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A 3-year follow-up of participation in peer support groups after a cardiac event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53243
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Otto Torells Gata 16, Varberg 432 44, Sweden. Catherine.Hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peer Group
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Abstract
Secondary prevention is an important component of a structured rehabilitation programme following a cardiac event. Comprehensive programmes have been developed in many European countries, the vast majority of which are hospital based. In Sweden, all patients with cardiac disease are also given the opportunity to participate in secondary prevention activities arranged by the National Association for Heart and Lung Patients [The Heart & Lung School (HL)]. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal study was to compare persons who attended the HL after a cardiac event and those who declined participation, with regard to health aspects, life situation, social network and support, clinical data, rehospitalisation and mortality. Totally 220 patients were included in the study. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire on four occasions, in addition to visiting a health care center for physical examination. After 3 years, 160 persons were still participating, 35 of whom attended the HL. The results show that persons who participated in the HL exercised more regularly, smoked less and had a denser network as well as more social support from nonfamily members than the comparison groups. This study contributes to increased knowledge among healthcare professionals, politicians and decision makers about peer support groups as a support strategy after a cardiac event.
PubMed ID
15572020 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up of sun behavior in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106960
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Luise Winkel Idorn
Pameli Datta
Jakob Heydenreich
Peter Alshede Philipsen
Hans Christian Wulf
Author Affiliation
Dermatological Research Department D92, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Melanoma - etiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - pathology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
IMPORTANCE UV radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary environmental risk factor for developing cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). OBJECTIVE To measure changes in sun behavior from the first until the third summer after the diagnosis of CMM using matched controls as a reference. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Three-year follow-up, observational, case-control study performed from May 7 to September 22, 2009, April 17 to September 15, 2010, and May 6 to July 31, 2011, at a university hospital in Denmark of 21 patients with CMM and 21 controls matched to patients by sex, age, occupation, and constitutive skin type participated in the study. Exposure to UVR was assessed the first and second summers (n=20) and the first and third summers (n=22) after diagnosis. Data from 40 participants were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Exposure to UVR was assessed by personal electronic UVR dosimeters that measured time-related UVR in standard erythema dose (SED) and corresponding sun diaries (mean, 74 days per participant each participation year). RESULTS Patients' daily UVR dose and UVR dose in connection with various behaviors increased during follow-up (quantified as an increase in daily UVR dose each year; all days: mean, 0.3 SED; 95% CI, 0.05-0.5 SED; days with body exposure: mean, 0.6 SED; 95% CI, 0.07-1.2 SED; holidays: mean, 1.2 SED; 95% CI, 0.3-2.1 SED; days abroad: 1.9 SED; 95% CI, 0.4-3.4 SED; and holidays with body exposure: mean, 2.3 SED; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4 SED). After the second year of follow-up, patients' UVR dose was higher than that of controls, who maintained a stable UVR dose. No difference was found between groups in the number of days with body exposure or the number of days using sunscreen in the second and third years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings suggest that patients with CMM do not maintain a cautious sun behavior in connection with an increase in UVR exposure, especially on days with body exposure, when abroad, and on holidays.
