Skip header and navigation

Refine By

44 records – page 1 of 5.

Adoptive transfer of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells induces airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in brown-Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57604
Source
Immunology. 1997 Jun;91(2):176-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Haczku
P. Macary
T J Huang
H. Tsukagoshi
P J Barnes
A B Kay
D M Kemeny
K F Chung
R. Moqbel
Author Affiliation
Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Guy's Hospital, London, UK.
Source
Immunology. 1997 Jun;91(2):176-85
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - immunology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology - transplantation
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology - transplantation
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Division - immunology
Eosinophils - immunology
Leukocyte Count
Lymphocyte Transfusion
Male
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spleen - immunology
Abstract
Following allergen exposure, sensitized Brown-Norway rats develop airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and eosinophilic inflammation together with an increase in activated T cells (CD25+) in the airways. We tested the hypothesis that CD4+ T cells are involved directly in the acquisition of AHR. Spleen T cells from animals that were injected intraperitoneally on three consecutive days with ovalbumin/Al(OH)3, showed a dose-dependent proliferative response in vitro to ovalbumin, but not to bovine serum albumin, as measured by [3H]thymidine uptake. For total T-cell transfer, spleen cells obtained from donor rats 4 days after sensitization were depleted of adherent cells by a nylon wool column separation. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were purified by immunomagnetic beads cell separation. Recipient naive rats were injected intravenously with 50 x 10(6) total T cells, 20 x 10(6) and 5 x 10(6) CD4+ cells, and 5 x 10(6) CD8+ cells, and were exposed to ovalbumin aerosol 24 hr afterwards. After a further 24 hr, airway responsiveness to acetylcholine (ACh) was measured and provocative concentration (PC) values PC100, PC200 and PC300) (the ACh concentration needed to achieve 100, 200 and 300% increase in lung resistance above baseline) were calculated. Airway responsiveness was significantly increased in recipients of sensitized total T cells compared with recipients of cells from saline-injected donor rats (P
PubMed ID
9227314 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antitumorigenic and cytotoxic properties of an ethanol extract derived from Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192645
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Oct 26;64(4):357-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2001
Author
D D Kitts
K T Lim
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition, and Health, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. ddkitts@unixg.ubc.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Oct 26;64(4):357-71
Date
Oct-26-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Death
Cell Division - drug effects
Chemoprevention
Copper - chemistry
DNA Damage - drug effects
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Ethanol - chemistry
Free Radicals
Glycoproteins - isolation & purification - pharmacology
HeLa Cells - drug effects
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Iron - pharmacology
Mice
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Neurons - drug effects
Oxidation-Reduction
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plasmids
Rhus
Abstract
In this study, the antioxidant, cytotoxic, and antitumorigenic activities of a fractionated, ethanol extract derived from Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS), a plant indigenous to Korea, China, and Japan, were determined. Physicochemical analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results indicated that the active component of a Sephadex G-150-fractionated RVS extract (PII fraction) was a copper-containing glycoprotein, possibly a plant laccase. Antioxidant activity of the fractionated RVS extract, observed in both aqueous and lipid in vitro oxidation reactions using 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, site-specific Fenton-reaction deoxyribose, and a model lipid emulsion test system, indicated an affinity for protection against hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals. Cultured mouse brain neurons were protected against glucose oxidase-induced hydroxyl radical in the presence of the fractionated RVS extract (e.g., 58% protection at 4.9 microM and 95% protection with 22.7 microM RVS). RVS was further shown to protect against in vitro Fenton-reaction-induced single- and double-strand scission in supercoiled plasmid DNA. Further testing for bioactivity of the fractionated RVS extract was based on the affinity to inhibit cell proliferation in cultured HeLa and CT-26 tumor cells. The presence of RVS resulted in 70% cell death after 24 h of incubation in both cell lines at a minimum concentration of 2.48 microM RVS. Data demonstrate multiple bioactive chemopreventative properties of a Sephadex G-150-fractionated extract derived from RVS.
