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91 records – page 1 of 10.

A 10-year population-based cohort analysis of cataract surgery rates in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162363
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2007 Aug;42(4):552-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Wendy V Hatch
Geta Cernat
Shaun Singer
Chaim M Bell
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Ont.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2007 Aug;42(4):552-6
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cataract - epidemiology
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We studied the rates and distribution of cataract surgery throughout Ontario using population-based administrative data.
We identified patients who had had cataract surgery performed between April 1, 1994, and March 31, 2005. We calculated crude cataract surgery rates, overall and regional adjusted rates per 100,000 residents aged 65 and over, and age- and sex-specific rates.
The number of cataract surgeries performed on patients over 65 more than doubled, from 43,818 to 90,183, over the 10-year period and accounted for approximately 81% of all cataract surgeries in Ontario. Age- and sex-adjusted rates varied considerably among health administrative geographic regions. For 2004-2005, rates including all cataract surgeries ranged from 4272 to 6563 cataract surgeries per 100,000 residents aged 65 or older.
There has been a significant increase in the number of cataract surgeries performed over the past decade in Ontario with considerable regional variation. Observed rates were higher than those reported for other countries.
PubMed ID
17641696 View in PubMed
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Abnormalities of cornea, lens and retina. Survey findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2704
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
Wyatt, H.T.
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Date
1973
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Corneal scarring
Labrador keratopathy
Pterygium
Degenerative retinal disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cataract - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cornea
European Continental Ancestry Group
Eye Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Lens, Crystalline
Middle Aged
Retinal Diseases - epidemiology
Vision
Visual acuity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation 2521.
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Action spectra affect variability of the climatology of biologically effective ultraviolet radiation on cloud-free days.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108780
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2013 Dec;157(4):491-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
D. Grifoni
G. Zipoli
F. Sabatini
G. Messeri
L. Bacci
Author Affiliation
CNR - Institute of Biometeorology, Via Madonna del Piano, 10, Sesto Fiorentino, FI 50019, Italy.
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2013 Dec;157(4):491-8
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmosphere
Cataract - epidemiology
Climate
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Erythema - epidemiology
Eye - radiation effects
Germany
Humans
Italy
Keratitis - epidemiology
Norway
Plants - radiation effects
Quality Control
Seasons
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - biosynthesis
Weather
Abstract
Action spectrum (AS) describes the relative effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in producing biological effects and allows spectral UV irradiance to be weighted in order to compute biologically effective UV radiation (UVBE). The aim of this research was to study the seasonal and latitudinal distribution over Europe of daily UVBE doses responsible for various biological effects on humans and plants. Clear sky UV radiation spectra were computed at 30-min time intervals for the first day of each month of the year for Rome, Potsdam and Trondheim using a radiative transfer model fed with climatological data. Spectral data were weighted using AS for erythema, vitamin D synthesis, cataract and photokeratitis for humans, while the generalised plant damage and the plant damage AS were used for plants. The daily UVBE doses for the above-mentioned biological processes were computed and are analysed in this study. The patterns of variation due to season (for each location) and latitude (for each date) resulted as being specific for each adopted AS. The biological implications of these results are briefly discussed highlighting the importance of a specific UVBE climatology for each biological process.
PubMed ID
23843425 View in PubMed
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Age-related cataract is associated with type 2 diabetes and statin use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122615
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 2012 Aug;89(8):1165-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Carolyn M Machan
Patricia K Hrynchak
Elizabeth L Irving
Author Affiliation
School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 2012 Aug;89(8):1165-71
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cataract - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - pharmacology
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Diabetes has been shown to be a risk factor for age-related (AR) cataract. As statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) are now commonly prescribed for patients with type 2 diabetes, their impact on AR cataract prevalence should be considered. This study determines associations between AR cataract, type 2 diabetes, and reported statin use in a large optometric clinic population.
