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Atypical femoral fractures are a separate entity, characterized by highly specific radiographic features. A comparison of 59 cases and 218 controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119464
Source
Bone. 2013 Jan;52(1):389-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Jörg Schilcher
Veronika Koeppen
Jonas Ranstam
Ralf Skripitz
Karl Michaëlsson
Per Aspenberg
Author Affiliation
Orthopedics, Department of clinical and experimental medicine, Faculty of health science, Linköping University, Sweden. jorg.schilcher@lio.se
Source
Bone. 2013 Jan;52(1):389-92
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Femoral Fractures - radiography
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
Estimations of the risk of bisphosphonate associated atypical femoral fractures vary between different population-based studies, from considerable to neglectable. A possible explanation for these discrepancies could be different definitions of atypical fractures. We aimed to identify specific radiographic fracture characteristics associated with bisphosphonate use.
In a previous nationwide study, 59 atypical and 218 ordinary fractures were diagnosed. The atypical fractures were defined by their stress-type fracture pattern. All fractures were now re-assessed by a physician in training, without information about bisphosphonate use. The fracture angle (0-180°) was measured. Presence of local lateral cortical thickening (a callus reaction), more than 2 fragments, or a medial spike was noted. The reader then made a judgment whether the fracture appeared as an atypical fracture based on the ASBMR criteria.
Frequency distribution analysis of the fracture angle showed a distinct subgroup, comprising 25% of all 277 fractures, with a mean of 89 and SD of 10°. Forty-two of 57 patients in this subgroup used bisphosphonates, whereas only 27 of 213 others did (specificity 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.96). Presence of a callus reaction had also a high specificity for bisphosphonate use (0.96; 95% CI 0.92-0.98). The ASBMR criteria had a lower specificity, increasing the number of atypical fractures without bisphosphonate use from 13 to 31. This led to a decrease in age-adjusted relative risk associated with bisphosphonate use from 47 (95% CI 26-87) to 19 (95% CI 12-29).
Stress fractures of the femoral shaft are a specific entity, which is easily diagnosed on radiographs and strongly related to bisphosphonate use. Differences in diagnostic criteria may partially explain the large differences in relative risk between different population-based studies.
PubMed ID
23098829 View in PubMed
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Tuberculosis and vitamin D In Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102650
Source
Page 83 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
more efficiently to TB infection. Methods: A case-control study was designed by identifying TB patients and controls from 13 districts in Greenland. 72 patients and 72 controls donated a blood sample and their serum con-centration of vitamin D was determined. Associations between vitamin D and TB
  1 document  
Author
Nielsen, N
Skifte, T
Koch, A
Andersson, M
Ladefoged, K
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen
National Board of Health in Greenland, Nuuk
Medical Department, Queen Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk
Source
Page 83 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Case-control study
Greenland
Serum concentrations
Tuberculosis
Vitamin D
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 2. Infectious Diseases and Sexual Health.
Documents
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New Vectorcardiographic non-planarity measure of T-wave loop improves separation between healthy subjects and myocardial infarction patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98647
Source
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2009;2009:1754-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mari Karsikas
Kai Noponen
Heikki Huikuri
Tapio Seppanen
Author Affiliation
Department Electrical and Information Engineering, Computer Engineering Laboratory PO BOX 4500, 90014 University of Oulu, Finland. mari.karsikas@ee.oulu.fi
Source
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2009;2009:1754-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Electrocardiography - methods
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - physiopathology
Abstract
Principal component analysis of vectorcardio-graphic T-wave loop has been shown to be a potential tool to describe the abnormality of the cardiac repolarization and to predict cardiac events in patients with cardiac disease. In this paper a new method for estimating the non-planarity of the T-wave loop is introduced and tested with healthy subjects and subjects with anterior or inferior myocardial infarction. The method is based on the resamping of T-wave data points with respect to the arc-length, the total least squares plane fitting, the identifying and reordering of the fitted axes, and decomposing the optimal rotation matrix. A recently published related measure, PCA3, was used for comparison purposes. The results showed that the non-planarity of T-wave loop increased significantly in patients with myocardial infarction compared to the healthy group. The new method separated healthy and patient groups with p-value 0.002 while PCA3 only with p-value 0.075. The new method was superior to PCA3 in separating the healthy patients from both infarction types.
PubMed ID
19963764 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a violence risk assessment system (the Alert System) for reducing violence in an acute hospital: a before and after study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138714
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 May;48(5):534-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Rakel N Kling
Annalee Yassi
Elizabeth Smailes
Chris Y Lovato
Mieke Koehoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, Room 201 - 2206 East Mall, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z3, Canada.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 May;48(5):534-9
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Hospitals
Humans
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Violence
Abstract
To investigate the effectiveness of a risk assessment system in reducing the risk of violence in an acute care hospital in the Canadian province of British Columbia.