PubMed ID
24080851 View in PubMed
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5-alpha-reductase 2 polymorphisms as risk factors in prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19112
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Söderström T
Wadelius M
Andersson S-O
Johansson J-E
Johansson S
Granath F
Rane A
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. torbjorn.soderstrom@lmk.ck.lul.se
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 2002 Jun;12(4):307-12
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Cell Differentiation
DNA - blood - metabolism
DNA Primers - chemistry
European Continental Ancestry Group
Genotype
Heterozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostate-Specific Antigen - metabolism
Prostatic Neoplasms - enzymology - etiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone 5-alpha-Reductase - genetics
Abstract
Prostate cancer is a significant cause of death in Western countries and is under the strong influence of androgens. The steroid 5alpha-reductase 2 catalyzes the metabolism of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone in the prostate gland. The enzyme is a target in pharmacological treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia using specific inhibitors such as finasteride. Makridakis et al. have characterized the V89L and A49T polymorphisms in recombinant expression systems. The L allelic variant has a lower Vmax/Km ratio than the V variant. In the A49T polymorphism, the T variant has an increased Vmax/Km ratio. We performed a population-based case-control study of the impact of the SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms on the risk of prostate cancer. We also studied the relation between the genotypes and age at diagnosis, tumor, node, metastasis stage, differentiation grade, prostate specific antigen and heredity. The study included 175 prostate cancer patients and 159 healthy controls that were matched for age. There was an association with SRD5A2 V89L LL genotype and metastases at the time of diagnosis, OR 5.67 (95% CI 1.44-22.30) when adjusted for age, differentiation grade, T-stage and prostate specific antigen. Heterozygous prostate cancer cases that carried the SRD5A2 A49T AT genotype were significantly younger than cases that carried the AA genotype, (mean age 66 years vs 71, P = 0.038). The SRD5A2 V89L and A49T polymorphisms were, however, not associated with altered prostate cancer risk. Further studies of the V89L polymorphism may lead to better understanding of the etiology of prostate cancer metastases.
PubMed ID
12042668 View in PubMed
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The 5alpha-reductase type II A49T and V89L high-activity allelic variants are more common in men with prostate cancer compared with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173682
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Yvonne L Giwercman
Per-Anders Abrahamsson
Aleksander Giwercman
Virgil Gadaleanu
Göran Ahlgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Wallenberg Laboratory, entrance 46, SE - 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. yvonne.giwercman@kir.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3-Oxo-5-alpha-Steroid 4-Dehydrogenase - blood - genetics
Aged
Alanine
Alleles
Arginine
Case-Control Studies
Dihydrotestosterone - blood
Disease Progression
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutamine
Humans
Leucine
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostatic Hyperplasia - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Receptors, Androgen - blood - genetics
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Repeat Sequences
Testosterone - blood
Threonine
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Valine
Abstract
To compare men with prostate disease with those from the general population regarding polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene and in the 5alpha-reductase II (SRD5A2) gene.
The SRD5A2 polymorphisms A49T, V89L and R227Q, the androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeats and sex hormone status was investigated in men with prostate cancer (CaP) (n=89), benign prostate hyperplasia (n=45) and healthy military conscripts (n=223).
The SRD5A2 high-activity allele variants A49T AT and V89L LL were more frequent in CaP-patients compared to general population, p=0.026 and p=0.05, respectively. CaP progression was, however, independent of SRD5A2 variants. In contrary, men with GGN
PubMed ID
16039774 View in PubMed
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5-oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid induces the infiltration of granulocytes into human skin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15223
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Oct;112(4):768-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Shigeo Muro
Qutayba Hamid
Ronald Olivenstein
Rame Taha
Joshua Rokach
William S Powell
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Oct;112(4):768-74
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arachidonic Acids - pharmacology
Asthma - physiopathology
Case-Control Studies
Cell Movement - drug effects
Chemotactic Factors - pharmacology
Granulocytes - drug effects - pathology
Humans
Macrophages - pathology
Mast Cells - pathology
Neutrophils - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Skin - pathology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: 5-Oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE) is an arachidonic acid metabolite with potent in vitro chemoattractant effects on eosinophils and neutrophils. It has also been shown to induce pulmonary eosinophilia in Brown Norway rats, but it is not known whether it is active in human beings in vivo. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether 5-oxo-ETE can induce cellular infiltration in patients with atopic asthma and nonatopic control subjects after intradermal administration. METHODS: 5-Oxo-ETE was administered intradermally to 11 patients with atopic asthma and 10 nonatopic control subjects. Skin biopsy specimens were taken 6 or 24 hours later and examined by immunocytochemistry for cells expressing specific markers for eosinophils (major basic protein), neutrophils (elastase), macrophages (CD68), lymphocytes (CD3), and mast cells (tryptase). RESULTS: 5-Oxo-ETE (1.5 and 5 microg) elicited the infiltration of both eosinophils and neutrophils into the skin in both control and atopic asthmatic subjects. Increased numbers of eosinophils were observed at 6 and 24 hours after injection, whereas significantly elevated neutrophil numbers were present only after 24 hours. Eosinophils were >3 times higher in patients with atopic asthma compared with control subjects after injection of the highest dose of 5-oxo-ETE. Macrophage numbers were also elevated, but only at the highest dose of 5-oxo-ETE. No effects were observed on the numbers of either lymphocytes or mast cells. CONCLUSIONS: 5-Oxo-ETE elicits the infiltration of eosinophils and neutrophils into the skin of human beings in vivo after intradermal administration. Asthmatic subjects are more responsive to this substance than nonallergic control subjects. These results suggest that 5-oxo-ETE may be an important mediator of inflammation.