PubMed ID
11693493 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of an efficient xeno-free culture system of human periodontal ligament stem cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266376
Source
Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 2015 Jan;21(1):52-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Oriana Trubiani
Adriano Piattelli
Valentina Gatta
Marco Marchisio
Francesca Diomede
Marco D'Aurora
Ilaria Merciaro
Laura Pierdomenico
Nadir Mario Maraldi
Nicoletta Zini
Source
Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 2015 Jan;21(1):52-64
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cell Culture Techniques - methods
Cell Differentiation
Cell Proliferation
Cell Shape
Cells, Cultured
Flow Cytometry
Gene Expression Regulation
Humans
Immunophenotyping
Karyotyping
Multipotent Stem Cells - cytology
Osteogenesis - genetics
Periodontal Ligament - cytology
Stem Cells - cytology - ultrastructure
Young Adult
Abstract
The possibility of transplanting adult stem cells into damaged organs has opened new prospects for the treatment of several human pathologies. The purpose of this study was to develop a culture system for the expansion and production of human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs) using a new xeno-free media formulation and ensuring the maintenance of the stem cells features comprising the multiple passage expansion, mesengenic lineage differentiation, cellular phenotype, and genomic stability, essential elements for conforming to translation to cell therapy. Somatic stem cells were isolated from the human periodontium using a minimally invasive periodontal access flap surgery in healthy donors. Expanded hPDLSCs in a xeno-free culture showed the morphological features of stem cells, expressed the markers associated with pluripotency, and a normal karyotype. Under appropriate culture conditions, hPDLSCs presented adipogenic and osteogenic potential; indeed, a very high accumulation of lipid droplets was evident in the cytoplasm of adipogenic-induced cells, and indisputable evidence of osteogenic differentiation, investigated by transmission electron microscopy, and analyzed for gene expression analysis has been shown. Based on these data, the novel xeno-free culture method might provide the basis for Good Manufacturing Procedure culture of autologous stem cells, readily accessible from human periodontium, and can be a resource to facilitate their use in human clinical studies for potential therapeutic regeneration.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jul 10-16;364(9429):149-5515246727
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 Dec 5;97(25):13625-3011087820
Cites: Science. 1999 Apr 2;284(5411):143-710102814
Cites: J Electron Microsc (Tokyo). 2005 Jan;54(1):29-3415695482
Cites: J Clin Periodontol. 2005 Mar;32(3):266-7215766369
Cites: Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol. 2005 Apr-Jun;18(2):213-2115888245
Cites: Matrix Biol. 2005 Apr;24(2):155-6515890265
Cites: Stem Cells. 2005 Oct;23(9):1357-6616081661
Cites: Stem Cells. 2006 May;24(5):1407-816456132
Cites: Oral Dis. 2006 Jul;12(4):358-6316792719
Cites: PLoS One. 2006;1:e7917183711
Cites: Stem Cells. 2007 May;25(5):1270-817255520
Cites: Stem Cells. 2007 Jul;25(7):1603-917395775
Cites: Transfusion. 2007 Aug;47(8):1436-4617655588
Cites: Cytotherapy. 2007;9(5):427-3817786604
Cites: Exp Hematol. 2000 Jun;28(6):707-1510880757
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(8):e7110123940696
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 May 13;100(10):5807-1212716973
Cites: Cell Biol Int. 2004;28(4):281-615109984
Cites: Anal Biochem. 2004 Jun 1;329(1):77-8415136169
Cites: J Cell Physiol. 2008 Mar;214(3):706-1317894415
Cites: Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2008 Apr;15(2):135-4118316948
Cites: J Clin Periodontol. 2008 May;35(5):385-9718341599
Cites: Stem Cells. 2008 Apr;26(4):1065-7318238856
Cites: Bone. 2008 Oct;43(4):679-8818672106
Cites: Int J Dev Biol. 2008;52(8):1023-3218956335
Cites: J Biomed Mater Res A. 2008 Dec 15;87(4):986-9318257082
