ancestry Group
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostate-Specific Antigen - metabolism
Prostatic Neoplasms - enzymology - etiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone 5-alpha-Reductase - genetics
Abstract
Prostate cancer is a significant cause of death in Western countries and is under the strong influence of androgens. The steroid 5alpha-reductase 2 catalyzes the metabolism of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone in the prostate gland. The enzyme is a target in pharmacological treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia using specific inhibitors such as finasteride. Makridakis et al. have characterized the V89L and A49T polymorphisms in recombinant expression systems. The L allelic variant has a lower Vmax/Km ratio than the V variant. In the A49T polymorphism, the T variant has an increased Vmax/Km ratio. We performed a population-based case-control study of the impact of the SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms on the risk of prostate cancer. We also studied the relation between the genotypes and age at diagnosis, tumor, node, metastasis stage, differentiation grade, prostate specific antigen and heredity. The study included 175 prostate cancer patients and 159 healthy controls that were matched for age. There was an association with SRD5A2 V89L LL genotype and metastases at the time of diagnosis, OR 5.67 (95% CI 1.44-22.30) when adjusted for age, differentiation grade, T-stage and prostate specific antigen. Heterozygous prostate cancer cases that carried the SRD5A2 A49T AT genotype were significantly younger than cases that carried the AA genotype, (mean age 66 years vs 71, P = 0.038). The SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms were, however, not associated with altered prostate cancer risk. Further studies of the V89L polymorphism may lead to better understanding of the etiology of prostate cancer metastases.
PubMed ID
12042668 View in PubMed
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6-Bromoindole Derivatives from the Icelandic Marine Sponge Geodia barretti: Isolation and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298348
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-08-2018
Author
Xiaxia Di
Caroline Rouger
Ingibjorg Hardardottir
Jona Freysdottir
Tadeusz F Molinski
Deniz Tasdemir
Sesselja Omarsdottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland, Hagi, Hofsvallagata 53, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland. xid1@hi.is.
Source
Mar Drugs. 2018 Nov 08; 16(11):
Date
Nov-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alkaloids - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Aquatic Organisms
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Cell Differentiation - drug effects
Cells, Cultured
Coculture Techniques
Dendritic Cells
Geodia
Humans
Iceland
Indoles - chemistry
Inhibitory Concentration 50
Interleukin-10 - metabolism
Interleukin-12 Subunit p40 - metabolism
Peptides, Cyclic - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Stereoisomerism
Abstract
An UPLC-qTOF-MS-based dereplication study led to the targeted isolation of seven bromoindole alkaloids from the sub-Arctic sponge Geodia barretti. This includes three new metabolites, namely geobarrettin A?C (1?3) and four known compounds, barettin (4), 8,9-dihydrobarettin (5), 6-bromoconicamin (6), and l-6-bromohypaphorine (7). The chemical structures of compounds 1?7 were elucidated by extensive analysis of the NMR and HRESIMS data. The absolute stereochemistry of geobarrettin A (1) was assigned by ECD analysis and Marfey's method employing the new reagent l-Na-(1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)tryptophanamide (l-FDTA). The isolated compounds were screened for anti-inflammatory activity using human dendritic cells (DCs). Both 2 and 3 reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40, but 3 concomitantly increased IL-10 production. Maturing DCs treated with 2 or 3 before co-culturing with allogeneic CD4? T cells decreased T cell secretion of IFN-?, indicating a reduction in Th1 differentiation. Although barettin (4) reduced DC secretion of IL-12p40 and IL-10 (IC50 values 11.8 and 21.0 µM for IL-10 and IL-12p40, respectively), maturing DCs in the presence of 4 did not affect the ability of T cells to secrete IFN-? or IL-17, but reduced their secretion of IL-10. These results indicate that 2 and 3 may be useful for the treatment of inflammation, mainly of the Th1 type.
PubMed ID
30413031 View in PubMed
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Accelerated apoptosis and low bcl-2 expression associated with neuroendocrine differentiation predict shortened survival in operated large cell carcinoma of the lung.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20816
Source
Pathol Oncol Res. 1999;5(3):179-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
A K Eerola
H. Ruokolainen
Y. Soini
H. Raunio
P. Pääkkö
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Department of Pathology Kajaanintie 52 D, Oulu, FIN-90401, Finland.
