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625 records – page 1 of 63.

A 13-year report on childhood sinusitis: clinical presentations, predisposing factors and possible means of prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15834
Source
Rhinology. 1996 Sep;34(3):171-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
G. Henriksson
K M Westrin
J. Kumlien
P. Stierna
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Rhinology. 1996 Sep;34(3):171-5
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child
Child, Preschool
Ethmoid Sinusitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Nasal Polyps - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sinusitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Two hundred and nineteen children with sinusitis treated as in-patients at Huddinge University Hospital during the period 1980-1992 have been reviewed. Epidemiological data, the clinical picture, treatment and complications are described. The prevalence of significant predisposing conditions (such as upper airway allergy, asthma, and immunoglobulin deficiency) has been estimated. Serious sinusitis complications are few, surgery is only rarely required, and previously-recognized important predisposing paediatric conditions are not significantly more common than in the general juvenile population. Improved medication and prevention may have reduced the incidence of serious sinus infections in risk groups today. Children with cystic fibrosis have been reviewed with regard to the necessity of both sinus and nasal polyp surgery. Aggressive medical therapy appears to have reduced their need for sinus surgery as well as polypectomy.
PubMed ID
8938888 View in PubMed
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Above all, do no harm: assessing the risk of an adverse reaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194729
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
K. Turcotte
P. Raina
V A Moyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology University of British Columbia, 4480 Oak St, L-408 Vancouver, BC, Canada V6H 1V4.
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Physician-Patient Relations
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Vaccination - adverse effects
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1983 Jan;102(1):14-86848712
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Mar 23-30;263(12):1641-52308203
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jul 15;136(2):121-351415136
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Jan 31;351(9099):356-619652634
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Feb 8;334(6):341-88538704
Cites: Dev Biol Stand. 1997;89:109-129272340
Cites: Vaccine. 1998 Jan-Feb;16(2-3):225-319607034
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Jan 5;271(1):37-417903109
PubMed ID
11342510 View in PubMed
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Academic performance in adolescence after inguinal hernia repair in infancy: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136563
Source
Anesthesiology. 2011 May;114(5):1076-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Tom G Hansen
Jacob K Pedersen
Steen W Henneberg
Dorthe A Pedersen
Jeffrey C Murray
Neil S Morton
Kaare Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. tomghansen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Anesthesiology. 2011 May;114(5):1076-85
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Anesthesia - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Causality
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Odds Ratio
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although animal studies have indicated that general anesthetics may result in widespread apoptotic neurodegeneration and neurocognitive impairment in the developing brain, results from human studies are scarce. We investigated the association between exposure to surgery and anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair in infancy and subsequent academic performance.
Using Danish birth cohorts from 1986-1990, we compared the academic performance of all children who had undergone inguinal hernia repair in infancy to a randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample. Primary analysis compared average test scores at ninth grade adjusting for sex, birth weight, and paternal and maternal age and education. Secondary analysis compared the proportions of children not attaining test scores between the two groups.
From 1986-1990 in Denmark, 2,689 children underwent inguinal hernia repair in infancy. A randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample consists of 14,575 individuals. Although the exposure group performed worse than the control group (average score 0.26 lower; 95% CI, 0.21-0.31), after adjusting for known confounders, no statistically significant difference (-0.04; 95% CI, -0.09 to 0.01) between the exposure and control groups could be demonstrated. However, the odds ratio for test score nonattainment associated with inguinal hernia repair was 1.18 (95% CI, 1.04-1.35). Excluding from analyses children with other congenital malformations, the difference in mean test scores remained nearly unchanged (0.05; 95% CI, 0.00-0.11). In addition, the increased proportion of test score nonattainment within the exposure group was attenuated (odds ratio = 1.13; 95% CI, 0.98-1.31).
In the ethnically and socioeconomically homogeneous Danish population, we found no evidence that a single, relatively brief anesthetic exposure in connection with hernia repair in infancy reduced academic performance at age 15 or 16 yr after adjusting for known confounding factors. However, the higher test score nonattainment rate among the hernia group could suggest that a subgroup of these children are developmentally disadvantaged compared with the background population.
