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The 2000 tularemia outbreak: a case-control study of risk factors in disease-endemic and emergent areas, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188853
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;8(9):956-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Henrik Eliasson
Johan Lindbäck
J Pekka Nuorti
Malin Arneborn
Johan Giesecke
Anders Tegnell
Author Affiliation
Orebro University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;8(9):956-60
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Bites and Stings - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Cat Diseases - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Culicidae - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Vectors
Female
Francisella tularensis
Humans
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tularemia - epidemiology - pathology - transmission
Abstract
A widespread outbreak of tularemia in Sweden in 2000 was investigated in a case-control study in which 270 reported cases of tularemia were compared with 438 controls. The outbreak affected parts of Sweden where tularemia had hitherto been rare, and these "emergent" areas were compared with the disease-endemic areas. Multivariate regression analysis showed mosquito bites to be the main risk factor, with an odds ratio (OR) of 8.8. Other risk factors were owning a cat (OR 2.5) and farm work (OR 3.2). Farming was a risk factor only in the disease-endemic area. Swollen lymph nodes and wound infections were more common in the emergent area, while pneumonia was more common in the disease-endemic area. Mosquito bites appear to be important in transmission of tularemia. The association between cat ownership and disease merits further investigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12194773 View in PubMed
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Ability of vaccine strain induced antibodies to neutralize field isolates of caliciviruses from Swedish cats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276779
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Dec 12;57:86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-2015
Author
Jonas Johansson Wensman
Ayman Samman
Anna Lindhe
Jean-Christophe Thibault
Louise Treiberg Berndtsson
Margaret J Hosie
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Dec 12;57:86
Date
Dec-12-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Antibodies, Viral - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Caliciviridae Infections - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Calicivirus, Feline - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Cat Diseases - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Cats - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Neutralization Tests - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Sweden - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Viral Vaccines - immunology - immunology - veterinary - virology - immunology - immunology - virology - veterinary - immunology
Abstract
Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a common cause of upper respiratory tract disease in cats worldwide. Its characteristically high mutation rate leads to escape from the humoral immune response induced by natural infection and/or vaccination and consequently vaccines are not always effective against field isolates. Thus, there is a need to continuously investigate the ability of FCV vaccine strain-induced antibodies to neutralize field isolates.
Seventy-eight field isolates of FCV isolated during the years 2008-2012 from Swedish cats displaying clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease were examined in this study. The field isolates were tested for cross-neutralization using a panel of eight anti-sera raised in four pairs of cats following infection with four vaccine strains (F9, 255, G1 and 431).
The anti-sera raised against F9 and 255 neutralised 20.5 and 11.5 %, and 47.4 and 64.1 % of field isolates tested, respectively. The anti-sera against the more recently introduced vaccine strains G1 and 431 neutralized 33.3 and 55.1 % (strain G1) or 69.2 and 89.7 % (strain 431) of the field isolates with titres =5. [corrected]. Dual vaccine strains displayed a higher cross-neutralization.
This study confirms previous observations that more recently introduced vaccine strains induce antibodies with a higher neutralizing capacity compared to vaccine strains that have been used extensively over a long period of time. This study also suggests that dual FCV vaccine strains might neutralize more field isolates compared to single vaccine strains. Vaccine strains should ideally be selected based on updated knowledge on the antigenic properties of field isolates in the local setting, and there is thus a need for continuously studying the evolution of FCV together with the neutralizing capacity of vaccine strain induced antibodies against field isolates at a national and/or regional level.
Notes
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Erratum In: Acta Vet Scand. 2016;58:1426888695
PubMed ID
26655039 View in PubMed
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[A case of human infection with brucellosis from a cat]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36213
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Repina
A I Nikulina
I A Kosilov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Brucella - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Vectors
English Abstract
Female
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Male
Mice
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Virulence
Abstract
The epidemiological study of a focus of Brucella infection revealed that an outbreak of brucellosis occurred in a small town, and the source of this infection was a domestic cat. As the result of contacts with this cat, six persons, among them three children aged 3, 8 and 12 years, had brucellosis. In all these patients acute brucellosis was diagnosed. Simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of the disease, a rise in antibody titer from 1:50 to 1:1,600 was observed. Brucella cultures isolated from the blood of one of the patients and from the internal organs of the cat exhibited the properties, similar to those of "rodent" strains, i. e. their differential signs permit their classification with B. suis, serovar 5.
