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A 15-Year Follow-Up Study of Sense of Humor and Causes of Mortality: The Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284817
Source
Psychosom Med. 2016 Apr;78(3):345-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Solfrid Romundstad
Sven Svebak
Are Holen
Jostein Holmen
Source
Psychosom Med. 2016 Apr;78(3):345-53
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Affect
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cognition
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infection - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Protective factors
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Perception
Wit and Humor as Topic
Abstract
Associations between the sense of humor and survival in relation to specific diseases has so far never been studied.
We conducted a 15-year follow-up study of 53,556 participants in the population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway. Cognitive, social, and affective components of the sense of humor were obtained, and associations with all-cause mortality, mortality due to cardiovascular diseases (CVD), infections, cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs).
After multivariate adjustments, high scores on the cognitive component of the sense of humor were significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality in women (HR = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.33-0.81), but not in men (HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.59-1.32). Mortality due to CVD was significantly lower in women with high scores on the cognitive component (HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.15-0.47), and so was mortality due to infections both in men (HR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.09-0.74) and women (HR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.04-0.76). The social and affective components of the sense of humor were not associated with mortality. In the total population, the positive association between the cognitive component of sense of humor and survival was present until the age of 85 years.
The cognitive component of the sense of humor is positively associated with survival from mortality related to CVD and infections in women and with infection-related mortality in men. The findings indicate that sense of humor is a health-protecting cognitive coping resource.
PubMed ID
26569539 View in PubMed
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[20-year experience with the North Karelia Project. Preventive activities yield results].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219246
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(2):54-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
P. Puska
E. Vartiainen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Nissinen
Author Affiliation
Avd för epidemiologi och hälsofrämjande, Folkhälsoinstitutet, Helsingfors.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(2):54-5
Date
1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
PubMed ID
8121789 View in PubMed
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40-Year CHD Mortality Trends and the Role of Risk Factors in Mortality Decline: The North Karelia Project Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289324
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
06-2016
Author
Pekka Jousilahti
Tiina Laatikainen
Veikko Salomaa
Arto Pietilä
Erkki Vartiainen
Pekka Puska
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Health, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: pekka.jousilahti@thl.fi.
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Public Health
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
In the 1960s and early 1970s, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in Finland was the highest in the world, and within Finland, mortality was particularly high in the eastern part of the country. The North Karelia Project, the first large community-based cardiovascular diseases prevention program was established in 1972 to reduce the extremely high CHD mortality through behavioral change and reduction of the main cardiovascular disease risk factors among the whole population of North Karelia, the easternmost province of Finland. During the 40-year period from 1972 to 2012, smoking prevalence, serum total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure declined markedly, except a small increase in serum cholesterol levels between 2007 and 2012. From the early 1970s to 2012, CHD mortality decreased by 82% (from 643 to 118 per 100,000) among working-age (35 to 64 years) men. Among working-age women, the decline was 84% (from 114 to 17 per 100,000). During the first 10 years, changes in these 3 target risk factors explained nearly all of the observed mortality reduction. Since the mid-1980s, the observed reduction in mortality has been larger than the predicted reduction. In the early 1970s, premature CHD mortality (35 to 74 years) was about 37% higher among Eastern Finnish men and 23% higher among Eastern Finnish women, compared with men and women in Southwestern Finland. During the last 40 years, premature CHD mortality declined markedly in both areas, but the decline was larger in Eastern Finland and the mortality gap between the two areas nearly disappeared.
PubMed ID
27242088 View in PubMed
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[A 1 year study at a coroner's station of cause of death in primary heart-aorta cases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255698
Source
Lakartidningen. 1972 Jan 12;69(3):264-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-1972

The ability of an electrocardiogram to predict fatal and non-fatal cardiac events in asymptomatic middle-aged subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283977
Source
Ann Med. 2016 Nov;48(7):525-531
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Henri K Terho
Jani T Tikkanen
Tuomas V Kenttä
M Juhani Junttila
Aapo L Aro
Olli Anttonen
Tuomas Kerola
Harri A Rissanen
Paul Knekt
Antti Reunanen
Heikki V Huikuri
Source
Ann Med. 2016 Nov;48(7):525-531
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Electrocardiography - methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
The long-term prognostic value of a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) for predicting cardiac events in apparently healthy middle-aged subjects is not well defined.
A total of 9511 middle-aged subjects (mean age 43?±?8.2 years, 52% males) without a known cardiac disease and with a follow-up 40 years were included in the study. Fatal and non-fatal cardiac events were collected from the national registries. The predictive value of ECG was separately analyzed for 10 and 30 years. Major ECG abnormalities were classified according to the Minnesota code.
