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"An arena for sharing": exploring the joint involvement of patients and their relatives in a cancer rehabilitation intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275109
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2015 Mar-Apr;38(2):E1-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karen la Cour
Loni Ledderer
Helle Ploug Hansen
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2015 Mar-Apr;38(2):E1-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - utilization
Curriculum - trends
Denmark
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - rehabilitation
Abstract
Despite an increasing focus on cancer rehabilitation programs, there is limited knowledge about the experiences of residential rehabilitation focusing on both the patients and their relatives.
The aim of this study was to explore the experienced benefits of the joint involvement of patients and their relatives in a 5-day residential cancer rehabilitation course, provided as part of a larger intervention study in Denmark.
Ethnographic fieldwork, consisting of participant observations and informal conversations, was conducted with 20 individuals (10 patients and 10 relatives). In-depth interviews were conducted in the participants' homes 1 month after the rehabilitation course. Data were analyzed by a constant comparative method.
Residential rehabilitation course was identified to serve as an "arena for sharing," underpinned by 3 dimensions of sharing: sharing cancer experiences, sharing strategies, and sharing mutual care.
Sharing in residential rehabilitation is experienced as useful for cancer patients and their relatives, to validate cancer-related strategies and strengthen mutual understanding within relationships.
The results can guide the development of cancer rehabilitation to involve patients and their relatives and provide opportunity for sharing and empowerment on individual as well as couple and group levels.
PubMed ID
24831040 View in PubMed
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Urban American Indian/Alaskan Natives compared to non-Indians in out-of-home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130969
Source
Child Welfare. 2011;90(1):43-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Vernon B Carter
Author Affiliation
University of New Hampshire, USA.
Source
Child Welfare. 2011;90(1):43-58
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Caregivers - utilization
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Foster Home Care - utilization
Group Homes - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Residential Facilities - utilization
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Historically, American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) children have been disproportionately represented in the foster care system. In this study, nationally representative child welfare data from October 1999 was used to compare urban AI/AN children to non-Indian children placed into out-of-home care. Compared to non-Indian children, urban AI/AN children were older, were more often male, came from poorer homes, and were more frequently placed into group homes/ residential placements. Urban AI/AN caregivers had a greater prevalence of alcohol abuse and mental health problems compared with non-Indian caregivers.
PubMed ID
21950174 View in PubMed
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