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251 records – page 1 of 26.

Academic careers in medical education: perceptions of the effects of a faculty development program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200453
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Oct;74(10 Suppl):S72-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999

Accounting for Irish Catholic ill health in Scotland: a qualitative exploration of some links between 'religion', class and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179028
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Patricia Walls
Rory Williams
Author Affiliation
MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow. WallsAMP@aol.com
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Catholicism - psychology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Ireland - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Prejudice
Protestantism - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Scotland - epidemiology
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options. The paper considers whether the competence of Catholics or Catholic cultural factors are implicated in thwarting social mobility among Catholics or, alternatively, whether institutional sectarianism is involved. We conclude that, of these options, theories of institutional sectarianism provide the hypothesis which currently best fits these data. In Glasgow, people of indigenous Irish descent are recognisable from their names and Catholic background and are identified as Catholic by others. Overt historical exclusion of Catholics from middle class employment options now seems to take unrecognised forms in routine assumptions and practices which restrict Catholic employment opportunities. It is argued that younger Catholics use education to overcome the obstacles to mobility faced by older people and circumvent exclusions by recourse to middle class public-sector employment. This paper aims to link historical, structural and sectarian patterns of employment experience to accounts of health and work, and in so doing to contribute to an explanation for the relatively poor health of Catholic Glaswegians with Irish roots.
PubMed ID
15283776 View in PubMed
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[Advance men, but .... Interview by Ragnar Urtegaard Thue.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52890
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Jun 7;78(10):9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-1990