Subjects with major ECG abnormalities (N?=?1131) had an increased risk of cardiac death after 10-years (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.7; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.1-2.5, p?=?0.009) and 30-years of follow-up (HR 1.3, 95% CI, 1.1-1.5, p?
PubMed ID
27684209 View in PubMed
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Accelerometer-measured sedentary time and physical activity-A 15 year follow-up of mortality in a Swedish population-based cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294710
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Jul; 21(7):702-707
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Ing-Mari Dohrn
Michael Sjöström
Lydia Kwak
Pekka Oja
Maria Hagströmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. Electronic address: ing-mari.dohrn@ki.se.
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Jul; 21(7):702-707
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate the associations of objectively assessed sedentary time, light intensity physical activity (PA), moderate to vigorous intensity PA (MVPA), and total PA with all-cause mortality and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) or cancer in a Swedish population-based cohort with 15 years follow-up time.
Longitudinal prospective cohort study.
Data from 851 persons (56% women) =35 years at baseline were included. Primary exposure variables were time (min/day) spent sedentary, in light intensity PA and in MVPA, and total counts from an Actigraph 7164 accelerometer. Data on all-cause mortality and mortality from CVD or cancer were obtained from Swedish registers. Cox proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) of mortality with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Compared with the least sedentary participants, those in the most sedentary tertile had an increased risk of all-cause mortality, HR: 2.7 (1.4, 5.3), CVD mortality, HR: 5.5 (1.4, 21.2) and cancer mortality, HR: 4.3 (1.2, 16.0). For all-cause mortality, those in the highest light intensity PA tertile had a HR 0.34 (0.17, 0.67) compared with the lowest tertile. A similar pattern was found for CVD and cancer mortality. More time spent in MVPA was associated with the largest risk reduction for CVD mortality, with an almost 90% lower risk in the tertile with the most time in MVPA.
This study confirms a strong inverse relationship between MVPA and mortality, and adds new insight for the understanding of the associations between sedentary time and light intensity PA and mortality.
PubMed ID
29128418 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of death certificates of cardiovascular disease in a community intervention in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107744
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):883-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Anders Eriksson
Hans Stenlund
Kristin Ahlm
Kurt Boman
Lars Olov Bygren
Lars Age Johansson
Bert-Ove Olofsson
Stig Wall
Lars Weinehall
Author Affiliation
1Research Unit Skellefteå, Internal Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):883-9
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the possibility to evaluate the mortality pattern in a community intervention programme against cardiovascular disease by official death certificates.
For all deceased in the intervention area (Norsjö), the accuracy of the official death certificates were compared with matched controls in the rest of Västerbotten. The official causes of death were compared with new certificates, based on the last clinical record, issued by three of the authors, and coded by one of the authors, all four accordingly blinded.
The degree of agreement between the official underlying causes of death in "cardiovascular disease" (CVD) and the re-evaluated certificates was not found to differ between Norsjö and the rest of Västerbotten. The agreement was 87% and 88% at chapter level, respectively, but only 55% and 55% at 4-digit level, respectively. The reclassification resulted in a 1% decrease of "cardiovascular deaths" in both Norsjö and the rest of Västerbotten.
The disagreements in the reclassification of cause of death were equal but large in both directions. The official death certificates should be used with caution to evaluate CVD in small community intervention programmes, and restricted to the chapter level and total populations.
PubMed ID
23982462 View in PubMed
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Achieving a 25% reduction in premature non-communicable disease mortality: the Swedish population as a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265383
Source
BMC Med. 2015;13:65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ailiana Santosa
Joacim Rocklöv
Ulf Högberg
Peter Byass
Source
BMC Med. 2015;13:65
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The 2012 World Health Assembly set a target for Member States to reduce premature non-communicable disease (NCD) mortality by 25% over the period 2010 to 2025. This reflected concerns about increasing NCD mortality burdens among productive adults globally. This article first considers whether the WHO target of a 25% reduction in the unconditional probability of dying between ages of 30 and 70 from NCDs (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, or chronic respiratory diseases) has already taken place in Sweden during an equivalent 15-year period. Secondly, it assesses which population sub-groups have been more or less successful in contributing to overall changes in premature NCD mortality in Sweden.
