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1098 records – page 1 of 110.

A 10-year incidence of acute whiplash injuries after road traffic crashes in a defined population in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122426
Source
PM R. 2012 Oct;4(10):739-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Johan Styrke
Britt-Marie Stålnacke
Per-Olof Bylund
Peter Sojka
Ulf Björnstig
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. johan.styrke@surgery.umu.se
Source
PM R. 2012 Oct;4(10):739-47
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Automobiles
Bicycling
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Incidence
Insurance Claim Reporting - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Trauma Centers
Whiplash Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the annual incidence of acute whiplash injuries after road traffic crashes in a geographic catchment area in Northern Sweden during the period 2000-2009.
Descriptive epidemiology determined by prospectively collected data from a defined population.
The study was conducted at a public hospital in Sweden.
The population of the hospital's catchment area (136,600 inhabitants in 1999 and 144,500 in 2009).
At the emergency department, all injured persons (approximately 11,000 per year) were asked to answer a questionnaire about the injury incident. Data from the medical records also were analyzed. From 2000-2009, 15,506 persons were injured in vehicle crashes. Persons who were subject to an acute neck injury within whiplash-associated disorder grades 1-3 were included. The overall and annual incidences were calculated as incidence. Age, gender, type of injury event, and direction of impact were described. The incidences were compared with national statistics on insurance claims from 2003, 2007, and 2008 to detect changes in the proportions of claims.
The annual incidence of acute whiplash injuries. Secondary outcome measures were types of injury events, age and gender distribution, changes in the proportion of rear-end crashes during 2000-2009, and changes in the proportion of insurance claims during 2003-2008.
During 2000-2009, 3297 cases of acute whiplash injury were encountered. The overall incidence was 235/100,000/year. The average yearly increase in incidence was 1.0%. Women comprised 51.9% and men 48.1% of the injured. Car occupants (86.4%) and bicycle riders (6.1%) were most frequently injured. The proportion of rear-end crashes decreased from 55% to 45% from 2000-2009. The proportion of insurance claims significantly decreased between 2003 and 2008 (P
PubMed ID
22819305 View in PubMed
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[25-year experience of Sverdlovsk regional occupational center on the basis of the research institute].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198488
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(3):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
S G Domnin
E P Zhovtiak
A G Gol'del'man
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(3):30-3
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health Services - supply & distribution - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Sverdlovsk Regional Occupational Center based on the Research Institute has highly qualified staff, incorporates ambulatory department, hospital with modern diagnostic and therapeutic equipment. The Center performs multiple tasks, being an organizational and methodic, diagnostic and occupational examination institution using up-to-date advances in industrial medicine.
PubMed ID
10826371 View in PubMed
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The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
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[A category of patients with tuberculosis concomitant with HIV infection in an anti-TB facility].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184198
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2003;(5):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
F A Batyrov
O P Frolova
G N Zhukova
I G Sementsova
O I Mukhanova
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2003;(5):6-9
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Preventive Health Services
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Abstract
A category of patients with tuberculosis concomitant with HIV infection, who were admitted for inpatient care to the infection department of Tuberculosis Clinical Hospital No. 7, Moscow, during 1996-2001, was analyzed. Peculiarities of the mentioned patients' category (205 subjects) were studied at the anti-TB facility. It was established that males (83.4%), aged 21-30 (48.9%), as well as unemployed (71%) prevailed. As much as 14% of them were homeless and 33% had a prison history. Drug-addiction (76%) and hepatitis C and B (77%) were found to be the key concomitant pathologies in them. HIV was primarily diagnosed at the anti-TB facility in 52% of patients, while tuberculosis had set on before HIV in 34.8% of patients. A major part of patients with tuberculosis concomitant with HIV, who were at the anti-TB facility, had early HIV stages. Specific features of the clinical course of tuberculosis were defined for patients with early HIV stages. It was established that tuberculosis concomitant with early HIV stages is deprived of any peculiarities except for the primary signs' stage, if it has the form of an acute infection. An exacerbation of the tuberculosis process, which quite often leads to its generalization and fatal outcome, can happen during the mentioned period due to a pronounced immunodeficiency.
PubMed ID
12899005 View in PubMed
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Accessibility of tertiary hospitals in Finland: A comparison of administrative and normative catchment areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291196
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2017 06; 182:60-67
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-2017
Author
Tiina Huotari
Harri Antikainen
Timo Keistinen
Jarmo Rusanen
Author Affiliation
Geography Research Unit, University of Oulu, PO Box 3000, FI-90014, Finland. Electronic address: tiina.huotari@oulu.fi.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2017 06; 182:60-67
Date
06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health) - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Geographic Mapping
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Tertiary Care Centers - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Abstract
The determination of an appropriate catchment area for a hospital providing highly specialized (i.e. tertiary) health care is typically a trade-off between ensuring adequate client volumes and maintaining reasonable accessibility for all potential clients. This may pose considerable challenges, especially in sparsely inhabited regions. In Finland, tertiary health care is concentrated in five university hospitals, which provide services in their dedicated catchment areas. This study utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS), together with grid-based population data and travel-time estimates, to assess the spatial accessibility of these hospitals. The current geographical configuration of the hospitals is compared to a normative assignment, with and without capacity constraints. The aim is to define optimal catchment areas for tertiary hospitals so that their spatial accessibility is as equal as possible. The results indicate that relatively modest improvements can be achieved in accessibility by using normative assignment to determine catchment areas.