PubMed ID
8067119 View in PubMed
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[Acetylcholine-cholinesterase-choline acetylase system in the brain tissue of cats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13358
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1974 Jan-Feb;46(1):54-6
Publication Type
Article

Activation and suppression of shivering during septal and hypothalamic stimulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298675
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-16. 36 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1962
, Wash. 2. Rpt. AAL-TDR-62- 16. ACTIVATION AND SUPPRESSIO 3. OF SHIVERING DURING SEPTAL AND HYPOTHALAMIC 4. STIMULATION1. September 1962. 36 p. incl. illus, 5. tables, 5 7 ref. 6. Unclassified Report I. In acute experiments on 38 lightly anesthe tized cats, the I II. septal region of the
  1 document  
Author
Stuart, D.G.
Kawamura, Y.
Hemingway, A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-16. 36 p.
Date
September 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3377461
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Cats
Shivering
Hypothalamus
Brain
Stimulation
Abstract
In acute experiments on 38 lightly anesthetized cats, the septal region of the forebrain and the hypothalamus were explored for loci whose activation by electrical stimulation produced, suppressed or failed to affect shivering. Shivering was consistently and repeatedly produced by stimulation of the dorso-medial region of the posterior hypothalamus, and sometimes by stimulation of the ventrolateral region of the septum. A greater intensity of stimulus was needed to produce more latent and less intense shivering during septal than during hypothalamic stimulation. Similarly, more intense stimulation was necessary to suppress shivering during ventromedial septal stimulation than during anterior, or ventrolateral posterior hypothalamic stimulation. The most effective stimulation frequency for both activation and suppression of shivering was 50 pulses/sec, i.e. fivefold the evoked or suppressed limb tremor frequency. On the basis of these results it was concluded that septa! influences on shivering are secondary to a primary hypothalamic modulation of this tremor. Such modulation appears to be more concerned with initiation and maintenance than with the rhythm of shivering.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-16
Documents
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Adverse reactions of a2-adrenoceptor agonists in cats reported in 2003-2013 in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290379
Source
Vet Anaesth Analg. 2017 Jul; 44(4):803-810
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Marja R Raekallio
Marika Virtanen
Irmeli Happonen
Outi M Vainio
Author Affiliation
Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: marja.raekallio@helsinki.fi.
Source
Vet Anaesth Analg. 2017 Jul; 44(4):803-810
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists - adverse effects
Animals
Cat Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Cats
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Male
Pulmonary Edema - chemically induced - epidemiology - veterinary
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To describe suspected adverse drug reactions in cats associated with use of a2-adrenoceptor agonists.
Retrospective study.
A total of 90 cats.
Data were collected from reports on adverse reactions to veterinary medicines sent to the Finnish Medicines Agency during 2003-2013. All reports of suspected adverse reactions associated with use of a2-adrenoceptor agonists in cats were included. Probable pulmonary oedema was diagnosed based on post mortem or radiological examination, or presence of frothy or excess fluid from the nostrils or trachea. If only dyspnoea and crackles on auscultation were reported, possible pulmonary oedema was presumed.
Pulmonary oedema was suspected in 61 cases. Of these cats, 37 were categorised as probable and 24 as possible pulmonary oedema. The first clinical signs had been noted between 1 minute and 2 days (median, 15 minutes) after a2-adrenoceptor agonist administration. Many cats probably had no intravenous overhydration when the first clinical signs were detected, as either they presumably had no intravenous cannula or the signs appeared before, during or immediately after cannulation. Of the 61 cats, 43 survived, 14 died and for four the outcome was not clearly stated.
Pulmonary oedema is a perilous condition that may appear within minutes of an intramuscular administration of sedative or anaesthetic agent in cats. The symptoms were not caused by intravenous overhydration, at least in cats having no venous cannula when the first clinical signs were detected.
