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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
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[A spectral analysis of the cardiac rhythm in children with cardiovascular diseases living in areas under radiation control]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34202
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1997 Jul-Aug;(4):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Poberskaia
N P Drinevskii
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1997 Jul-Aug;(4):16-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Electrocardiography - methods - radiation effects
English Abstract
Health Resorts
Heart Rate - radiation effects
Humans
Hyperplasia - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Power Plants
Radioactive Pollutants - adverse effects
Thyroid Gland - pathology
Ukraine
Abstract
Spectral analysis of cardiac rhythm has determined characteristics of humoral, sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation in children with cardiac abnormalities and thyroid hyperplasia. The examinees demonstrated low activity of humoral immunity, high sympathetic influences, slight variability of frequency-amplitude characteristics. Sanatorium treatment improved regulation of cardiac activity. Spectral analysis of cardiac rhythm proved efficient for optimization of physiotherapy.
PubMed ID
9424822 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Am J Med. 2001 Feb 1;110(2):118-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2001
Author
M L Hannuksela
S. Ellahham
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Biocenter Oulu (MLH), University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Med. 2001 Feb 1;110(2):118-26
Date
Feb-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Cardiovascular physiology
Child
Female
Hormones - blood
Humans
Lung - physiology
Male
Rheumatic Diseases - physiopathology
Skin Physiology
Steam Bath - adverse effects - standards
Abstract
Although sauna bathing causes various acute, transient cardiovascular and hormonal changes, it is well tolerated by most healthy adults and children. Sauna bathing does not influence fertility and is safe during the uncomplicated pregnancies of healthy women. Some studies have suggested that long-term sauna bathing may help lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension and improve the left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with chronic congestive heart failure, but additional data are needed to confirm these findings. The transient improvements in pulmonary function that occur in the sauna may provide some relief to patients with asthma and chronic bronchitis. Sauna bathing may also alleviate pain and improve joint mobility in patients with rheumatic disease. Although sauna bathing does not cause drying of the skin-and may even benefit patients with psoriasis-sweating may increase itching in patients with atopic dermatitis. Contraindications to sauna bathing include unstable angina pectoris, recent myocardial infarction, and severe aortic stenosis. Sauna bathing is safe, however, for most people with coronary heart disease with stable angina pectoris or old myocardial infarction. Very few acute myocardial infarctions and sudden deaths occur in saunas, but alcohol consumption during sauna bathing increases the risk of hypotension, arrhythmia, and sudden death, and should be avoided.
PubMed ID
11165553 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular fitness in early adulthood and future suicidal behaviour in men followed for up to 42 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257666
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Mar;44(4):779-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
M A I Åberg
J. Nyberg
K. Torén
A. Sörberg
H G Kuhn
M. Waern
Author Affiliation
Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Mar;44(4):779-88
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology - prevention & control
Depression - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Intelligence - physiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness - physiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cardiovascular fitness influences many aspects of brain function. However, the relationship between cardiovascular fitness and suicidal behaviour is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether cardiovascular fitness at age 18 years is associated with future risk of suicide attempt/death.
We performed a population-based Swedish longitudinal cohort study of male conscripts with no previous or ongoing mental illness (n = 1,136,527). The conscription examination, which took place during 1968-2005, included the cycle ergonometric test and tests of cognitive performance. Future risk of suicide attempt/death over a 5- to 42-year follow-up period was calculated with Cox proportional hazards models controlling for several confounders including familial factors.
At least one suicide attempt was recorded for 12,563 men. Death by suicide without a prior attempt was recorded in 4814 additional individuals. In fully adjusted models low cardiovascular fitness was associated with increased risk for future attempt/death by suicide [hazard ratio (HR) 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.64-1.94]. The HR changed only marginally after exclusion of persons who received in-patient care for depression (HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.61-1.94). Poor performance on both the cardiovascular fitness and cognitive tests was associated with a fivefold increased risk of suicide attempt or suicide death (HR 5.46, 95% CI 4.78-6.24).
Lower cardiovascular fitness at age 18 years was, after adjustment for a number of potential confounders, associated with an increased risk of attempt/death by suicide in adulthood. It remains to be clarified whether interventions designed to improve fitness in teens can influence the risk of suicidal behaviour later in life.
