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[20-year experience with the North Karelia Project. Preventive activities yield results].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219246
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(2):54-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
P. Puska
E. Vartiainen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Nissinen
Author Affiliation
Avd för epidemiologi och hälsofrämjande, Folkhälsoinstitutet, Helsingfors.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(2):54-5
Date
1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
PubMed ID
8121789 View in PubMed
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40-Year CHD Mortality Trends and the Role of Risk Factors in Mortality Decline: The North Karelia Project Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289324
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
06-2016
Author
Pekka Jousilahti
Tiina Laatikainen
Veikko Salomaa
Arto Pietilä
Erkki Vartiainen
Pekka Puska
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Health, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: pekka.jousilahti@thl.fi.
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Public Health
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
In the 1960s and early 1970s, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in Finland was the highest in the world, and within Finland, mortality was particularly high in the eastern part of the country. The North Karelia Project, the first large community-based cardiovascular diseases prevention program was established in 1972 to reduce the extremely high CHD mortality through behavioral change and reduction of the main cardiovascular disease risk factors among the whole population of North Karelia, the easternmost province of Finland. During the 40-year period from 1972 to 2012, smoking prevalence, serum total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure declined markedly, except a small increase in serum cholesterol levels between 2007 and 2012. From the early 1970s to 2012, CHD mortality decreased by 82% (from 643 to 118 per 100,000) among working-age (35 to 64 years) men. Among working-age women, the decline was 84% (from 114 to 17 per 100,000). During the first 10 years, changes in these 3 target risk factors explained nearly all of the observed mortality reduction. Since the mid-1980s, the observed reduction in mortality has been larger than the predicted reduction. In the early 1970s, premature CHD mortality (35 to 74 years) was about 37% higher among Eastern Finnish men and 23% higher among Eastern Finnish women, compared with men and women in Southwestern Finland. During the last 40 years, premature CHD mortality declined markedly in both areas, but the decline was larger in Eastern Finland and the mortality gap between the two areas nearly disappeared.
PubMed ID
27242088 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of death certificates of cardiovascular disease in a community intervention in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107744
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):883-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Anders Eriksson
Hans Stenlund
Kristin Ahlm
Kurt Boman
Lars Olov Bygren
Lars Age Johansson
Bert-Ove Olofsson
Stig Wall
Lars Weinehall
Author Affiliation
1Research Unit Skellefteå, Internal Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):883-9
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the possibility to evaluate the mortality pattern in a community intervention programme against cardiovascular disease by official death certificates.
For all deceased in the intervention area (Norsjö), the accuracy of the official death certificates were compared with matched controls in the rest of Västerbotten. The official causes of death were compared with new certificates, based on the last clinical record, issued by three of the authors, and coded by one of the authors, all four accordingly blinded.
The degree of agreement between the official underlying causes of death in "cardiovascular disease" (CVD) and the re-evaluated certificates was not found to differ between Norsjö and the rest of Västerbotten. The agreement was 87% and 88% at chapter level, respectively, but only 55% and 55% at 4-digit level, respectively. The reclassification resulted in a 1% decrease of "cardiovascular deaths" in both Norsjö and the rest of Västerbotten.
The disagreements in the reclassification of cause of death were equal but large in both directions. The official death certificates should be used with caution to evaluate CVD in small community intervention programmes, and restricted to the chapter level and total populations.
PubMed ID
23982462 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and mortality from all causes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9376
Source
Biol Res. 2004;37(2):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Serge Renaud
Dominique Lanzmann-Petithory
René Gueguen
Pascale Conard
Author Affiliation
Emile Roux Hospital, Public Assistance of Paris Hospitals France. serge.renaud@erx.ap-hop-paris.fr
Source
Biol Res. 2004;37(2):183-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Beer
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Wine
Abstract
A large number of prospective studies have observed an inverse relationship between a moderate intake of alcohol and coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality. Concerning death from all-causes, results are not unanimous. Alcohol intake was associated with a protection of all-cause mortality in England and USA physicians and the large study of the American Cancer Society. None of these studies separated the effects of different alcoholic beverages. In our prospective studies in France on 35 000 middle-aged men, we observed that only wine at moderate intake, was associated with a protective effect on all-cause mortality. The reason was that in addition to the known effect on cardiovascular diseases, a very moderate intake of wine, protected also from cancer and other causes as confirmed by Gronbaek in Denmark. Our recent results also indicate that the protective effect of a moderate intake of wine on all-cause mortality is observed at all levels of blood pressure and serum cholesterol.