Cites: Cells Tissues Organs. 2009;189(1-4):133-718728344
Cites: Neurobiol Aging. 2009 Mar;30(3):394-40617850925
Cites: Stem Cells. 2009 Sep;27(9):2331-4119544413
Cites: J Dent Res. 2009 Sep;88(9):792-80619767575
Cites: Stem Cells. 2009 Oct;27(10):2457-6819609939
Cites: Tissue Eng Part A. 2009 Dec;15(12):3741-5119519274
Cites: Oral Dis. 2010 Jan;16(1):20-820355278
Cites: Stem Cell Res Ther. 2010;1(1):820504289
Cites: J Cell Physiol. 2010 Oct;225(1):123-3120458727
Cites: Cell Tissue Res. 2010 Sep;341(3):397-40420632035
Cites: J Cell Physiol. 2011 Jan;226(1):66-7320625993
Cites: Stem Cells. 2010 Oct;28(10):1829-3820979138
Cites: Cell Tissue Res. 2010 Nov;342(2):233-4220931341
Cites: Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 2011 Apr;17(4):485-9321166520
Cites: Cells Tissues Organs. 2011;193(6):366-7821124001
Cites: Int J Biol Sci. 2012;8(2):272-8822298955
Cites: J Biochem. 2012 Mar;151(3):247-5422253449
Cites: Tissue Eng Part A. 2012 Dec;18(23-24):2601-1022881458
Cites: J Prosthodont Res. 2012 Oct;56(4):229-4823137671
Cites: J Bone Miner Metab. 2013 Jan;31(1):53-6323014973
Cites: Bone. 2013 Jun;54(2):237-4323072922
Cites: Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol. 2013;29:63-7923725048
Cites: BMC Genomics. 2013;14:63524053474
Cites: Stem Cells Dev. 2013 Dec 15;22(24):3157-7723944935
Cites: Oral Dis. 2014 Jan;20(1):25-3423463961
Cites: J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater. 2014 Jan;102(1):119-3023853066
Cites: J Periodontal Res. 2014 Jun;49(3):333-4523841948
Cites: Cell Death Dis. 2013;4:e62023640462
Cites: J Cell Physiol. 2013 Nov;228(11):2149-5823559326
Cites: Lancet. 1973 Aug 4;2(7823):2694124465
PubMed ID
24787358 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cell culture–derived influenza vaccines: has their time come?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140533
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2010 Nov 1;51(9):1005-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2010

[Change in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+ caused by extracellular ATP and ecto-ATP-ase activity in thymocytes and transformed MT-4 cells]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98805
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Mar-Apr;81(2):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Hrebinyk
O Iu Artemenko
I I Hryniuk
O M Perepelitsyna
O P Matyshevs'ka
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Mar-Apr;81(2):27-33
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Triphosphatases - metabolism
Animals
Calcium - metabolism
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Line, Transformed
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic - metabolism
Culture Media
Cytosol - enzymology - metabolism
Extracellular Space - enzymology - metabolism
Female
Kinetics
Male
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Thymus Gland - cytology - enzymology - metabolism
Abstract
The comparative study of extracellular ATP (ATP0) effect on free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in normal (isolated rat thymocytes) and transformed (leukosis MT-4 line) T-cells was carried out. Addition of 1 mM ATP to Ca-free incubation medium of both types of cells, loaded with indo-1, had no effect on [Ca2+]i level. Upon subsequent addition of 1 mM CaCl2 to the incubation medium the rapid and significant increase of [Ca2+]i in MT-4 cells was registered. This effect was maintained within 10 min and was not inhibited by phospholipase C inhibitor 0.2 mM neomycin, that was induced by cation entry into the cells from the extracellular medium. Both types of cells were shown to demonstrate ecto-ATPase activity in the presence of 1 mM MgCl2 or CaC12 in the incubation medium. Estimation of kinetic parameters has indicated that the maximum rate of extracellular ATP hydrolysis by MT-4 cells is higher and Mg2+ and Ca2+ activation constants are lower as compared to respective parameters of ATP hydrolysis by thymocytes. The possible functional significance of the increased level of ecto-ATPase activity in malignantly transformed cells is discussed.
