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Federal government tightens live-in caregiver regulations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134669
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):E539-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2011

CMAJ 2011 election survey: home/palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134811
Source
CMAJ. 2011 May 17;183(8):E459-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2011

Shared responsibility? Family caregivers and home care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121909
Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Jun;108(6):52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Laura M Funk
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Manitoba.
Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Jun;108(6):52
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Health Nursing - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Manitoba
Social Support
PubMed ID
22866574 View in PubMed
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The right of caregivers to access health information of relatives with mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129700
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2011 Nov-Dec;34(6):386-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
Billy Wing Yum Chan
Ann-Marie O'Brien
Author Affiliation
Law and Mental Health Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada M6J 1H4.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2011 Nov-Dec;34(6):386-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Caregivers - legislation & jurisprudence
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Deinstitutionalization
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing
Ontario
Abstract
This article reviews the legal, ethical and practical challenges of complying with the Ontario Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA) within the context of a Canadian mental health system that is overburdened and under resourced. The advent of deinstitutionalization has placed significantly increased responsibilities on the families of mentally ill individuals. While research evidences that involving family members in the care of their mentally ill relatives improves treatment outcomes, mental health practitioners constantly face the challenge of engaging family caregivers while also complying with privacy laws. The authors propose an Ontario Caregiver Recognition Act (OCRA) to formally recognize family caregivers as informal health information custodians based on the practice of other jurisdictions which incorporate the rights of family members actively engaged in providing care to their mentally ill relatives.
PubMed ID
22079086 View in PubMed
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Redefining parental identity: caregiving and schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186831
Source
Qual Health Res. 2003 Jan;13(1):100-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
P Jane Milliken
Herbert C Northcott
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, V8W 2Y2. jmillike@uvic.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2003 Jan;13(1):100-13
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children - psychology
British Columbia
Caregivers - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Decision Making
Deinstitutionalization - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Parenting
Parents - psychology
Patient Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self-Assessment
Social Responsibility
Abstract
When parents try to assume responsibility for an ill adult-child with schizophrenia, the law, mental health practitioners, and often the ill person reject their right to do so. Consequently, these parents regard themselves as disenfranchised, i.e., lacking the rights required to care properly for their loved ones. Redefining Parental Identity, a grounded theory of caregiving and schizophrenia, traces changes in a parent's identity and caregiving during the erratic course of the child's mental illness. Participants were a purposive sample of 29 parent caregivers from 19 families in British Columbia, Canada, caring for 20 adult children. This understanding of their experience will be helpful to parents of people with schizophrenia, professional practitioners, and those involved in mental health care reform.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Nurs. 2003 Oct;6(4):126-714577410
PubMed ID
12564265 View in PubMed
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Child care providers who commit sexual offences: a description of offender, offence, and victim characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162302
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2007 Aug;51(4):384-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Heather M Moulden
Philip Firestone
Audrey F Wexler
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol. 2007 Aug;51(4):384-406
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Caregivers - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Child Care - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Sex Offenses - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this investigation was to undertake an exploratory analysis of child care providers who sexually offend against children and adolescents and the circumstances related to these offences. Archival Violent Crime Linkage Analysis System (ViCLAS) reports were obtained from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), and demographic and criminal characteristics for the offender, as well as information about the victim and offence, were selected for analyses. A descriptive approach was used to analyze the qualitative reports for a group of 305 Canadian sexual offenders between 1995 and 2002. Adult male (N = 163) and female ( N = 14), along with juvenile male (N = 100) and female (N = 28) child care providers who were involved in a sexual offence against a child or adolescent are described. This article provides unique information about the crimes committed by child care providers in that it is focused on crime characteristics, rather than on personality or treatment variables. Furthermore, it represents a comprehensive examination of this type of offender by including understudied groups, namely juvenile and female offenders.