PubMed ID
28414937 View in PubMed
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Access to health care and geographic mobility of HIV/AIDS patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213684
Source
AIDS Patient Care. 1995 Dec;9(6):297-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
R S Hogg
M T Schechter
A. Schilder
R. Le
S A Strathdee
I L Goldstone
M V O'Shaughnessy
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital/University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
AIDS Patient Care. 1995 Dec;9(6):297-302
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Catchment Area (Health) - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care - standards - trends
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - therapy
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To determine the patterns and determinants of mobility in persons with HIV infection or AIDS on a population basis.
Descriptive cross-sectional population health study.
650 full members (i.e., HIV-positive) of the Vancouver Persons with AIDS Society who were residents of British Columbia and who allow the society to include unsolicited material with their monthly newsletter.
Migration history, access to HIV-related care at diagnosis, current and pre-HIV sociodemographic characteristics, and current health status.
Two hundred and fifty-two persons living with HIV/AIDS participated in the study. At the time of the survey, the majority of subjects were male (94 percent), aged between 30 and 54 years (87 percent), and able to carry out daily activities without assistance (84 percent). The median time since the known date of HIV infection was 6 years. Access to care at diagnosis was associated in this population with being diagnosed in the largest metropolitan area in the province (OR = 2.14; 95 percent CI: 1.18, 3.87), a pre-HIV income of $30,000 or more per annum (OR = 0.49; 95 percent CI: 0.27, 0.89), a known date of diagnosis prior to 1990 (78 percent versus 64 percent; p = 0.019), and living in the same residence from the date of known HIV diagnosis to the date of the survey (63 percent versus 51 percent; p = 0.024).
Although no definitive causal association can be provided by this cross-sectional analysis, our results clearly highlight several ways in which the need for treatment and care potentially affect where persons with HIV/AIDS choose to live.
PubMed ID
11361439 View in PubMed
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Source
J Trauma. 2010 Dec;69(6):1350-61; discussion 1361
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Syed Morad Hameed
Nadine Schuurman
Tarek Razek
Darrell Boone
Rardi Van Heest
Tracey Taulu
Nasira Lakha
David C Evans
D Ross Brown
Andrew W Kirkpatrick
Henry T Stelfox
Dianne Dyer
Mary van Wijngaarden-Stephens
Sarvesh Logsetty
Avery B Nathens
Tanya Charyk-Stewart
Sandro Rizoli
Lorraine N Tremblay
Frederick Brenneman
Najma Ahmed
Elsie Galbraith
Neil Parry
Murray J Girotti
Guiseppe Pagliarello
Nancy Tze
Kosar Khwaja
Natalie Yanchar
John M Tallon
J Andrew I Trenholm
Candance Tegart
Ofer Amram
Myriam Berube
Usmaan Hameed
Richard K Simons
Author Affiliation
Research Committee of the Trauma Association of Canada, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. morad.hameed@vch.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Dec;69(6):1350-61; discussion 1361
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Catchment Area (Health)
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Centers
Travel
Abstract
Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity, potential years of life lost and health care expenditure in Canada and around the world. Trauma systems have been established across North America to provide comprehensive injury care and to lead injury control efforts. We sought to describe the current status of trauma systems in Canada and Canadians' access to acute, multidisciplinary trauma care.
A national survey was used to identify the locations and capabilities of adult trauma centers across Canada and to identify the catchment populations they serve. Geographic information science methods were used to map the locations of Level I and Level II trauma centers and to define 1-hour road travel times around each trauma center. Data from the 2006 Canadian Census were used to estimate populations within and outside 1-hour access to definitive trauma care.
In Canada, 32 Level I and Level II trauma centers provide definitive trauma care and coordinate the efforts of their surrounding trauma systems. Most Canadians (77.5%) reside within 1-hour road travel catchments of Level I or Level II centers. However, marked geographic disparities in access persist. Of the 22.5% of Canadians who live more than an hour away from a Level I or Level II trauma centers, all are in rural and remote regions.
Access to high quality acute trauma care is well established across parts of Canada but a clear urban/rural divide persists. Regional efforts to improve short- and long-term outcomes after severe trauma should focus on the optimization of access to pre-hospital care and acute trauma care in rural communities using locally relevant strategies or novel care delivery options.
PubMed ID
20838258 View in PubMed
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[Accumulation and prevalence of consequences of head injury in the population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193692
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2001;101(5):46-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
K F Agaeva
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2001;101(5):46-8
Date
2001
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Brain Injuries - complications - epidemiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper presents some methodological problems concerning modeling of the processes of accumulation and prevalence of the pathological states caused by head injury in the population. The trend in the number of annual cases of new injuries of the head is estimated for at least 10 years for different age groups of the population. The average indices are estimated together with the limits of their fluctuations. Taking into consideration the mean expectation of life both the average annual quantity of the individuals with head injury in the anamnesis and probability of their accumulation are determined. This index equals to 22.22 per 1000. The frequency of the craniocerebral traumas was estimated in comparison with the total quantity of head injuries: 18.7 +/- 3.18% for children; 38.6 +/- 3.97% for the adults.
PubMed ID
11505916 View in PubMed
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[Accumulation of heavy metals in biologic materials of mining workers and of nearby population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176713
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
M A Mukasheva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The article contains results concerning spectral analysis of biologic materials (blood and hair) for heavy metals content. These results helped to reveal health risk factors for workers engaged into chromium ores extraction and for nearby residents.
PubMed ID
15636126 View in PubMed
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1098 records – page 1 of 110.