In all, 6397 patient files (ages 38 years) was 56% for those with type 2 diabetes and 16% for those without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was significantly associated with nuclear sclerosis (OR = 1.62, 1.14-2.29) and cortical cataract (OR = 1.37, 1.02-1.83). Statin use was associated with nuclear sclerosis (OR = 1.48, 1.09-2.00) and posterior subcapsular cataract (OR = 1.48, 1.07-2.04). The 50% probability of cataract in statin users occurred at age 51.7 and 54.9 years in patients with type 2 diabetes and without diabetes, respectively. In non-statin users, it was significantly later at age 55.1 and 57.3 years for patients with type 2 diabetes and without diabetes, respectively (p
PubMed ID
22797512 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of cataracts in seawater farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50807
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2001 Aug 2;45(3):229-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2-2001
Author
C. Ersdal
P J Midtlyng
J. Jarp
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2001 Aug 2;45(3):229-36
Date
Aug-2-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body Weight
Cataract - epidemiology - pathology - veterinary
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Fisheries
Norway - epidemiology
Otoscopes - veterinary
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salmo salar
Seasons
Seawater
Abstract
Cataracts in farmed Atlantic salmon have been known for many years, but the aetiology and importance of the disease have not been clarified. A cross-sectional field study of 51 cages of Atlantic salmon at 49 randomly selected sea sites was performed during the summer of 1998. The target population was spring and autumn entry groups of the 1997 generation salmon. Approximately 15 fish from each cage, altogether 777 fish, were autopsied by the same person. Each eye of the fish was scored for cataracts on a scale from 0 to 4 using an otoscope lamp with magnification. The weight and length of each fish were measured. The prevalence of cataracts was 83 % and 79% in spring entry groups and autumn entry groups, respectively. The overall mean cataract index (mean score of both eyes) was 1.23, being significantly higher in the spring entry groups (1.36) than the autumn entry groups (0.85). The final results in the spring entry groups showed that the fish groups with higher weight at sea transfer also had a higher cataract index at inspection. The risk of development of cataracts varied significantly among the offspring from the 5 strains represented in the study. Fish from sites located in 2 counties in the southern part of Norway had a significantly higher cataract index than fish farmed in the northernmost county in the study. For the autumn entry groups none of the explanatory variables was significant. In the spring entry groups a significant negative relationship was observed between the cataract score and the weight of the fish at the time of inspection (Pearson's r = -0.17), while the corresponding correlation for the autumn released groups was r = -0.10. Among the spring entry groups the average weight of the fish with the highest cataract score was estimated to about a third of the weight of the fish with no visible cataracts.
PubMed ID
11558732 View in PubMed
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An investigation of the relationship between cataract surgery wait times and rates of surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126995
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2012 Feb;47(1):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
William G Hodge
Timothy Ramsay
Dean Fergusson
Francie Si
Irene Pan
Yinghua Su
Ralf Buhrmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont. William.Hodge@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2012 Feb;47(1):11-5
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cataract - epidemiology
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The relationship between cataract surgery wait times and rates of surgery was investigated to determine whether wait times correlate with rates of surgery.
Cross-sectional study.
We collected 2 Ontario registries for cataract surgeries: (i) Cancer Care Ontario wait time registry; and (ii) The Ontario Health Insurance Plan billing records.
Both registries were used to determine whether wait times correlated with rates of surgery, and the data were then stratified by region of the province, priority (severity) of cases, age, and sex.
The total number of surgeries performed between April 2, 2007, and March 31, 2008, was 65,520. The overall mean number of wait days was 69.8 days; the mean patient age was 72.5 years; and the surgery rate was 540.3 per 100,000 members of the population. For high-priority cases (priorities 1 and 2), there was a very weak inverse correlation (p = -0.27 and -0.21) between wait time and surgery rate, whereas the overall correlation between wait time and surgical rate was close to zero in both databases, regardless of the region, the patients' ages, and the patients' genders.
This study demonstrates a very weak correlation between wait times for and rates of cataract surgery, and this should be a concern for policy makers. Further study is needed to see whether this null relationship persists over time and whether it exists for other monitored wait time procedures. Reasons for this null relationship will have to be determined and remedied as the use of wait times becomes a more widespread outcome in Canadian Healthcare.
PubMed ID
22333844 View in PubMed
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Autosomal recessive juvenile cataract in Hutterites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235099
Source
Ophthalmic Paediatr Genet. 1987 Jun;8(2):119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
W G Pearce
J A Mackay
T M Holmes
K. Morgan
S B Fowlow
M H Shokeir
R B Lowry
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Ophthalmic Paediatr Genet. 1987 Jun;8(2):119-24
Date
Jun-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Cataract - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Consanguinity
Female
Genes, Recessive
Heterozygote Detection - methods
Humans
Male
Pedigree
Religion
Saskatchewan
Abstract
Autosomal recessive inheritance of juvenile cataract is described amongst several related sibships of Lehrerleut Hutterites. The main features of the cataract include onset between three and seven years of age; rapid progression to maturity within one to three months; normal intelligence; no systemic associations, and no urinary reducing substances and normal erythrocyte galactokinase activity. Genetic analysis demonstrates the close relationship between parents of affected sibships with a coefficient of inbreeding of affected sibships of 0.0512. Estimates of heterozygote frequency within Lehrerleut Hutterites at 0.128 indicate that if current inbreeding practice continues additional cases can be expected.
PubMed ID
3658338 View in PubMed
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[Background radiation and the incidence of cataract among inhabitants of the Far North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240380
Source
Gig Sanit. 1984 Jul;(7):30-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1984

91 records – page 1 of 10.