PubMed ID
28733105 View in PubMed
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Alaria alata Mesocercariae among Feral Cats and Badgers, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273160
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 Oct;21(10):1872-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Nao Takeuchi-Storm
Mohammed N S Al-Sabi
Stig M Thamsborg
Heidi L Enemark
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 Oct;21(10):1872-4
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cats - parasitology
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Mustelidae - parasitology
Sus scrofa - parasitology
Swine - parasitology
Trematoda - pathogenicity
Zoonoses - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Notes
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PubMed ID
26402302 View in PubMed
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Allergen avoidance does not alter airborne cat allergen levels in classrooms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15163
Source
Allergy. 2004 Jun;59(6):661-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
A-S Karlsson
A. Renström
M. Hedrén
K. Larsson
Author Affiliation
Lung and Allergy Research, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 287, S-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2004 Jun;59(6):661-7
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Allergens - analysis
Animals
Cats - immunology
Child
Environment, Controlled
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - analysis
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some schools in Sweden offer allergen avoidance classrooms for allergic children with severe asthma. However, the measures commonly used to achieve a reduction in allergen levels have not been properly evaluated. The aim of the present prospective study was to study whether the levels of airborne cat allergen are altered after introducing feasible intervention measures in classrooms, without interfering with peoples' freedom of choice regarding pet ownership. METHODS: Twenty-five classes, including five established allergy prevention classrooms participated in the study during a school year. After one term, six classes underwent a number of intervention measures recommended by the Swedish National Institute of Public Health. Curtains, upholstery and plants were removed, bookshelves were replaced with cupboards and regular cleaning was increased. Airborne dust was collected weekly (32 weeks) using duplicate Petri dishes (n = 1574) and on six occasions using two personal air samplers in each class (n = 264). RESULTS: Airborne cat allergen levels were showing a similar variability throughout the whole study in all classes. Despite extensive measures in order to reduce allergen exposure, cat allergen levels were unaltered in the six classes after intervention. Allergen levels were not significantly lower in the established allergy prevention classes, compared with the other classes. Cat allergen levels differed, however, significantly between classes with few and many cat owners (P
PubMed ID
15147452 View in PubMed
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Allergen content in dust from homes and schools in northern Norway in relation to sensitization and allergy symptoms in schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34349
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Mar;27(3):252-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
L K Dotterud
T D Van
B. Kvammen
T. Dybendal
S. Elsayed
E S Falk
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Tromsø, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Mar;27(3):252-61
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Cats
Child
Dogs
Dust
Glycoproteins - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - immunology
Mites - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown a high prevalence of atopic diseases among school children in the community of Sør-Varanger. Moreover, animal dander followed by pollen and house dust mite, were the most common allergens in skin prick tests. OBJECTIVE: To assess the allergen content in homes (living-rooms and mattresses) and classrooms of children living in an arctic area at 70 degrees. The presence of allergens in homes and schools and their relationship to atopy was of particular interest. METHODS: Dust samples from 38 homes and seven schools in northern Norway were collected by vacuum cleaning. The presence of allergens of dog, birch, timothy, Cladosporium herbarum, codfish and hen egg-white was investigated by radio-allergosorbent test (RAST) inhibition and the presence of major allergens of cat Felis domesticus (Fel d I) and house dust mites (HDM) Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p I) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f I) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RESULTS: Mattresses contained significantly more dust per unit area than living-rooms and classrooms. No statistically significant differences in allergen content for dog, birch, timothy. Cladosporium, codfish and hen egg-white were seen between HDM-sensitized and non-atopic children. Most dust samples contained dog allergens with the highest allergenic activity found in living-rooms of those keeping dogs. An increased level of Fel d I was detected in only one of 38 samples from living-rooms (this family kept a cat) and in 25 of 38 samples from mattresses with ranges from 24 to 84 ng/m2. The highest concentrations were found in mattresses of children keeping cats. Increased levels (> or = 25 ng/m2) of Der p I were found only in homes and virtually only in mattresses of HDM-sensitized children. An increased level of Der f I was found in only one case, i.e. in the mattress of an HDM-sensitized child where additionally Der p I and HDMs were demonstrated microscopically. When relating Der p I to HDM-sensitization an odds ratio of more than 16 (95% CI: 1.6-394.3) was found. All extracts from living-rooms included codfish allergens. Low RAST inhibition values were detected for hen egg-white. Cladosporium, birch and timothy pollen in most samples. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that dust from schools was relatively free of allergens. CONCLUSION: Previous findings indicating that the main allergen exposure problem in this geographical area is that of pet allergens were confirmed.
PubMed ID
9088651 View in PubMed
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388 records – page 1 of 39.