Hospital violence incident rates (number of incidents/100,000 work hours) were calculated and compared pre, during and post implementation of the Alert System, a violence risk assessment system, at one acute care hospital. Poisson regression models were used to examine the effect of the Alert System on hospital-level violent incident rates. Multivariable, conditional logistic regression was used to examine the effect of the Alert System on the individual-level risk of violent incidence using a case-control study.
The violent incident rate decreased during the Alert System implementation period only, but subsequently returned to pre-implementation levels. In the case-control analyses, the Alert flag was associated with an increased risk for a patient violent incident (odds ratio=7.74, 95% CI=4.81-12.47).
Although useful at identifying violent patients, the Alert System even though offered in conjunction with violence prevention training, does not appear to provide the resources or procedures needed by healthcare workers to prevent a patient from progressing to a violent incident once flagged. Violence in healthcare should be studied and prevented using a multifaceted approach.
PubMed ID
21145550 View in PubMed
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CRY2 is associated with rapid cycling in bipolar disorder patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140634
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(9):e12632
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Louise K Sjöholm
Lena Backlund
Emarndeena Haji Cheteh
Inger Römer Ek
Louise Frisén
Martin Schalling
Urban Osby
Catharina Lavebratt
Pernilla Nikamo
Author Affiliation
Neurogenetics Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(9):e12632
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bipolar Disorder - genetics - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Cryptochromes - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
Bipolar disorder patients often display abnormalities in circadian rhythm, and they are sensitive to irregular diurnal rhythms. CRY2 participates in the core clock that generates circadian rhythms. CRY2 mRNA expression in blood mononuclear cells was recently shown to display a marked diurnal variation and to respond to total sleep deprivation in healthy human volunteers. It was also shown that bipolar patients in a depressive state had lower CRY2 mRNA levels, nonresponsive to total sleep deprivation, compared to healthy controls, and that CRY2 gene variation was associated with winter depression in both Swedish and Finnish cohorts.
Four CRY2 SNPs spanning from intron 2 to downstream 3'UTR were analyzed for association to bipolar disorder type 1 (n?=?497), bipolar disorder type 2 (n?=?60) and bipolar disorder with the feature rapid cycling (n?=?155) versus blood donors (n?=?1044) in Sweden. Also, the rapid cycling cases were compared with bipolar disorder cases without rapid cycling (n?=?422). The haplotype GGAC was underrepresented among rapid cycling cases versus controls and versus bipolar disorder cases without rapid cycling (OR?=?0.7, P?=?0.006-0.02), whereas overrepresentation among rapid cycling cases was seen for AAAC (OR?=?1.3-1.4, P?=?0.03-0.04) and AGGA (OR?=?1.5, P?=?0.05). The risk and protective CRY2 haplotypes and their effect sizes were similar to those recently suggested to be associated with winter depression in Swedes.
We propose that the circadian gene CRY2 is associated with rapid cycling in bipolar disorder. This is the first time a clock gene is implicated in rapid cycling, and one of few findings showing a molecular discrimination between rapid cycling and other forms of bipolar disorder.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20856823 View in PubMed
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Revisiting the issue of co-dependency in nursing: caring or caretaking?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186395
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2002 Dec;34(4):35-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Laurie Michelle Hopkins
Winston Jackson
Author Affiliation
Halifax Regional School Board, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2002 Dec;34(4):35-45
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Codependency (Psychology)
Empathy
Humans
Nova Scotia
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
It is purported in the literature that individuals who demonstrate co-dependent traits (consistently taking responsibility for others to the point of neglecting onself) enter the nursing profession to fulfill pathological needs and that nursing encourages co-dependent behaviour through its focus on "caring." This study was undertaken to determine whether nursing students have higher co-dependency scores than students in other programs. Data were collected through a questionnaire. A continuum-based Co-dependency Index was constructed with a Caring and Caretaking Sub-index to allow for more accurate measurement of co-dependency traits. In contrast to results reported in the literature, one-tailed testing indicated no significant relationship between co-dependency and university program. The results of this study suggest the need for a continuum approach to measuring co-dependency, to ensure that the presence of caring behaviours in measurement tools do not create a bias against nursing, a profession based on caring.