PubMed ID
15455645 View in PubMed
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Association of alcohol consumption to morality in middle-aged U.S. and Russian men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205958
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1998 Apr;8(3):147-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
A. Deev
D. Shestov
J. Abernathy
A. Kapustina
N. Muhina
S. Irving
Author Affiliation
National Center for Preventive Medicine, Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1998 Apr;8(3):147-53
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to assess the relationships of alcohol consumption to total and cardiovascular disease mortality in U.S. and Russian men and women after adjustment for several covariates. A secondary objective is to determine how this relationship varies by country and gender.
Men aged 40-59 and women aged 40-69 screened in Russia and the U.S. between 1972 and 1982 were followed for mortality for 13 years as part of the Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence and Follow-up Studies. Alcohol consumption was based on a 7-day recall of drinks of beer, wine, mixed drinks, and liquors. Drinkers of alcohol were classified into four levels based on amount consumed during the recall period.
Age-adjusted mortality rates were higher for non-drinkers than lower level drinkers in both genders and countries, and there was an indication that mortality rates for high level drinkers, especially in men, approached those of non-drinkers. When mortality rates were adjusted for other risk factors they remained higher for non-drinkers in U.S. men and women, but in Russia, with one exception, there was no difference in mortality rates between drinkers and non-drinkers. Relative risks for cardiovascular disease mortality rates were similar to those of total mortality.
Beneficial association of alcohol consumption and mortality may be limited depending upon the prevalence of other risk factors in the studied population.
PubMed ID
9548999 View in PubMed
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Bariatric surgery and long-term cardiovascular events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128246
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-2012
Author
Lars Sjöström
Markku Peltonen
Peter Jacobson
C David Sjöström
Kristjan Karason
Hans Wedel
Sofie Ahlin
Åsa Anveden
Calle Bengtsson
Gerd Bergmark
Claude Bouchard
Björn Carlsson
Sven Dahlgren
Jan Karlsson
Anna-Karin Lindroos
Hans Lönroth
Kristina Narbro
Ingmar Näslund
Torsten Olbers
Per-Arne Svensson
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. lars.v.sjostrom@medfak.gu.se
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65
Date
Jan-4-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Obesity - surgery
Prospective Studies
Stroke - mortality - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Weight loss might protect against cardiovascular events, but solid evidence is lacking.
To study the association between bariatric surgery, weight loss, and cardiovascular events.
The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study is an ongoing, nonrandomized, prospective, controlled study conducted at 25 public surgical departments and 480 primary health care centers in Sweden of 2010 obese participants who underwent bariatric surgery and 2037 contemporaneously matched obese controls who received usual care. Patients were recruited between September 1, 1987, and January 31, 2001. Date of analysis was December 31, 2009, with median follow-up of 14.7 years (range, 0-20 years). Inclusion criteria were age 37 to 60 years and a body mass index of at least 34 in men and at least 38 in women. Exclusion criteria were identical in surgery and control patients. Surgery patients underwent gastric bypass (13.2%), banding (18.7%), or vertical banded gastroplasty (68.1%), and controls received usual care in the Swedish primary health care system. Physical and biochemical examinations and database cross-checks were undertaken at preplanned intervals.
The primary end point of the SOS study (total mortality) was published in 2007. Myocardial infarction and stroke were predefined secondary end points, considered separately and combined.