PubMed ID
17652144 View in PubMed
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Social rights and employment rights related to family care: family care regimes in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104665
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:66-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Patricia Frericks
Per H Jensen
Birgit Pfau-Effinger
Author Affiliation
Hamburg University, Allende-Platz 1, 20146 Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: patricia.frericks@uni-hamburg.de.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:66-77
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Civil Rights
Denmark
Employment - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Female
Frail Elderly
Germany
Home Care Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Male
Netherlands
Policy Making
Social Justice
Social Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
In early welfare states, social rights predominantly derived from formal employment relations. Within the past two decades, however, some European countries have opened these social institutions to care work also. Cash-for-care and social entitlements for periods of at-home family caregiving have changed the characteristics of informal care work that family members traditionally provide to older relatives. Formerly based on unpaid kinship relations, it has changed towards new paid and more formalized forms of care work by family members. But it can be assumed that long-term care work by family members is constructed differently across welfare states. The paper is guided by the following research question: How do welfare-state policies differ in the degree to which their policies towards family care for senior citizens create social risks for the caring family members? We use the conceptual framework of "family care regimes" as our analytical framework for the comparative research. To do this, we compare care policies towards older care-needy people in the welfare states of the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark. The findings show that a common feature in all three countries is that the situation of family carers is to some degree being formalized: in all three countries a frail senior citizen can chose a family member as the care provider, and the welfare states support the family care providers. Still, the legal situation as well as the quality and level of social rights for family caregivers differ considerably among the three countries. It is shown that the institutional framework for senior care by family members in Germany and the Netherlands represents a family care regime that supports semi-formal family care, and that in Denmark it can be classified as a family care regime that supports formal family care. We show that these different types of family care regimes differ considerably in the social risks they pose to family carers.
PubMed ID
24655674 View in PubMed
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Car accidents after ambulatory surgery in patients without an escort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158668
Source
Anesth Analg. 2008 Mar;106(3):817-20, table of contents
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Frances Chung
Nicole Assmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto McL 2-405, 399 Bathurst St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. frances.chung@uhn.on.ca
Source
Anesth Analg. 2008 Mar;106(3):817-20, table of contents
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Adult
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
Anesthesia Recovery Period
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Caregivers - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Liability, Legal
Male
Malpractice
Patient Discharge - legislation & jurisprudence
Postoperative Care
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Psychomotor Performance
Transportation of Patients - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Occasionally, ambulatory surgical patients present without an escort for their procedure. This creates a dilemma for caregivers, and allowing patients to drive may have an impact on their safety. The Canadian Medical Protective Association is a mutual defense organization for 95% of Canadian physicians. The national database is a unique and extensive repository of medico-legal data. We scanned this database for malpractice patients who were discharged after an ambulatory surgery procedure and allowed to drive home with a poor outcome. From this database, two malpractice cases of patients who were discharged without an escort after an ambulatory surgical procedure were reported. Both had a car accident and sustained serious injuries. Based on this we do not recommend discharge without an escort after general anesthesia, regional anesthesia, monitored anesthesia or sedation. Driving after ambulatory surgery cannot be considered safe and caregivers need to verify a safe ride home.
PubMed ID
18292425 View in PubMed
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Addressing elder abuse: the Waterloo restorative justice approach to elder abuse project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135616
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Apr;23(2):127-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arlene Groh
Rick Linden
Author Affiliation
Healing Approaches for Elder Abuse and Mistreatment, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Apr;23(2):127-46
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Cooperative Behavior
Elder Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - therapy
Health Services for the Aged - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence
Program Evaluation
Risk assessment
Social Support
Vulnerable Populations - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) of Waterloo Region, in partnership with a number of other social service agencies, designed and implemented a restorative justice model applicable to older adults who have been abused by an individual in a position of trust. The project was very successful in building partnerships, as many community agencies came together to deal with the problem of elder abuse. The program also raised the profile of elder abuse in the community. However, despite intensive efforts, referrals to the restorative justice program were quite low. Because of this, the program moved to a new organizational model, the Elder Abuse Response Team (EART), which has retained the guiding philosophy of restorative justice but has broadened the mandate. The team has evolved into a conflict management system that has multiple points of entry for cases and multiple options for dealing with elder abuse. The team has developed a broad range of community partners who can facilitate referrals to the EART and also can help to provide an individualized response to each case. The transition to the EART has been successful, and the number of referrals has increased significantly.
PubMed ID
21462047 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.