PubMed ID
19873874 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of the interactions between stromal and haematopoietic progenitor cells in expansion cell culture models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63251
Source
Cell Biol Int. 2005 Jan;29(1):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
N M Bilko
I A Votyakova
S V Vasylovska
D I Bilko
Author Affiliation
Medical Centre of Tissue and Cell Therapy Embryotech, National University Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kiev, Ukraine. nadja@bilko.kiev.ua
Source
Cell Biol Int. 2005 Jan;29(1):83-6
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cell Communication
Cell Culture Techniques - methods
Coculture Techniques - methods
Culture Media, Conditioned
Embryo - cytology
Female
Fetal Blood - cytology
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor - pharmacology
Hematopoiesis - physiology
Hematopoietic Stem Cells - drug effects - physiology
Humans
Interleukin-3 - pharmacology
Interleukin-6 - pharmacology
Multipotent Stem Cells - cytology
Pregnancy
Stromal Cells - physiology
Abstract
Development of the long-term culture models of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is one of the important tasks in modern biotechnology. It has been suggested that stromal presence is important for haematopoiesis in vitro and in vivo, but the question remains: whether diffusible factors produced by stromal cells are sufficient for the regeneration of primitive and definitive haematopoietic cells, or direct cell-to-cell contacts of the cultured material with underlying stromal base would be required. During present studies, influence of various feeder layers and feeder layer conditioned media on proliferative, differentiative and clonogenic activity of human AC133+ derived from human umbilical cord blood was investigated. Cell extracts for feeder layers were prepared from 4-6 weeks old human embryos and co-cultured feeder cells. Effects of the conditioned media were also determined. Culture and feeder layer media were additionally supplemented with commonly implemented factors such as GM-CSF, IL-3 and LIF. Estimation of morpho-functional properties of AC133+ cultivated suspension cultures was performed in subculture experiments using semisolid agar culture conditions. Multipotential CFU-MIX (CFU-GEMM) and unipotential progenitor cells CFU-GM, BFU-E and CFU-E were observed and analyzed. Our data suggest that haematopoiesis can be sustained for prolonged cultivation periods in the presence of feeder layer cells or conditioned media supported culture models. Prolonged support of primitive haematopoietic cells and their clonogenic capacity and functional characteristics in feeder layer positive cultures, indicates that diffusible factors are sufficient for haematopoiesis and suggests that direct cell-to-cell contacts may not be exclusively required for successful long-term in vitro haematopoiesis.
PubMed ID
15763504 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical evaluation of MPT-64 and MPT-59, two proteins secreted from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, for skin test reagents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69537
Source
Tuber Lung Dis. 1996 Jun;77(3):250-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
J T Wilcke
B N Jensen
P. Ravn
A B Andersen
K. Hasløv
Author Affiliation
Department P of Pulmonary Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Tuber Lung Dis. 1996 Jun;77(3):250-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antigens, Bacterial - diagnostic use
BCG Vaccine
Bacterial Proteins - diagnostic use
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Division - immunology
Comparative Study
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Delayed - immunology
Interferon Type II - biosynthesis
Intradermal Tests - methods
Lymphocytes - immunology
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - immunology
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis - diagnosis
Abstract
SETTING: Department of Pulmonary Medicine P, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. OBJECTIVE: To study the ability of two proteins secreted from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, MPT-64 and MPT-59 to induce delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions following intradermal administration. DESIGN: In a small scale clinical investigation, skin reactions to these antigens were compared to reactions to tuberculin PPD RT23 in 1) patients with active tuberculosis, 2) BCG vaccinated healthy subjects with close contact with tuberculous patients, and 3) BCG vaccinated healthy subjects without contact with tuberculous patients. Tests for in vitro reactivity to these antigens were carried out in similar groups. RESULTS: All subjects gave positive reaction to tuberculin PPD RT23, whereas approximately half of the subjects in each of the three groups reacted to MPT-59. Two subjects (one patient with tuberculosis and one healthy bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccinated subject without patient contact) reacted to MPT-64. The studies of cell proliferation and induction of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) following stimulation with tuberculin PPD and MPT-64 supported this profile of reactivity. CONCLUSION: None of the experimental skin test antigens had properties superior to tuberculin PPD RT23 in humans. The failure of MPT-64 to induce delayed type hypersensitivity reactions in the majority of tuberculosis patients is discussed, in view of the potent reactivity to MPT-64 in tuberculous guinea pigs.
PubMed ID
8758109 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolate with a N. meningitidis porA gene and no prolyliminopeptidase activity, Sweden, 2011: danger of false-negative genetic and culture diagnostic results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126310
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(9)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
D. Golparian
E. Johansson
M. Unemo
Author Affiliation
WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Swedish Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2012;17(9)
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aminopeptidases - genetics - metabolism
Cell Culture Techniques
Enzyme Activation
False Negative Reactions
Female
Gonorrhea - diagnosis - genetics - microbiology
Humans
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Neisseria meningitidis - genetics - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Porins - genetics
Pseudogenes - genetics
Sweden
Abstract
We describe a Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain, found in Sweden in 2011, that harbours a N. meningitidis porA gene causing false-negative results in PCRs targeting the gonococcal porA pseudogene. Furthermore, the strain had no prolyliminopeptidase (PIP) activity that many commercial biochemical kits for species verification in culture rely on. Enhanced awareness of the spread of such strains and screening for them can be crucial.