Source
Pathol Oncol Res. 1999;5(3):179-86
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Apoptosis
Blotting, Western
Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine - metabolism - mortality - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - metabolism - mortality - pathology - surgery
Cell Differentiation
Cyclin D1 - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Lung Neoplasms - metabolism - mortality - pathology - surgery
Male
Membrane Proteins - metabolism
Middle Aged
Necrosis
Neoplasm Proteins - metabolism
Prognosis
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - metabolism
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 - metabolism
Survival Rate
bcl-2 Homologous Antagonist-Killer Protein
bcl-2-Associated X Protein
Abstract
In order to test the hypothesis that increased apoptotic activity is connected with neuroendocrine differentiation and low differentiation degree in large cell carcinoma (LCLC) and is regulated by bcl-2 family proteins, we analysed the extent of apoptosis and tumor necrosis and their relation to the expression of bcl-2, bax, bak and mcl-1 in 35 LCLCs, of which 20 were classified as large cell neuroendocrine lung carcinomas (LCNEC) and 15 as large cell non-neuroendocrine lung carcinomas (LCNNEC). The extent of apoptosis was determined by detecting and counting the relative and absolute numbers of apoptotic cells and bodies using in situ 3 -end labelling of the apoptotic DNA. The extent and intensity of expression of the bcl-2, bax, bak and mcl-1 proteins were studied by immunohistochemistry. Also the relative volume density of necrosis was evaluated and correlated with the other parameters. Finally, all the parameters were evaluated as prognostic markers and correlated with data on the survival of the patients. Relatively high apoptotic indices were seen in both tumor types (average for both 2.53%, range 0.09 27.01%). Significantly higher bcl-2 and bak indices were detected more often in LCNECs than in LCNNECs. Immunohistochemically detected bax, bcl-2 and bak expression was independent of apoptotic index in both tumor types, while there was a statistically significant positive association between mcl-1 expression and apoptotic index in LCNNEC but not in LCNEC. There was a statistically significant association between high apoptotic index and shortened survival in LCLC. However, no association was found between tumor stage and apoptosis. The patients with LCNEC and low bcl-2 protein expression had a significantly shorter survival time than those with high bcl-2 indices. There was also a clear association between shortened survival and necrotic LCNNEC. LCLCs show relatively high apoptotic activity, which is associated with shortened survival. The expression of bcl-2, bak and mcl- 1 is associated with neuroendocrine differentiation in LCLC. Finally, our results support some previous reports suggesting that bcl-2 expression in combination with some other markers involved in apoptosis and/or proliferation may be of prognostic value in cases of lung carcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation.
PubMed ID
10491014 View in PubMed
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Acetyldinaline: a new oral cytostatic drug with impressive differential activity against leukemic cells and normal stem cells--preclinical studies in a relevant rat model for human acute myelocytic leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23997
Source
Cancer Res. 1993 Jul 1;53(13):3008-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1993
Author
H M el-Beltagi
A C Martens
P. Lelieveld
E A Haroun
A. Hagenbeek
Author Affiliation
Department of Hemato-Oncology TNO, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Cancer Res. 1993 Jul 1;53(13):3008-14
Date
Jul-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacology
Bone Marrow - drug effects
Bone Marrow Cells
Cell Differentiation - drug effects
Cell Survival - drug effects
Clone Cells
Comparative Study
Disease Models, Animal
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Evaluation
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Hematopoietic Stem Cells - cytology - drug effects
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - drug therapy - pathology
Male
Phenylenediamines - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
