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[Acute enterovirus uveitis in infants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29564
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2005 May-Jun;50(3):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Lashkevich
G A Koroleva
A N Lukashev
E V Denisova
L A Katargina
I P Khoroshilova-Maslova
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2005 May-Jun;50(3):36-45
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Cataract - etiology
Cross Reactions
Disease Models, Animal
Disease Outbreaks
Echovirus Infections - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
English Abstract
Enterovirus B, Human - genetics - immunology
Epidemiology, Molecular
Eye - virology
Glaucoma - etiology
Humans
Infant
Iris - pathology
Neutralization Tests
Phylogeny
Primates
Pupil Disorders
RNA, Viral - genetics
Russia - epidemiology
Uveitis - blood - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Enterovirus uveitis (EU) is a new infant eye disease that was first detected and identified in Russia in 1980-1981. Three subtypes of human echoviruses (EV19K, EV11A, and EV11/B) caused 5 nosocomial outbreaks of EU in different Siberian cities and towns in 1980-1989, by affecting more than 750 children mainly below one year of age. Sporadic and focal EU cases (more than 200) were also retrospectively diagnosed in other regions of Russia and in different countries of the former Soviet Union. There were following clinical manifestations: common symptoms of the infection; acute uveitis (rapid focal iridic destruction, pupillary deformities, formation of membranes in the anterior chamber of the eye); and in 15-30% of cases severe complications, cataract, glaucoma, vision impairments. Uveitis strains EV19 and EV11 caused significant uveitis in primates after inoculation into the anterior chamber of the eye, as well as sepsis-like fatal disease with liver necrosis after venous infection. The uveitis strains are phylogenetically and pathogenetically close for primates to strains EV19 and EV11 isolated from young children with sepsis-like disease. The contents of this review have been published in the Reviews in Medical Virology, 2004, vol. 14, p. 241-254.
PubMed ID
16078433 View in PubMed
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Advances in pharmacological strategies for the prevention of cataract development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151401
Source
Indian J Ophthalmol. 2009 May-Jun;57(3):175-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
S K Gupta
V Kalai Selvan
S S Agrawal
Rohit Saxena
Author Affiliation
Delhi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, Sector 3, Pushp Vihar, New Delhi-110 017, India. skgup@hotmail.com
Source
Indian J Ophthalmol. 2009 May-Jun;57(3):175-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aldehyde Reductase - antagonists & inhibitors
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Cataract - etiology - prevention & control
Glutathione - administration & dosage
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Risk factors
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Cataractous-opacification of the lens is one of the leading causes of blindness in India. The situation can be managed by surgical removal of the cataractous lens. Various pharmacological strategies have been proposed for the prevention and treatment of cataract. Information on possible benefits of putative anticataract agents comes from a variety of approaches, ranging from laboratory experiments, both in vitro and in vivo , to epidemiological studies in patients. This review deals with the various mechanisms, and possible pharmacological interventions for the prevention of cataract. The article also reviews research on potential anticataractous agents, including aldose reductase inhibitors, glutathione boosters, antiglycating agents, vitamins and various drugs from indigenous sources.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19384010 View in PubMed
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After-cataract and secondary glaucoma in the aphakic infant rabbit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50851
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Sep;26(9):1398-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
U. Kugelberg
A. Lundvall
B. Lundgren
J B Holmén
C. Zetterström
Author Affiliation
St Erik Eye Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. ulla.kugelberg@ophste.hs.sll.se
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Sep;26(9):1398-402
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Anterior Chamber
Aphakia, Postcataract - complications
Cataract - etiology - pathology
Comparative Study
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage
Glaucoma - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Immunosuppressive Agents - administration & dosage
Injections
Intraocular Pressure - physiology
Lens Capsule, Crystalline - pathology
Phacoemulsification - adverse effects
Postoperative Complications - pathology
Rabbits
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the association between after-cataract and secondary glaucoma after lensectomy and 5-fluorouracil treatment in an experimental infant rabbit model. SETTING: St Erik Eye Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. METHODS: Lensectomy was performed in both eyes of 16 3-week-old rabbits. One randomly selected eye in each rabbit was injected with 2.5 mg of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) at surgery and 5.0 mg the day after surgery to reduce the formation of after-cataract. Axial length, corneal thickness, corneal diameter, and intraocular pressure were measured preoperatively and 4 times during the 6 months following surgery. Six months after surgery, the wet weight of the after-cataract was determined. RESULTS: In 16 aphakic eyes treated with 5-FU, no or a minimal amount (0.10 g); 8 of these developed glaucoma. The other 6 eyes had no or minimal after-cataract and did not develop secondary glaucoma. The relationship between after-cataract and secondary glaucoma was statistically significant. CONCLUSION: A significant relationship between the amount of after-cataract and the development of secondary glaucoma was found in aphakic infant rabbit eyes.