PubMed ID
23739044 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk reduction via telehealth: a feasibility study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159238
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jan;24(1):57-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Anne M PausJenssen
Betty Anne Spooner
Merne P Wilson
Thomas W Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medcine and the Cardiology Risk Factor Reduction Unit, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. anne.pausjenssen@saskatoonhealthregion.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jan;24(1):57-60
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Feasibility Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Ambulatory
Patient satisfaction
Risk factors
Saskatchewan
Severity of Illness Index
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Successful cardiovascular risk reduction (CVRR) requires ongoing care, which can be difficult for patients living outside urban areas. The authors tested the feasibility of CVRR using telehealth.
Telehealth care (T group, n=9) was offered at three- to six-month intervals to patients referred from La Ronge, Saskatchewan (385 km northeast of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan). All patients who were referred to the project accepted. For the initial visit, the clinic travelled to La Ronge; all other visits were performed using telehealth (CommunityNet). Body measurements, blood pressure readings, fasting laboratory tests and food and exercise logs were completed in La Ronge. During the telehealth session, patients met with a nurse, a dietician, a fitness consultant and a physician. Changes in medication were faxed or telephoned to the local pharmacy. The T group's outcomes were compared with a control group (C group, n=15), which was offered usual care from La Ronge and had been referred to the clinic previously. Change in Framingham risk score, as well as patient and provider satisfaction, was assessed.
The groups were similar in age (T: 44.3+/-12.8 years, C: 48.3+/-14.3 years) and initial Framingham risk score (T: 12.0+/-13.0%, C: 11.1+/-10.0%). All nine T group patients completed two or more visits, while only eight of 15 patients the C group did so. Both groups achieved a small reduction in Framingham risk score (T: -1.9+/-5.0%, C: -2.0+/-6.1%). Those with the highest initial Framingham risk scores tended to show the greatest reduction. The T group's patient and health care provider comments were generally positive.
CVRR via telehealth is feasible and compares favourably with usual care. In particular, more complete follow-up occurs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18209771 View in PubMed
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[Central hemodynamics in children with vegetative vascular disfunction and rheumocarditis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31031
Source
Lik Sprava. 2002;(8):56-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
V V Berezhnyi
V H Kozachuk
T V Marushko
I B Orliuk
Source
Lik Sprava. 2002;(8):56-8
Date
2002
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Autonomic Nervous System - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
English Abstract
Exercise - physiology
Hemodynamic Processes - physiology
Humans
Myocardial Contraction - physiology
Rheumatic Heart Disease - physiopathology
Abstract
As many as 180 children with the vegeto-vascular dysfunction were studied for the functional condition of the myocardium. The findings secured suggested an imbalance in the vegetative nervous system. No changes were detected in the contractile capability of the myocardium. Those patients having had chronic foci of infection displayed inadequate tolerance to physical loads.
PubMed ID
12669543 View in PubMed
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The changing profile of the cardiovascular patient and the future of cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention: British Columbia as an example.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130399
Source
Kardiol Pol. 2011;69(10):1099-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011

[Clinical audiological parallels between the state of the hearing analyzer and the functional disorders of the nervous and cardiovascular systems in those working under noisy conditions with different parameters].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251174
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1976 Apr;(4):21-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1976

Early socioeconomic status is associated with adult nighttime blood pressure dipping.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158941
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Apr;70(3):276-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tavis S Campbell
Brenda L Key
Alana D Ireland
Simon L Bacon
Blaine Ditto
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4. t.s.campbell@ucalgary.ca
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Apr;70(3):276-81
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Arousal - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology - psychology
Child
Child Rearing
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Psychophysiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - physiopathology
Abstract
To examine the prognostic significance of early socioeconomic status (SES) on 24-hour blood pressure (BP) during early adulthood. Low SES has been related to poor health outcomes, in particular, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent cross-sectional research has also linked low levels of SES with several cardiovascular risk factors including poor nighttime BP dipping.
A total of 174 undergraduate university students whose childhood SES was assessed by highest level of education completed by their parents underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring.
Initial correlation analyses revealed positive associations between childhood SES and BP dipping, indicating that lower levels of childhood SES were associated with less systolic BP (SBP) (r = .29, p
PubMed ID
18256336 View in PubMed
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Effective population-wide public health interventions to promote sodium reduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148570
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Oct 27;181(9):605-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-2009
Author
Sailesh Mohan
Norm R C Campbell
Kevin Willis
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, and the Libin Cardiovascular Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Oct 27;181(9):605-9
Date
Oct-27-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology - prevention & control
Consumer Product Safety
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Food Labeling
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - physiopathology - prevention & control
Intervention Studies
Male
Ontario
Policy Making
Public Health - methods
Sodium, Dietary - adverse effects
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2010 Jan 12;182(1):63-420064960
PubMed ID
19752102 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.