Aligning career development with organizational goals: working towards the development of a strong and sustainable workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152039
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):56-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Marcy Saxe-Braithwaite
Sandra Carlton
Brenda Bass
Author Affiliation
Programs and Chief Nursing Officer, Providence Care, Kingston, ON, Canada. saxebram@providencecare.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):56-69
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Mobility
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Forecasting
Health Personnel - education - trends
Health Promotion - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Personnel Loyalty
Pilot Projects
Social Change
Staff Development - trends
Abstract
The rapidly changing world of healthcare is faced with many challenges, not the least of which is a diminishing workforce. Healthcare organizations must develop multiple strategies, not only to attract and retain employees, but also to ensure that workers are prepared for continuous change in the workplace, are working at their full scope of practice and are committed to, and accountable for, the provision of high-quality care. There is evidence that by creating a healthier workplace, improved patient care will follow. Aligning Healthy Workplace Initiatives with an organization's strategic goals, corporate culture and vision reinforces their importance within the organization. In this paper, we describe an innovative pilot to assess a career development program, one of multiple Healthy Workplace Initiatives taking place at Providence Care in Kingston, Ontario in support of our three strategic goals. The results of the pilot were very encouraging; subsequent success in obtaining funding from HealthForceOntario has allowed the implementation of a sustainable program of career development within the organization. More work is required to evaluate its long-term effectiveness.
PubMed ID
19289913 View in PubMed
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Anger-provoking events and intention to turnover in hospital administrators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143917
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2010;24(1):45-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Karen Harlos
Author Affiliation
Department of Business and Administration, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Canada. ka.harlos@uwinnipeg.ca
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2010;24(1):45-56
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anger
Canada
Career Mobility
Data Collection
Hospital Administrators - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Personnel Loyalty
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine anger associated with types of negative work events experienced by health administrators and to examine the impact of anger on intent to leave.
Textual data analysis is used to measure anger in open-ended survey responses from administrative staff of a Canadian hospital. Multivariate regression is applied to predict anger from event type, on the one hand, and turnover intentions from anger, on the other.
Person-related negative events contributed to administrator anger more than policy-related events. Anger from events predicted turnover intentions after adjusting for numerous potential confounds.
Future studies using larger samples across multiple sites are needed to test the generalizability of results.
Results provide useful information for retention strategies through codifying respect and fairness in interactions and policies. Health organizations stand to gain efficiencies by helping administrators handle anger effectively, leading to more stable staffing levels and more pleasurable, productive work environments.
This paper addresses gaps in knowledge about determinants of turnover in this population by examining the impact of administrator anger on intent to leave and the work events which give rise to anger. Given the strategic importance of health administration work and the high costs to health organizations when administrators leave, results hold particular promise for health human resources.
PubMed ID
20429408 View in PubMed
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The association between psychosocial work environment, attitudes towards older workers (ageism) and planned retirement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132314
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 May;85(4):437-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Sannie Thorsen
Reiner Rugulies
Katja Løngaard
Vilhelm Borg
Karsten Thielen
Jakob Bue Bjorner
Author Affiliation
The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø parkallé 105, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. svt@nrcwe.dk
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 May;85(4):437-45
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Ageism
Attitude
Career Mobility
Denmark
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Psychology
Questionnaires
Retirement - psychology
Work - psychology
Workload - psychology
Workplace
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the association between psychosocial factors (in particular ageism) at the workplace and older workers' retirement plans, while taking health and workability of the employee into account.
In the fall and winter of 2008, self-report data on work environment, health, workability and retirement plans were collected in a representative national sample (n = 3,122) of Danish employees 50 years or older. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyse associations in a cross-sectional design. Predictor variables were standardized.
In analyses adjusted for socio-demography, socio-economy, health, workability and work performance, 4 out of 6 examined psychosocial factors (ageism, lack of recognition, lack of development possibilities, lack of predictability) were significantly associated with plans of early retirement (OR: 1.10-1.13). Stratified on gender, three psychosocial factors (ageism, lack of recognition, lack of development possibilities) remained significant for men (OR: 1.15-1.25) and none for women. In particular was the association between retirement plans and ageism highly significant in the male subgroup, but no association was found in the female subgroup.
Ageism, lack of recognition and lack of development possibilities are associated with older male workers' retirement plans in our analyses. Workability has the strongest association with retirement plans for both genders.
PubMed ID
21830146 View in PubMed
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The association of distress and sleeping problems with physicians' intentions to change profession: the moderating effect of job control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147879
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2009 Oct;14(4):365-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Tarja Heponiemi
Anne Kouvonen
Jukka Vänskä
Hannu Halila
Timo Sinervo
Mika Kivimäki
Marko Elovainio
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tarja.heponiemi@thl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2009 Oct;14(4):365-73
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Mobility
Female
Finland
Humans
Intention
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Personnel Loyalty
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Sleep Disorders
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The present study examined whether job control moderated the association between stress indicators (distress and sleeping problems) and intentions to change profession among 2,650 Finnish physicians. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was applied. The authors found that high levels of distress and sleeping problems were associated with higher levels of intentions to change profession, whereas high job control was associated with lower levels of intentions to change profession even after adjusting for the effects of gender, age, and employment sector. In addition, high job control was able to mitigate the positive association that distress and sleeping problems had with intentions to change profession. Our findings highlight the importance of offering more job control to physicians to prevent unnecessary physician turnover.
PubMed ID
19839657 View in PubMed
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Becoming a doctor--was it the wrong career choice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204188
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Nov;47(9):1383-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
H. Hyppölä
E. Kumpusalo
L. Neittaanmäki
K. Mattila
I. Virjo
S. Kujala
R. Luhtala
H. Halila
M. Isokoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Nov;47(9):1383-7
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altruism
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Female
Finland
Humanism
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the social background of physicians, the reasons that influenced doctors to enter medicine, and the association between those reasons and satisfaction in career choice of young Finnish doctors. An extensive postal questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 2632 young Finnish doctors in 1988 and to 2332 doctors in 1993. We found out that majority of the respondents reported that interest in people, a wide range of job opportunities, the fact that medicine is a highly-appreciated profession, and success at school had influenced their decision to enter medicine quite a lot or very much. In 1988, 8% and in 1993, 7% of the respondents reported that interest in people had not influenced their career choice at all or only slightly. More women than men were influenced quite a lot or very much by factors like interest in people, success at school and vocation, meaning the lifelong calling to physicians' profession. A total of 22% of respondents would not enter medicine again. Vocation, interest in people and wide range of job opportunities were significantly more rarely mentioned as an important career choice motive by these respondents. It seems that interest in human beings and vocation are important to would-be doctors, and also help them to get along in the physicians' profession. Medical schools should develop their curricula towards more humanistic medicine in order to maintain their students' interest in people.
PubMed ID
9783881 View in PubMed
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251 records – page 1 of 26.