PubMed ID
14564360 View in PubMed
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A 6-year exercise program improves skeletal traits without affecting fracture risk: a prospective controlled study in 2621 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259943
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Jun;29(6):1325-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Fredrik Detter
Björn E Rosengren
Magnus Dencker
Mattias Lorentzon
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Magnus K Karlsson
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Jun;29(6):1325-36
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Accelerometry
Bone Density
Bone and Bones - pathology - physiopathology - radiography
Case-Control Studies
Child
Exercise - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Motor Activity
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Most pediatric exercise intervention studies that evaluate the effect on skeletal traits include volunteers and follow bone mass for less than 3 years. We present a population-based 6-year controlled exercise intervention study in children with bone structure and incident fractures as endpoints. Fractures were registered in 417 girls and 500 boys in the intervention group (3969 person-years) and 835 girls and 869 boys in the control group (8245 person-years), all aged 6 to 9 years at study start, during the 6-year study period. Children in the intervention group had 40 minutes daily school physical education (PE) and the control group 60 minutes per week. In a subcohort with 78 girls and 111 boys in the intervention group and 52 girls and 54 boys in the control group, bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm(2) ) and bone area (mm(2) ) were measured repeatedly by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) measured bone mass and bone structure at follow-up. There were 21.7 low and moderate energy-related fractures per 1000 person-years in the intervention group and 19.3 fractures in the control group, leading to a rate ratio (RR) of 1.12 (0.85, 1.46). Girls in the intervention group, compared with girls in the control group, had 0.009?g/cm(2) (0.003, 0.015) larger gain annually in spine BMD, 0.07?g (0.014, 0.123) larger gain in femoral neck bone mineral content (BMC), and 4.1?mm(2) (0.5, 7.8) larger gain in femoral neck area, and at follow-up 24.1?g (7.6, 40.6) higher tibial cortical BMC (g) and 23.9?mm(2) (5.27, 42.6) larger tibial cross-sectional area. Boys with daily PE had 0.006?g/cm(2) (0.002, 0.010) larger gain annually in spine BMD than control boys but at follow-up no higher pQCT values than boys in the control group. Daily PE for 6 years in at study start 6- to 9-year-olds improves bone mass and bone size in girls and bone mass in boys, without affecting the fracture risk.