PubMed ID
12619476 View in PubMed
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Mobile phone use and acoustic neuromas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17081
Source
Epidemiology. 2005 May;16(3):415; author reply 417-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Lennart Hardell
Kjell Hansson Mild
Source
Epidemiology. 2005 May;16(3):415; author reply 417-8
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cellular Phone
Humans
Neuroma, Acoustic - etiology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Epidemiology. 2004 Nov;15(6):653-915475713
PubMed ID
15824564 View in PubMed
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The aetiology of schizophrenia: what have the Swedish Medical Registers taught us?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271146
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Oct;50(10):1471-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Sarah Harper
Helen Towers-Evans
James MacCabe
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Oct;50(10):1471-9
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - etiology
Sweden
Abstract
To review the last thirty years of studies that, using Swedish population registers, have added to our understanding of the aetiology of schizophrenia SAMPLE INCLUDED/METHODS: A literature search was performed to systematically review all studies that using Swedish Population based registers have investigated the aetiology of schizophrenia. Key authors in the field, predominately from Swedish institutions, were additionally contacted and key journals hand searched, for missing references. A quality assessment methodological review was then conducted on each study. Data was extracted and tabulated on identified aetiological themes
61 articles were included corresponding to 10 identified aetiological themes. Although the majority of included studies were retrospective cohort studies, case control studies were also included where they used population based registers. Confirming previous research, schizophrenia was found to have a multi-factorial aetiological basis with pregnancy and birth factors, parental age, social adversity, genetics, substance misuse, migration and ethnicity, personality, non-psychiatric co-morbidity, psychiatric history and poor cognitive performance all found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of later schizophrenia.
Although some difficulties exist in analysing the interplay between each of these factors, the Swedish population registers have added considerably to our understanding of each of the presented individual aetiological themes. The ability to study the whole population over several decades has been particularly useful in determining the timing of exposures.
PubMed ID
26088681 View in PubMed
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Occupation and breast cancer: a Canadian case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166415
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006 Sep;1076:765-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
James T Brophy
Margaret M Keith
Kevin M Gorey
Isaac Luginaah
Ethan Laukkanen
Deborah Hellyer
Abraham Reinhartz
Andrew Watterson
Hakam Abu-Zahra
Eleanor Maticka-Tyndale
Kenneth Schneider
Matthias Beck
Michael Gilbertson
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jbrophy@ohcow.on.ca
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006 Sep;1076:765-77
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupations
Abstract
A local collaborative process was launched in Windsor, Ontario, Canada to explore the role of occupation as a risk factor for cancer. An initial hypothesis-generating study found an increased risk for breast cancer among women aged 55 years or younger who had ever worked in farming. On the basis of this result, a 2-year case-control study was undertaken to evaluate the lifetime occupational histories of women with breast cancer. The results indicate that women with breast cancer were nearly three times more likely to have worked in agriculture when compared to the controls (OR = 2.80 [95% CI, 1.6-4.8]). The risk for those who worked in agriculture and subsequently worked in automotive-related manufacturing was further elevated (OR = 4.0 [95% CI, 1.7-9.9]). The risk for those employed in agriculture and subsequently employed in health care was also elevated (OR = 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.6]). Farming tended to be among the earlier jobs worked, often during adolescence. While this article has limitations including the small sample size and the lack of information regarding specific exposures, it does provide evidence of a possible association between farming and breast cancer. The findings indicate the need for further study to determine which aspects of farming may be of biological importance and to better understand the significance of timing of exposure in terms of cancer risk.
PubMed ID
17119253 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1993 Oct;72(7):560-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
M H Moen
P. Magnus
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Hospital, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1993 Oct;72(7):560-4
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Endometriosis - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
To study the occurrence of endometriosis or adenomyosis in mothers and sisters of patients with endometriosis.
A total of 563 patients with endometriosis were interviewed about endometriosis or adenomyosis in their mothers or sisters. Five hundred and twenty-eight patients (94%) gave information about their relatives. Six patients were adopted and had no knowledge about their relatives. Among 522 patients were seven pairs of sisters, of which only one was included, giving a total of 515 cases. The control group consisted of 149 women without endometriosis documented at a recently diagnostic laparoscopy performed in connection with sterilization. The controls were likewise interviewed about their relatives, and none refused to give information. If a gynecological operation in a relative was reported, medical records were obtained (68%) or a description of the medical history was given by the proband.
Endometriosis or adenomyosis was disclosed in 3.9% of mothers of cases and in 0.7% of mothers of controls, in 4.8% of sisters of cases and in 0.6% of sisters of controls. The relative risk of endometriosis in a first-degree relative (expressed as odds ratio), was 7.2 (95% confidence interval 2.1, 24.3). Severe manifestations of endometriosis were found more often among patients with a positive family history than among those without (26% versus 12%, p
PubMed ID
8213105 View in PubMed
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7796 records – page 1 of 780.