PubMed ID
11020626 View in PubMed
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After-cataract in children having cataract surgery with or without anterior vitrectomy implanted with a single-piece AcrySof IOL.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29715
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2005 Apr;31(4):757-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Maria Kugelberg
Ulla Kugelberg
Nadiya Bobrova
Svetlana Tronina
Charlotta Zetterström
Author Affiliation
St. Erik's Eye Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. m.kugelberg@sankterik.se
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2005 Apr;31(4):757-62
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylic Resins
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anterior Eye Segment - surgery
Capsulorhexis
Cataract - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Lens Capsule, Crystalline - pathology - surgery
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Lenses, Intraocular
Male
Postoperative Complications
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vitrectomy - methods
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate whether cataract surgery in children should be performed with anterior vitrectomy and to examine the properties of the AcrySof SA30AL intraocular lens (IOL) in the pediatric eye. SETTING: Filatov Institute, Odessa, Ukraine. METHODS: Cataract surgery was performed in 66 children aged 3 to 15 years. They were randomized to surgery with or without anterior vitrectomy. All eyes were implanted with the single-piece AcrySof SA30AL IOL (Alcon). During the study, the patients who needed surgery for after-cataract had a second surgical procedure. Two years after surgery, the surgical method was evaluated using exact logistic regression. Also, the Evaluation of Posterior Capsule Opacification (EPCO) score was compared between the patients who had surgery for after-cataract and the patients who did not need this. The presence of posterior synechias and centration of the IOL were assessed. RESULTS: Children in the younger age group (
PubMed ID
15899453 View in PubMed
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Age-related telomere shortening occurs in lens epithelium from old rats and is slowed by caloric restriction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50817
Source
Exp Eye Res. 2001 Aug;73(2):221-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
W R Pendergrass
P E Penn
J. Li
N S Wolf
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.
Source
Exp Eye Res. 2001 Aug;73(2):221-8
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Cataract - etiology
Cells, Cultured
Diet, Reducing
Epithelial Cells - cytology
Fibroblasts - ultrastructure
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Interphase - physiology
Lens, Crystalline - cytology
Metaphase - physiology
Nucleic Acid Probes
Rats
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics, nonparametric
Telomere - ultrastructure
Abstract
We have investigated whether the average relative telomere length of lens epithelial cells (LECs) from brown Norway rats decreases with the age of the donor animal, and whether chronic caloric restriction (CR) of the rats delays the telomere shortening. Our previous studies have demonstrated that clonal proliferative potential of rodent LECs as well as the in vivo rate of DNA synthesis decreases with age and that this decrease is slowed by chronic lifelong caloric restriction (CR). In order to determine if telomeric shortening might be involved in this loss of proliferative potential, we examined relative telomeric lengths in young, old ad lib fed (AL), and old calorically restricted (CR) brown Norway rats. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization with a peptide nucleic acid probe (PNA) complementary to the telomeric repeat sequence to quantitate relative telomere lengths in LECs in lens sections (TELO-FISH). Control experiments demonstrated that the PNA probe binding was restricted almost entirely to the terminal portions of the rat chromosomes with less than 5% bound at interstitial sites in typical metaphase spreads. The relative telomere lengths of interphase human fibroblast standards, as determined by TELO-FISH, were in good agreement with terminal restriction fragment analyses of the same standards and with literature values for rat cells. The average telomere lengths of interphase nuclei in the old AL rat LECs were found to be 21% shorter than paired young AL controls (P
PubMed ID
11446772 View in PubMed
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An alternative method of steroid-induced lens opacification in brown norway rat eyes applying systemic pulse administration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50617
Source
Ophthalmic Res. 2004 Jul-Aug;36(4):231-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kouta Nagai
Hiroshi Sasaki
Masami Kojima
Kazuyuki Sasaki
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa, Japan. k-nagai@kanazawa-med.ac.jp
Source
Ophthalmic Res. 2004 Jul-Aug;36(4):231-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cataract - etiology - pathology
Disease Models, Animal
Glucocorticoids - administration & dosage - toxicity
Lens, Crystalline - drug effects - pathology
Male
Ophthalmic Solutions - administration & dosage
Prednisolone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - toxicity