Notes
Comment In: Anesthesiology. 2011 Dec;115(6):1387; author reply 1387-822108309
PubMed ID
21368654 View in PubMed
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Accepting parental responsibility: "future questioning" as a means to avoid foster home placement of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224567
Source
Child Welfare. 1992 Jan-Feb;71(1):3-17
Publication Type
Article

Accident rates and types among self-employed private forest owners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100478
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Ola Lindroos
Lage Burström
Author Affiliation
Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden. ola.lindroos@srh.slu.se
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2010 Nov;42(6):1729-35
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Adult
Causality
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forestry - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ownership - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Risk factors
Sick Leave
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
Half of all Swedish forests are owned by private individuals, and at least 215,000 people work in these privately owned forest holdings. However, only lethal accidents are systematically monitored among self-employed forest workers. Therefore, data from the registries of the Swedish Work Environment Authority, the Labor Insurance Organization and the regional University Hospital in Umeå were gathered to allow us to perform a more in-depth assessment of the rate and types of accidents that occurred among private forest owners. We found large differences between the registries in the type and number of accidents that were reported. We encountered difficulties in defining "self-employed forest worker" and also in determining whether the accidents that did occur happened during work or leisure time. Consequently, the estimates for the accident rate that we obtained varied from 32 to > or = 4300 injured persons per year in Sweden, depending on the registry that was consulted, the definition of the sample population that was used, and the accident severity definition that was employed. Nevertheless, the different registries gave a consistent picture of the types of accidents that occur while individuals are participating in self-employed forestry work. Severe accidents were relatively common, as self-employed forestry work fatalities constituted 7% of the total number of fatalities in the work authority registry. Falling trees were associated with many of these fatal accidents as well as with accidents that resulted in severe non-fatal injuries. Thus, unsafe work methods appeared more related to the occurrence of an accident than the equipment that was being used at the time of the accident (e.g., a chainsaw). Improvement of the workers' skills should therefore be considered to be an important prevention measure that should be undertaken in this field. The challenges in improving the safety in these smallest of companies, which fall somewhere between the purview of occupational and consumer safety, are exemplified and discussed.
PubMed ID
20728623 View in PubMed
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Accidents and close call situations connected to the use of mobile phones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127715
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2012 Mar;45:75-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Leena Korpinen
Rauno Pääkkönen
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland. leena.korpinen@tut.fi
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2012 Mar;45:75-82
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Causality
Cellular Phone
Educational Status
Finland
Human Engineering
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of our work was to study the accidents and close call situations connected to the use of mobile phones. We have analyzed how the accidents/close call situations are connected to background information, in particular age, gender and self-reported symptoms. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study by posting the questionnaire to 15,000 working-age Finns. The responses (6121) were analyzed using the logistic regression models. Altogether 13.7% of respondents had close call situations and 2.4% had accidents at leisure, in which the mobile phone had a partial effect, and at work the amounts were 4.5% and 0.4% respectively, during the last 12 months. Essentially, we found that: (1) men tend to have more close calls and accidents while on a mobile phone, (2) younger people tend to have more accidents and close calls while on a mobile phone, but it does not appear to be large enough to warrant intervention, (3) employed people tend to have more problems with mobile phone usage and accidents/close calls, and (4) there was a slight increase in mobile-phone-related accidents/close calls if the respondent also reported sleep disturbances and minor aches and pains. In the future, it is important to take into account and study how symptoms can increase the risk of accidents or close call situations in which a mobile phone has a partial effect.
PubMed ID
22269487 View in PubMed
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Accidents are normal and human error does not exist: a new look at the creation of occupational safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184819
Source
Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 2003;9(2):211-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Sidney W A Dekker
Author Affiliation
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Linköping Institute of Technology, Linköping, Sweden. sidde@ikp.liu.se
Source
Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 2003;9(2):211-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Attitude
Causality
Human Engineering - methods
Humans
Occupational Health
Safety
Sweden
Systems Analysis
Abstract
"Human error" is often cited as cause of occupational mishaps and industrial accidents. Human error, however, can also be seen as an effect (rather than the cause) of trouble deeper inside systems. The latter perspective is called the "new view" in ergonomics today. This paper details some of the antecedents and implications of the old and the new view, indicating that human error is a judgment made in hindsight, whereas actual performance makes sense to workers at the time. Support for the new view is drawn from recent research into accidents as emergent phenomena without clear "root causes;" where deviance has become a generally accepted standard of normal operations; and where organizations reveal "messy interiors" no matter whether they are predisposed to an accident or not.
