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609 records – page 1 of 61.

25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154080
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
J E Scott
J. de Vries
A M Iacopino
Author Affiliation
Oral Biology, University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aptitude Tests
Career Choice
Cohort Studies
Curriculum
Decision Making
Dental Research - education - trends
Education, Dental - trends
Education, Dental, Graduate - trends
Educational Measurement
Evidence-Based Dentistry - education
Faculty, Dental
Humans
Manitoba
Program Development
Schools, Dental - trends
Students, Dental
Abstract
Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.
PubMed ID
19029073 View in PubMed
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2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174812
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2005
Author
Don Yee
Alysa Fairchild
Mira Keyes
Jim Butler
George Dundas
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Date
Jun-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Radiation Oncology - education
Abstract
Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences.
Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey.
Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns.
Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.
PubMed ID
15890597 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Surg. 2013 Jun;56(3):149
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Edward J Harvey
Source
Can J Surg. 2013 Jun;56(3):149
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Choice
Female
General Surgery
Humans
Personnel Selection
Sex Factors
Notes
Cites: Can J Surg. 2013 Jun;56(3):153-823484466
Cites: Br Med J. 1969 Jun 21;2(5659):752-45786765
PubMed ID
23706843 View in PubMed
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Academic careers in medical education: perceptions of the effects of a faculty development program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200453
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Oct;74(10 Suppl):S72-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999

Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165658
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Bruce Prince
David M Andrus
Kevin Gwinner
Author Affiliation
College of Business Administration, Kansas State University, Calvin 101, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Canada
Career Choice
Consumer Product Safety
Delphi Technique
Education, Veterinary - manpower - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Schools, Veterinary - manpower - trends
United States
Veterinary Medicine - manpower - trends
Abstract
The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.
PubMed ID
17220489 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Nurse. 1992 Nov;88(10):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
P A Pelletier
C. Brassard
S. Caty
D. Adam
Source
Can Nurse. 1992 Nov;88(10):37-40
Date
Nov-1992
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Career Choice
Humans
Nursing - standards
Ontario
Questionnaires
Students - psychology
Abstract
A research study was conducted in a francophone high school in Northern Ontario to examine students' perceptions of nursing and the influence of these perceptions on nursing as a career choice. All students in grades 11, 12 and 13 were invited to participate. Fifty-eight percent (n = 268) completed the questionnaire. Results showed that 37 percent of the respondents considered pursuing a career in the health sciences. Only 14% percent were interested in nursing. Respondents' comments suggest that the nurse is viewed favorably but the profession is perceived as a career that does not involve pleasant tasks, good working conditions or opportunities for professional advancement. Reasons advocated for choosing nursing were altruistic rather than career-oriented. Students saw nursing practice as occurring mainly in a hospital setting. Half of the respondents who had chosen nursing as a career opted to enroll in a university program and the other half chose a college program. Results suggest that nursing continues to face an image problem regarding its role in the health care system. In these times of job losses and budget cuts, the profession still needs to attract young recruits. This is the challenge we have to face.
PubMed ID
1490271 View in PubMed
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Accounting for Irish Catholic ill health in Scotland: a qualitative exploration of some links between 'religion', class and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179028
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Patricia Walls
Rory Williams
Author Affiliation
MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow. WallsAMP@aol.com
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Catholicism - psychology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Ireland - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Prejudice
Protestantism - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Scotland - epidemiology
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options. The paper considers whether the competence of Catholics or Catholic cultural factors are implicated in thwarting social mobility among Catholics or, alternatively, whether institutional sectarianism is involved. We conclude that, of these options, theories of institutional sectarianism provide the hypothesis which currently best fits these data. In Glasgow, people of indigenous Irish descent are recognisable from their names and Catholic background and are identified as Catholic by others. Overt historical exclusion of Catholics from middle class employment options now seems to take unrecognised forms in routine assumptions and practices which restrict Catholic employment opportunities. It is argued that younger Catholics use education to overcome the obstacles to mobility faced by older people and circumvent exclusions by recourse to middle class public-sector employment. This paper aims to link historical, structural and sectarian patterns of employment experience to accounts of health and work, and in so doing to contribute to an explanation for the relatively poor health of Catholic Glaswegians with Irish roots.
PubMed ID
15283776 View in PubMed
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Admission criteria and diversity in medical school.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113996
Source
Med Educ. 2013 Jun;47(6):557-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Lotte O'Neill
Maria C Vonsild
Birgitta Wallstedt
Tim Dornan
Author Affiliation
Centre of Medical Education, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. lotte@medu.au.dk
Source
Med Educ. 2013 Jun;47(6):557-61
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Diversity
Denmark
Education, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Parents - education
Prospective Studies
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Underachievement
Young Adult
Abstract
The under-representation in medical education of students from lower socio-economic backgrounds is an important social issue. There is currently little evidence about whether changes in admission strategies might increase the diversity of the medical student population. Denmark introduced an 'attribute-based' admission track to make it easier for students who may not be eligible for admission on the 'grade-based' track to be admitted on the basis of attributes other than academic performance. The aim of this research was to examine whether there were significant differences in the social composition of student cohorts admitted via each of the two tracks during the years 2002-2007.
This prospective cohort study included 1074 medical students admitted during 2002-2007 to the University of Southern Denmark medical school. Of these, 454 were admitted by grade-based selection and 620 were selected on attributes other than grades. To explore the social mix of candidates admitted on each of the two tracks, respectively, we obtained information on social indices associated with educational attainment in Denmark (ethnic origin, father's education, mother's education, parenthood, parents living together, parent in receipt of social benefits).
Selection strategy (grade-based or attribute-based) had no statistically significant effect on the social diversity of the medical student population.
The choice of admission criteria may not be very important to widening access and increasing social diversity in medical schools. Attracting a sufficiently diverse applicant pool may represent a better strategy for increasing diversity in the student population.
Notes
Comment In: Med Educ. 2013 Jun;47(6):542-423662869
PubMed ID
23662872 View in PubMed
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609 records – page 1 of 61.