Pulse Therapy, Drug
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Abstract
PURPOSE: To confirm whether long-term administration of prednisolone sodium succinate (prednisolone) alone is able to induce cataract in rat eyes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 1% solution of prednisolone was administered topically as eye drops to Brown Norway rat eyes, and a systemic pulse administration of 10 mg/kg/day was given via the tail vein. Both administration methods were applied in different combinations. Eighty-three 6-week-old male rats were divided into 8 groups: group 1 = control; group 2 = topical instillation every day; group 3 = single pulse; group 4 = single pulse + eye drops; group 5 = 3 times pulse; group 6 = 3 times pulse + eye drops; group 7 = 3 times pulse per 2 months; group 8 = 3 times pulse per 2 months + eye drops. Observations for changes of lens transparency were made by slitlamp microscopy and documented by an anterior eye segment analysis system (Nidek EAS-1000) from the onset of drug administration to a maximum period of 16 months. RESULTS: Lens opacity in the shallow anterior and posterior lens layers developed from the tenth month following commencement of prednisolone administration. The incidence of anterior and/or posterior cortical cataract at the sixteenth month was 15% in group 2, 12.5% in group 5, 25% in group 6, 17.9% in group 7 and 35.3% in group 8. The lenses of groups 1, 3 and 4 maintained their transparency throughout the observation period. Light scattering intensity in groups 8 and 7 was the highest, followed by groups 6 and 5, then groups 2, 4, 3 and 1. CONCLUSION: Cortical cataract was successfully induced in Brown Norway rat eyes by sustained administration of prednisolone succinate alone applied as systemic pulse.
PubMed ID
15292662 View in PubMed
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Cataracta ossea and other intraocular ossifications. A case report and a thirty-year Danish material.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42519
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1975 Nov;53(5):790-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1975
Author
H. Fledelius
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1975 Nov;53(5):790-7
Date
Nov-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cataract - etiology - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Eye Diseases - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures
Ossification, Heterotopic - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
Cataracta ossea is described in a 5-year-old Danish boy, representing a sequal to a unilateral measles-endophthalmitis 3 years earlier. Ossification was not demonstrated elsewhere in the eye. Further, cases of intraocular ossification over a 30-year period were reviewed, based on the files of the Eye Pathology Institute. The total of 155 made up about 3% of enucleated eyes from Danish material received for examination. Regarding age at the initial eye lesion, more than half appeared within the first decade of life. The most frequent underlying lesions were trauma (32%) and uveitis (25%). Among the less frequent causes, emphasis is given to three cases of malignant uveal melanoma. Ossification of the lens was not encountered in the series - except for the case which motivated the review.
PubMed ID
811078 View in PubMed
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Clinical and morphological characteristics of chorioretinal degeneration in early aging OXYS rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88840
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2008 Oct;146(4):455-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Zhdankina A A
Fursova A Zh
Logvinov S V
Kolosova N G
Author Affiliation
Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, Russia.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2008 Oct;146(4):455-8
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Anoxia - physiopathology
Cataract - etiology - pathology
Choroid Diseases - etiology - pathology
Disease Models, Animal
Macular Degeneration - etiology - pathology
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Retina - pathology
Abstract
OXYS rats are characterized by early development of cataract and chorioretinal degeneration with clinical manifestations similar to those observed in senile cataract and age-associated macular degeneration in humans. According to fundoscopy findings, the incidence of chorioretinal degeneration sharply increases in OXYS rats by the age of 4.5 months, when all animals develop signs of fundus oculi pathology. Morphological analysis of semithin sections of the posterior wall of the eye in OXYS rats aged 5 months showed that choroid vessels, pigmented epithelium, and radial glia were most vulnerable to injury. Retinal hypoxia and destruction of the pigmented epithelium associated with circulatory disorders in the choroid vessels presumably lead to injuries of the neurosensory cells (mainly the external segments) and a 3.5-fold increase in the percent of photoreceptors with nuclear pyknosis in comparison with the control. These results indicate that OXYS rats represent an adequate model of age-associated macular degeneration and can be used for studies of the pathogenesis of this condition and development of methods for its treatment and prevention.
PubMed ID
19489319 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.