Notes
Comment In: J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Jun;29(6):1322-424764102
PubMed ID
24390777 View in PubMed
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A 6-year follow-up study of 122 patients attending a multiprofessional rehabilitation programme for persistent musculoskeletal-related pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78830
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2007 Mar;30(1):9-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Norrefalk Jan-Rickard
Linder Jürgen
Ekholm Jan
Borg Kristian
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. norrefalk@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2007 Mar;30(1):9-18
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Age Factors
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - rehabilitation
Pain - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Sick Leave
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the outcome 6 years after completing a multiprofessional 8-week rehabilitation programme regarding the following objectives: (1) return to work, (2) level of activity and (3) pain intensity. Of 149 patients attending a rehabilitation programme, 122 were followed up after 6 years, through a structured telephone interview, and their present work situation, level of activity, sleeping habits, their estimated pain intensity and consumption of analgesics were recorded. The questions presented were the same as they had answered before entering the programme. The return-to-work rate was compared to 79 patients in a control group. At the 6-year follow-up, compared to before entering the programme, 52% had returned to work (P
PubMed ID
17293715 View in PubMed
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10-year survival and quality of life in patients with high-risk pN0 prostate cancer following definitive radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94068
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Berg Arne
Lilleby Wolfgang
Bruland Oyvind Sverre
Fosså Sophie Dorothea
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. arne.berg@radiumhospitalet.no
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Disease Progression
Erectile Dysfunction - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Survival Analysis
Urination Disorders - physiopathology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following definitive radiotherapy (RT) given to T(1-4p)N(0)M(0) prostate cancer patients provided by a single institution between 1989 and 1996. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We assessed outcome among 203 patients who had completed three-dimensional conformal RT (66 Gy) without hormone treatment and in whom staging by lymphadenectomy had been performed. OS was compared with an age-matched control group from the general population. A cross-sectional, self-report survey of HRQoL was performed among surviving patients. RESULTS: Median observation time was 10 years (range, 1-16 years). Eighty-one percent had high-risk tumors defined as T(3-4) or Gleason score (GS) > or =7B (4+3). Among these, 10-year OS, CSS, and cPFS rates were 52%, 66%, and 39%, respectively. The corresponding fractions in low-risk patients (T(1-2) and GS or =7B.
PubMed ID
17703896 View in PubMed
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11-year follow-up of mortality in patients with schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study (FIN11 study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149701
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2009
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Leo Niskanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. jari.tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Date
Aug-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Clozapine - adverse effects
Dibenzothiazepines - adverse effects
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Perphenazine - adverse effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
The introduction of second-generation antipsychotic drugs during the 1990s is widely believed to have adversely affected mortality of patients with schizophrenia. Our aim was to establish the long-term contribution of antipsychotic drugs to mortality in such patients.
Nationwide registers in Finland were used to compare the cause-specific mortality in 66 881 patients versus the total population (5.2 million) between 1996, and 2006, and to link these data with the use of antipsychotic drugs. We measured the all-cause mortality of patients with schizophrenia in outpatient care during current and cumulative exposure to any antipsychotic drug versus no use of these drugs, and exposure to the six most frequently used antipsychotic drugs compared with perphenazine use.
Although the proportional use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs rose from 13% to 64% during follow-up, the gap in life expectancy between patients with schizophrenia and the general population did not widen between 1996 (25 years), and 2006 (22.5 years). Compared with current use of perphenazine, the highest risk for overall mortality was recorded for quetiapine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.82), and the lowest risk for clozapine (0.74, 0.60-0.91; p=0.0045 for the difference between clozapine vs perphenazine, and p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897117
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897118
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):590-219595448
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897121
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897120
PubMed ID
19595447 View in PubMed
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A 13-year report on childhood sinusitis: clinical presentations, predisposing factors and possible means of prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15834
Source
Rhinology. 1996 Sep;34(3):171-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
G. Henriksson
K M Westrin
J. Kumlien
P. Stierna
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Rhinology. 1996 Sep;34(3):171-5
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child
Child, Preschool
Ethmoid Sinusitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Nasal Polyps - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sinusitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Two hundred and nineteen children with sinusitis treated as in-patients at Huddinge University Hospital during the period 1980-1992 have been reviewed. Epidemiological data, the clinical picture, treatment and complications are described. The prevalence of significant predisposing conditions (such as upper airway allergy, asthma, and immunoglobulin deficiency) has been estimated. Serious sinusitis complications are few, surgery is only rarely required, and previously-recognized important predisposing paediatric conditions are not significantly more common than in the general juvenile population. Improved medication and prevention may have reduced the incidence of serious sinus infections in risk groups today. Children with cystic fibrosis have been reviewed with regard to the necessity of both sinus and nasal polyp surgery. Aggressive medical therapy appears to have reduced their need for sinus surgery as well as polypectomy.
PubMed ID
8938888 View in PubMed
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7855 records – page 1 of 786.