PubMed ID
12820909 View in PubMed
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Acetylcholine receptor antibodies in myasthenia gravis are associated with greater risk of diabetes and thyroid disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168193
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2006 Aug;114(2):124-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
C. Toth
D. McDonald
J. Oger
K. Brownell
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary and the Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. corytoth@shaw.ca
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2006 Aug;114(2):124-32
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Autoantibodies - blood
Causality
Child
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myasthenia Gravis - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Cholinergic - immunology
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Sex Distribution
Thymoma - immunology - physiopathology
Thymus Neoplasms - immunology - physiopathology
Thyroid Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Abstract
Myasthenia gravis (MG) may be associated with the presence of acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChRAb) [seropositive MG (SPMG)] or their absence [seronegative MG (SNMG)]. Along with features of MG, the presence of the AChRAb may relate to the existence of other immune-mediated diseases. We sought to determine the association of SPMG with other potential autoimmune diseases.
A retrospective evaluation of prospectively identified MG patients at a tertiary care center was performed, with patients separated into SPMG and SNMG. Prevalence of other immune-mediated disorders, as well as the epidemiology, sensitivity of diagnostic testing, and thymic pathology, was contrasted between both patient groups.
Of the 109 MG patients identified, 66% were SPMG. SPMG was associated with a greater likelihood of significant repetitive stimulation decrement, the presence of either thymoma or thymic hyperplasia, and the presence of thyroid disease. In addition, all patients with a diagnosis of diabetes, concurrent with MG, were found to be SPMG.
AChRAb and SPMG impart not only a distinctive clinical and electrophysiological phenotype of MG, but are also associated with the heightened presence of endocrinological disease.
PubMed ID
16867036 View in PubMed
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Acute bacterial meningitis in adults. A 20-year overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34360
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1997 Feb 24;157(4):425-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1997
Author
B. Sigurdardóttir
O M Björnsson
K E Jónsdóttir
H. Erlendsdóttir
S. Gudmundsson
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland Medical School, Landspitalinn (National University Hospital), Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1997 Feb 24;157(4):425-30
Date
Feb-24-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Causality
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Meningitis, Bacterial - cerebrospinal fluid - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality - therapy
Middle Aged
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most clinical overviews of acute bacterial meningitis have either focused on children or all age groups combined, although the disease poses serious problems in the adult population. OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical and microbiological features of adult bacterial meningitis in Iceland, as a representative of the average European or North American community. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data on a total of 132 cases in 127 patients (age, > or = 16 years) who were diagnosed as having acute bacterial meningitis in Iceland during the years 1975 to 1994 were collected from patient and laboratory records. Complete hospital records were found for 119 of the 132 cases identified. RESULTS: The annual incidence was 1.7/100,000 to 7.2/ 100,000 inhabitants (mean, 3.8/100,000). The most common causative organisms were Neisseria meningitidis (56%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (20%), Listeria monocytogenes (6%), and Haemophilus influenzae (5%). Neisseria meningitidis caused 93% of the infections in the 16- to 20-year-old age group, but it caused only 25% of the infections in patients aged 45 years or older. Listeria monocytogenes caused 14% of these cases. Cases of nosocomial and recurrent meningitis were rare. A significant underlying illness or condition was present in 39% of the patients. The mean mortality was 19.7%, and it did not change during the study period. CONCLUSIONS: In a study that involved all adult patients with bacterial meningitis in a single country for 2 decades, meningococci and pneumococci were the most frequent causative agents. However, meningococci were responsible for only one fourth of the cases among adult patients aged 45 years or older, most of these cases were caused by pneumococci and Listeria. Despite modern medical developments, approximately 20% of adult patients with bacterial meningitis died.
PubMed ID
9046894 View in PubMed
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625 records – page 1 of 63.