Acetyldinaline [CI-994; GOE 5549; PD 123 654; 4-acetylamino-N-(2'-aminophenyl)-benzamide] is the acetylated derivative form of the original compound Dinaline (GOE 1734; PD 104 208). The efficacy and toxicity of Acetyldinaline for remission-induction treatment of leukemia were evaluated and compared with those observed in previous studies of Dinaline in the Brown Norway acute myelocytic leukemia, as a preclinical model for human acute myelocytic leukemia. There were three treatment groups. Leukemic animals received either 1 or 2 courses of 5 daily p.o. administrations of Acetyldinaline with a "full dose" of 23.7 mg/kg once daily (first group), a twice daily "half dose" of 11.85 mg/kg with an interval of 8 h (second group), or a "half dose" of 11.85 mg/kg once daily (third group). The drug-free interval between the 2 courses was 2 or 9 days. With repeated daily p.o. administrations of 23.7 mg/kg either in a single daily dose or a split daily dose of 2 x 11.85 mg/kg for 1 course, at least an 8-log leukemic cell kill was achieved. In contrast, with these treatment schedules, less than a 1-log cell kill of normal pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) in the femoral bone marrow was found. Split daily dose treatment was more effective resulting in 37.5% cures, while no cures were observed with the single daily treatment for one course. Treatment with single daily dose of 23.7 mg/kg or a split daily dose of 2 x 11.85 mg/kg for 2 courses, with either a 2- or 9-day interval in between, resulted in lethal toxicity in most of rats. This result was comparable with that previously observed after equimolar doses of Dinaline (20 mg/kg). The half-dose once daily treatment with Acetyldinaline (11.85 mg/kg) for 1 or 2 cycles resulted in about a 4.5 or > 8-log leukemic cell kill, respectively. Toxic side effects, i.e., damage to the gastro-intestinal tract and hemorrhages in the lungs, were more pronounced with full dose either in the single or the split daily dose regimen. No significant toxicity was observed at the half-dose treatment once daily. In conclusion, the impressive differential activity against leukemic cells and normal stem cells observed in this relevant rat model for human acute myelocytic leukemia warrants the introduction of this compound in clinical phase I/II studies.
PubMed ID
8319208 View in PubMed
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Activation of Notch signaling in human colon adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154123
Source
Int J Oncol. 2008 Dec;33(6):1223-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Michael Reedijk
Silvia Odorcic
Hui Zhang
Runjan Chetty
Carsten Tennert
Brendan C Dickson
Gina Lockwood
Steven Gallinger
Sean E Egan
Author Affiliation
Program in Developmental Biology and Stem Cell Research, The Hospital for Sick Children, MaRS East Tower, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada.
Source
Int J Oncol. 2008 Dec;33(6):1223-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - genetics - mortality - pathology
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors - genetics
Calcium-Binding Proteins - genetics
Cell Differentiation
Colonic Neoplasms - genetics - mortality - pathology
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Germany
Glycosyltransferases - genetics
Homeodomain Proteins - genetics
Humans
In Situ Hybridization
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Ontario
Prognosis
RNA, Messenger - analysis
Receptor, Notch1 - genetics
Receptors, Notch - genetics
Registries
Signal Transduction - genetics
Abstract
Notch and Wnt signaling function together to regulate colonic progenitor cell division and differentiation. Studies in mice have also shown that Notch signaling is required for adenoma formation in response to elevated Wnt-pathway signaling that occurs in the APCMin mouse model of human adenomatous polyposis coli. We therefore used in situ hybridization to analyze expression of Notch ligands, receptors and fringe genes, as well as the Notch target gene, HES1, in human colorectal cancer (CRC). In a small cohort of tumors, JAGGED ligands, NOTCH1, LFNG and HES1 were expressed at levels similar to, or higher than, levels observed in the crypt. To explore the possibility that Notch signaling may play a quantitative role in human CRC we next analyzed HES1 mRNA expression in 130 tumors, each associated with outcome data. The vast majority of these tumors expressed HES1, although at varying levels. Absolute expression levels did not correlate with patient survival. These results establish that JAG ligands and NOTCH1, as well as Notch receptor activation are consistent features of human CRC and support the notion that many of these tumors, like the APCMin mouse, may respond to anti-Notch therapeutic regimes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19020755 View in PubMed
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Adrenergic regulation of erythropoiesis during cytostatic-induced myelosuppressions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88844
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2008 Oct;146(4):405-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Skurikhin E G
Pershina O V
Minakova M Yu
Ermakova N N
Firsova T V
Dygai A M
Gol'dberg E D