A retrospective dynamic cohort database was constructed from Swedish population registers in the Linnaeus database, covering the entire population in the age range 30 to 69 years for the period 1991 to 2006, which was used directly to measure reductions in premature NCD mortality using a life table method as specified by the WHO. Multivariate Poisson regression models were used to assess the contributions of individual background factors to decreases in premature NCD mortality.
A total of 292,320 deaths occurred in the 30 to 69 year age group during the period 1991 to 2006, against 70,768,848 person-years registered. The crude all-cause mortality rate declined from 5.03 to 3.72 per 1,000 person-years, a 26% reduction. Within this, the unconditional probability of dying between the ages of 30 and 70 from NCD causes as defined by the WHO fell by 30.0%. Age was consistently the strongest determinant of NCD mortality. Background determinants of NCD mortality changed significantly over the four time periods 1991-1994, 1995-1998, 1999-2002, and 2003-2006.
Sweden, now at a late stage of epidemiological transition, has already exceeded the 25% premature NCD mortality reduction target during an earlier 15-year period. This should be encouraging news for countries currently implementing premature NCD mortality reduction programmes. Our findings suggest, however, that it may be difficult for Sweden and other late-transition countries to reach the current 25?×?25 target, particularly where substantial premature mortality reductions have already been achieved.
Notes
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2015 Mar;69(3):207-17; discussion 205-624964740
Cites: Gac Sanit. 2015 Jan-Feb;29(1):15-2025176130
Cites: Lancet Glob Health. 2014 Dec;2(12):e693-425433624
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(9 Suppl):211-2823238409
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2014;7:2357424848657
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(9 Suppl):135-6323238405
Cites: Lancet. 2015 Jan 17;385(9964):239-5225242039
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(7):761-720851848
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2014;7:2536525377326
Cites: Lancet. 2014 Aug 2;384(9941):427-3724797573
Cites: Lancet. 2014 Jul 12;384(9938):105-725012115
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(9 Suppl):197-21023238408
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Apr 23;377(9775):1438-4721474174
PubMed ID
25889300 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and total and cause-specific mortality among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268918
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Nina Roswall
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Guri Skeie
Anja Olsen
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Diet
Edible Grain
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Several healthy dietary patterns have been linked to longevity. Recently, a Nordic dietary pattern was associated with a lower overall mortality. No study has, however, investigated this dietary pattern in relation to cause-specific mortality. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index (consisting of wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish/shellfish) and overall mortality, and death by cardiovascular disease, cancer, injuries/suicide and other causes. We conducted a prospective analysis in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 44,961 women, aged 29-49 years, who completed a food frequency questionnaire between 1991-1992, and have been followed up for mortality ever since, through Swedish registries. The median follow-up time is 21.3 years, and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. Compared to women with the lowest index score (0-1 points), those with the highest score (4-6 points) had an 18% lower overall mortality (MRR 0.82; 0.71-0.93, p
PubMed ID
25784368 View in PubMed
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Adiposity and physical activity as predictors of cardiovascular mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79553
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2006 Dec;13(6):909-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Vatten Lars J
Nilsen Tom I L
Romundstad Pål R
Drøyvold Wenche B
Holmen Jostein
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7489 Trondheim, Norway. Lars.Vatten@ntnu.no
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2006 Dec;13(6):909-15
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether cardiovascular mortality related to obesity could be modified by physical activity. DESIGN: Mortality follow-up. SETTING: Population study. PARTICIPANTS: Participants in a health survey: 34 868 women and 32 872 men free from known cardiovascular disease or diabetes at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Total cardiovascular mortality. MAIN RESULTS: During 16 years of follow-up, 3026 women and 3526 men had died from cardiovascular causes. In middle age, obesity [body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher] was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death, but the association weakened with age. After 70, there was no association between BMI and cardiovascular death. At all ages, a lower level of physical activity was associated with a higher cardiovascular mortality. In women with high physical activity, indicated by at least 30 min of moderate to vigorous activity more than once a week, cardiovascular mortality was only slightly higher in the obese compared to lean women (adjusted relative risk, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-2.00). In men with high physical activity, cardiovascular mortality was, however, significantly higher among the obese (relative risk, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.40). In both genders cardiovascular mortality was substantially higher in obese people who reported no regular physical activity compared to obese people with a high level of physical activity. CONCLUSION: In obese women, being highly active may, to a large extent, compensate for the risk-increasing effect of being obese, whereas in obese men who engage in a high level of physical activity, the risk of cardiovascular death may be higher than in lean and equally active men.
PubMed ID
17143122 View in PubMed
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697 records – page 1 of 70.