Bariatric surgery was associated with a reduced number of cardiovascular deaths (28 events among 2010 patients in the surgery group vs 49 events among 2037 patients in the control group; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; 95% CI, 0.29-0.76; P = .002). The number of total first time (fatal or nonfatal) cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction or stroke, whichever came first) was lower in the surgery group (199 events among 2010 patients) than in the control group (234 events among 2037 patients; adjusted HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.83; P
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2012 Mar;8(3):13022271190
Comment In: JAMA. 2012 Apr 18;307(15):1577; author reply 1577-822511678
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Mar;9(3):12622271018
Comment In: Praxis (Bern 1994). 2012 May 9;101(10):673-522565560
Comment In: JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):88-922215170
PubMed ID
22215166 View in PubMed
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Benefit of clopidogrel therapy in patients with myocardial infarction and chronic kidney disease-a Danish nation-wide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267083
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014 Aug;3(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Thalia Marie Blicher
Kristine Hommel
Søren Lund Kristensen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Mette Madsen
Anne-Lise Kamper
Jonas Bjerring Olesen
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014 Aug;3(4)
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Denmark
Female
Hemorrhage
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - drug therapy - surgery
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Renal Dialysis
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - complications
Ticlopidine - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate clopidogrel treatment after incident myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD).
By linking nation-wide registries, information about patients admitted with incident MI was found. Primary endpoints were all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality, a composite of all-cause mortality and recurrent MI, and a composite of fatal and nonfatal bleedings. Effect of clopidogrel use versus clopidogrel nonuse was estimated using an adjusted Cox's regression model stratified according to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) treatment.A total of 69 082 incident MI patients in the period 2002-2011 were included. Clopidogrel treatment was associated with hazard ratios (HRs) for the combined endpoint of all-cause mortality and recurrent MI in PCI-treated patients of 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 1.72) in renal replacement therapy (RRT) patients, 0.59 (95% CI: 0.40 to 0.88) in non-end-stage CKD patients and 0.69 (95% CI, 0.61 to 0.77) in patients without kidney disease (P for interaction=0.60). In patients not treated with PCI, HRs were 0.90 (95% CI, 0.68 to 1.21) in RRT patients, 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.99) in non-end-stage CKD patients, and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.87 to 0.95) in patients without kidney disease (P for interaction=0.74). An increase in bleeding events (not significant) was noted for clopidogrel-treated patients not undergoing PCI and for non-end-stage CKD patients undergoing PCI, whereas clopidogrel was associated with less bleedings in PCI-treated RRT patients and patients without kidney disease.
During a 1-year follow-up, after MI, clopidogrel was associated with improved outcomes in patients with non-end-stage CKD. Even though no effect difference, compared to patients without CKD, was observed, the benefit associated with the use of clopidogrel after MI in patients requiring RRT is less clear.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25146707 View in PubMed
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Body mass index versus waist circumference as predictors of mortality in Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127945
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Nov;36(11):1450-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
A E Staiano
B A Reeder
S. Elliott
M R Joffres
P. Pahwa
S A Kirkland
G. Paradis
P T Katzmarzyk
Author Affiliation
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Nov;36(11):1450-4
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - mortality - prevention & control
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects - mortality
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Elevated body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) are associated with increased mortality risk, but it is unclear which anthropometric measurement most highly relates to mortality. We examined single and combined associations between BMI, WC, waist-hip ratio (WHR) and all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality.
We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to estimate relative risks of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality in 8061 adults (aged 18-74 years) in the Canadian Heart Health Follow-Up Study (1986-2004). Models controlled for age, sex, exam year, smoking, alcohol use and education.
There were 887 deaths over a mean 13 (SD 3.1) years follow-up. Increased risk of death from all-causes, CVD and cancer were associated with elevated BMI, WC and WHR (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22249224 View in PubMed
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The burden of cardiovascular diseases in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199381
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Dec;15 Suppl G:20G-4G
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
B. Reeder
G. Taylor
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Dec;15 Suppl G:20G-4G
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
PubMed ID
10692653 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.