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pharmacology, Tomsk Research Center, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Tomsk, Russia.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2008 Oct;146(4):405-10
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bone Marrow - drug effects - metabolism
Cell Differentiation - drug effects
Cell Proliferation - drug effects
Central Nervous System - drug effects - physiology
Cyclophosphamide - pharmacology
Cytostatic Agents - pharmacology
Erythroid Precursor Cells - cytology - drug effects
Erythropoiesis - drug effects
Erythropoietin - metabolism
Female
Fluorouracil - pharmacology
Hematopoiesis - drug effects - physiology
Mice
Mice, Inbred CBA
Norepinephrine - pharmacology
S Phase
Abstract
The role of central adrenergic structures in the regulation of the erythroid hematopoietic stem was studied during administration of cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil. The central nervous system contributed to suppression of erythropoiesis during cytostatic treatment. The suppressive effect of brain adrenergic structures on the erythron after treatment with cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil was related to dysfunction of adherent cells in the hemopoiesis-inducing microenvironment (formation of hemopoietic islets and secretion of erythropoietic activity) and production of growth factors by myelokaryocytes, respectively. Brain norepinephrine had an inhibitory effect on proliferative activity and differentiation of erythroid precursors that were associated with the erythropoietin and peripheral alpha-adrenergic structures. However, stimulation of beta-adrenergic structures was followed by an increase in the rate of erythroid cell maturation.
PubMed ID
19489307 View in PubMed
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Apoptosis and apoptosis-related factors Bcl-2, Bax, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and NF-kappaB in human endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18875
Source
Cancer. 2002 Oct 1;95(7):1463-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2002
Author
Tommi E Vaskivuo
Frej Stenbäck
Juha S Tapanainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cancer. 2002 Oct 1;95(7):1463-71
Date
Oct-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Apoptosis
Cell Differentiation
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
Endometrial Neoplasms - genetics - immunology - pathology
Endometrium - pathology
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Homeostasis
Humans
Hyperplasia
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Hybridization
Middle Aged
NF-kappa B - biosynthesis
Neoplasm Staging
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - biosynthesis
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 - biosynthesis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - biosynthesis
bcl-2-Associated X Protein
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Apoptosis controls cell homeostasis in the endometrium during normal menstrual cycles, and morphologic studies have suggested its association with the development of endometrial carcinoma. Apoptosis is regulated by several genes, especially those of the Bcl-2 gene family, but their significance in endometrial pathologies is not well understood. METHODS: To study the role and regulation of apoptosis in endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma, human endometrial specimens were analyzed using in situ 3'-end labeling of apoptotic cells and in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry of apoptosis-related factors. RESULTS: Apoptosis was scarce in normal proliferating endometrium as well as in simplex, complex, and atypical hyperplasia and was low in Grade I adenocarcinoma. In Grade II adenocarcinoma a significant increase in the rate of apoptosis was observed. Apoptosis decreased in Grade III adenocarcinoma, but it was still higher than in normal or hyperplastic endometrium. Bcl-2 and Bax were expressed in normal and hyperplastic endometrium, and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was lower in endometrial carcinoma. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was expressed in normal endometrium and simplex and complex hyperplasia, but it was down-regulated in atypical hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma. The transcription factor NF-kappaB was present in proliferating endometrium and in endometrial hyperplasia, but its expression was lower in carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: In endometrial proliferation and hyperplasia a low rate of apoptosis is present. In Grade I carcinoma the rate of apoptosis is decreased, but the rate is subsequently increased in advanced carcinoma. The decrease in the rate of apoptosis in Grade III adenocarcinoma may reflect loss of control of cell homeostasis, decreased differentiation, and increased malignancy.