PubMed ID
22401563 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinicopathological characteristics and non-adhesive organ culture of insulinomas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85897
Source
Scand J Surg. 2008;97(1):42-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Hoem D.
Jensen D.
Steine S.
Thorsen T E
Viste A.
Molven A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Dag.Hoem@haukeland.no
Source
Scand J Surg. 2008;97(1):42-9
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cell Culture Techniques
Female
Humans
Insulinoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pancreatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Insulinoma is a very rare type of islet cell tumour, but nevertheless the most common endocrine tumour of the pancreas. We aimed at reviewing our clinical experience with this tumour type and to assess whether organ culture could be obtained from surgically resected insulinoma material. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients with insulinomas (6 men and 10 women) referred to Haukeland University Hospital between 1986 and 2006 were included in the study. Median age of onset was 53 years (range 21-74). Biochemical diagnosis was established during a 72 h fast test. Imaging and localization of the tumours were performed with intra-operative ultrasonography, endoscopic ultrasonography, CT-scan and/or transcutaneous ultrasonography. For six patients, organ cultures were set up from tumour tissue fragments. RESULTS: The annual incidence of insulinoma was 0.8 per million. The patients generally presented with non-specific, episodic symptoms, which often were mistaken for cardiovascular, neurological or diabetic disease and in some cases delayed the diagnosis with several years. Two patients had diabetes prior to the diagnosis of insulinoma. Patient weight gain was probably due to increased food intake, compensating for the hypoglycemia. Intra-operative ultrasonography detected all tumours correctly, whereas 73% were detected by endoscopic ultrasonography and 38% by CT scan. Five insulinomas were located in the head, eight in the body and three in the tail of the pancreas. All were removed by open-access surgery, eleven cases by resection and five by enucleation. One tumour was malignant with liver metastases and two patients had tumours defined as borderline. Insulinoma tissue fragments developed into spheroids during the first week of culturing and insulin secretion into the media was demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: Insulinomas are rare and diagnostically challenging tumours. Intra-operative ultrasonography was superior to other imaging modalities to locate the lesion. In organ culture, insulinomas readily form spheroids which may be used to yield insight into beta-cell biology.
PubMed ID
18450205 View in PubMed
Less detail

Culture confirmation of gonococcal infection by recall of subjects found to be positive by nucleic acid amplification tests in general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140117
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Nov;86(6):478-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Jens Kjølseth Møller
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Lillebaelt Hospital, Kabbeltoft 25, DK-7100 Vejle, Denmark. jkm@dadlnet.dk
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Nov;86(6):478-9
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Bacteriological Techniques - methods
Cell Culture Techniques
Denmark
Family Practice
Female
Gonorrhea - diagnosis
Humans
Male
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques - standards
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Retrospective Studies
Specimen Handling
Abstract
To evaluate a routine notification of general practitioners to recall nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-positive subjects for culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to confirm gonococcal infection in the community.
A retrospective observational study of the routine testing for N gonorrhoeae by analysis of test results compiled from the laboratory information system in two departments of clinical microbiology.
Altogether, 158 male and female subjects with NAAT-positive results for N gonorrhoeae were included in the study. Samples for culture of N gonorrhoeae were collected from 102/158 (64.6%) subjects recalled after a NAAT assay was found positive. Growth of N gonorrhoeae was seen in the samples from 54/102 (52.9%) of the re-examined NAAT-positive subjects. Among subjects with samples collected within the first week after the positive NAAT test, 34/44 (77.3%) were confirmed positive by culture.
This study shows that it is possible for the general practitioner to recall a substantial number of NAAT-positive subjects to collect swabs for culture of N gonorrhoeae to confirm gonococcal infection in the community. Most recall samples are culture positive if collected within a week of the NAAT-positive test, and may provide a sufficient monitoring of the drug susceptibility of N gonorrhoeae strains in the community.
PubMed ID
20940162 View in PubMed
Less detail

44 records – page 1 of 5.