PubMed ID
12237915 View in PubMed
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Assessment of an efficient xeno-free culture system of human periodontal ligament stem cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266376
Source
Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 2015 Jan;21(1):52-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Oriana Trubiani
Adriano Piattelli
Valentina Gatta
Marco Marchisio
Francesca Diomede
Marco D'Aurora
Ilaria Merciaro
Laura Pierdomenico
Nadir Mario Maraldi
Nicoletta Zini
Source
Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 2015 Jan;21(1):52-64
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cell Culture Techniques - methods
Cell Differentiation
Cell Proliferation
Cell Shape
Cells, Cultured
Flow Cytometry
Gene Expression Regulation
Humans
Immunophenotyping
Karyotyping
Multipotent Stem Cells - cytology
Osteogenesis - genetics
Periodontal Ligament - cytology
Stem Cells - cytology - ultrastructure
Young Adult
Abstract
The possibility of transplanting adult stem cells into damaged organs has opened new prospects for the treatment of several human pathologies. The purpose of this study was to develop a culture system for the expansion and production of human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs) using a new xeno-free media formulation and ensuring the maintenance of the stem cells features comprising the multiple passage expansion, mesengenic lineage differentiation, cellular phenotype, and genomic stability, essential elements for conforming to translation to cell therapy. Somatic stem cells were isolated from the human periodontium using a minimally invasive periodontal access flap surgery in healthy donors. Expanded hPDLSCs in a xeno-free culture showed the morphological features of stem cells, expressed the markers associated with pluripotency, and a normal karyotype. Under appropriate culture conditions, hPDLSCs presented adipogenic and osteogenic potential; indeed, a very high accumulation of lipid droplets was evident in the cytoplasm of adipogenic-induced cells, and indisputable evidence of osteogenic differentiation, investigated by transmission electron microscopy, and analyzed for gene expression analysis has been shown. Based on these data, the novel xeno-free culture method might provide the basis for Good Manufacturing Procedure culture of autologous stem cells, readily accessible from human periodontium, and can be a resource to facilitate their use in human clinical studies for potential therapeutic regeneration.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24787358 View in PubMed
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Autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma by subtype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13694
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Jan 4;98(1):51-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-2006
Author
Karin Ekström Smedby
Henrik Hjalgrim
Johan Askling
Ellen T Chang
Henrik Gregersen
Anna Porwit-MacDonald
Christer Sundström
Måns Akerman
Mads Melbye
Bengt Glimelius
Hans-Olov Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. karin.ekstrom@meb.ki.se
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Jan 4;98(1):51-60
Date
Jan-4-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications
Autoantigens - immunology
Autoimmunity
Case-Control Studies
Celiac Disease - complications
Cell Differentiation - immunology
Chronic Disease
Denmark
Female
Humans
Inflammation - complications
Logistic Models
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications
Lymphocytes - immunology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - etiology - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sjogren's Syndrome - complications
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders are associated with increased risks of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Because different NHL subtypes develop at different stages of lymphocyte differentiation, associations of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders with specific NHL subtypes could lead to a better understanding of lymphomagenic mechanisms. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study in Denmark and Sweden, 3055 NHL patients and 3187 matched control subjects were asked about their history of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders, markers of severity, and treatment. Logistic regression with adjustment for study matching factors was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for NHL overall and for NHL subtypes. RESULTS: Risks of all NHL were increased in association with rheumatoid arthritis (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1 to 1.9), primary Sj?gren syndrome (OR = 6.1, 95% CI = 1.4 to 27), systemic lupus erythematosus (OR = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.0 to 22), and celiac disease (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.0 to 4.8). All of these conditions were also associated with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and some were associated with marginal zone, lymphoplasmacytic, or T-cell lymphoma. Ever use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, systemic corticosteroids, and selected immunosuppressants was associated with risk of NHL in rheumatoid arthritis patients but not in subjects without rheumatoid arthritis. Also, multivariable adjustment for treatment had little impact on risk estimates. Psoriasis, sarcoidosis, and inflammatory bowel disorders were not associated with increased risk of NHL overall or of any NHL subtype. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm the associations between certain autoimmune disorders and risk of NHL and suggest that the associations may not be general but rather mediated through specific NHL subtypes. These NHL subtypes develop during postantigen exposure stages of lymphocyte differentiation, consistent with a role of antigenic drive in autoimmunity-related lymphomagenesis.
PubMed ID
16391371 View in PubMed
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