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The 2000 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: part two--diagnosis and assessment of people with high blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192030
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K B Zarnke
M. Levine
F A McAlister
N R Campbell
M G Myers
D W McKay
P. Bolli
G. Honos
M. Lebel
K. Mann
T W Wilson
C. Abbott
S. Tobe
E. Burgess
S. Rabkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, 339 Windermere Road, London, Ontario N6A 5A5, Canada. Kelly.Zarnke@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - complications
Adult
Blood Pressure Determination - methods - psychology - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Diabetes Complications
Diabetic Nephropathies - complications - diagnosis
Echocardiography - standards
Electrocardiography
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Hypertension, Renovascular - diagnosis
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - ultrasonography
Office Visits
Patient compliance
Pheochromocytoma - complications - diagnosis
Risk factors
Self Care - methods - standards
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of high blood pressure in adults.
For people with high blood pressure, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension depends on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the duration of follow-up and the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases. For people diagnosed with hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment of the modifiable causes of hypertension. Out-of-clinic blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
People at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes and were identified and quantified.
Medline searches were conducted from the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1998 to October 2000). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of people at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
The identification of people at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle manoeuvres and the introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. In certain settings, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The present document contains detailed recommendations pertaining to aspects of the diagnosis and assessment of patients with hypertension, including the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular hypertension, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography in hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only the recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported here. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control of Health Canada.
PubMed ID
11773936 View in PubMed
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2009 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease in the adult - 2009 recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148105
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):567-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jacques Genest
Ruth McPherson
Jiri Frohlich
Todd Anderson
Norm Campbell
André Carpentier
Patrick Couture
Robert Dufour
George Fodor
Gordon A Francis
Steven Grover
Milan Gupta
Robert A Hegele
David C Lau
Lawrence Leiter
Gary F Lewis
Eva Lonn
G B John Mancini
Dominic Ng
Glen J Pearson
Allan Sniderman
James A Stone
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada. jacques.genest@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):567-79
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Congresses as topic
Diagnostic Techniques, Cardiovascular
Dyslipidemias - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Risk Assessment - methods
Societies, Medical
Abstract
The present article represents the 2009 update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease in the adult.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19812802 View in PubMed
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The 2012 Canadian hypertension education program recommendations for the management of hypertension: blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124290
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert R Quinn
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Daniel G Hackam
Simon W Rabkin
Doreen M Rabi
Richard E Gilbert
Raj S Padwal
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Tavis S Campbell
Lyne Cloutier
Steven Grover
George Honos
Robert J Herman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas Wilson
Ross D Feldman
M Patrice Lindsay
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Maxime Lamarre-Cliché
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Norman R C Campbell
Debra Reid
Luc Poirier
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. stella.daskalopoulou@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - methods
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - standards
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2012. The new recommendations are: (1) use of home blood pressure monitoring to confirm a diagnosis of white coat syndrome; (2) mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may be used in selected patients with hypertension and systolic heart failure; (3) a history of atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension should not be a factor in deciding to prescribe an angiotensin-receptor blocker for the treatment of hypertension; and (4) the blood pressure target for patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease has now been changed to
PubMed ID
22595447 View in PubMed
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[A cardiovascular health promotion program for 9-12 year old children and the community of Saint-Louis du Parc/Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202967
Source
Sante Publique. 1998 Dec;10(4):425-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
L. Renaud
J. O'Loughlin
G. Paradis
S. Chevalier
Author Affiliation
Régie régionale de Montréal-Centre, Québec.
Source
Sante Publique. 1998 Dec;10(4):425-45
Date
Dec-1998
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Risk factors
Urban Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
This article presents a programme for cardiovascular health for 9 to 12 years old children, called "Healthy Heart" Saint-Louis du Parc and carried out in low socioeconomic and multiethnic part of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. These five years programme targets were more both spheres: school and community (leisure centre, ethnocultural centre, groceries and other places). We develop the objectives, the conceptual models underlying to the programme, the perspective of work, the infrastructure of the programme: its staff and financing, the partnerships and the structure organising. Then we present the various interventions carried out along the period and so a description of many evaluations. At last, we discuss about the programme continuation.
PubMed ID
10065008 View in PubMed
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Aerobic interval training reduces cardiovascular risk factors more than a multitreatment approach in overweight adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92670
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2009 Feb;116(4):317-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Tjønna Arnt E
Stølen Tomas O
Bye Anja
Volden Marte
Slørdahl Stig A
Odegård Rønnaug
Skogvoll Eirik
Wisløff Ulrik
Author Affiliation
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Clin Sci (Lond). 2009 Feb;116(4):317-26
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Obesity - complications - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Overweight - complications - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Oxygen consumption
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of a multidisciplinary approach (MTG) and aerobic interval training (AIT) on cardiovascular risk factors in overweight adolescents. A total of 62 overweight and obese adolescents from Trøndelag County in Norway, referred to medical treatment at St Olav's Hospital, Trondheim, Norway, were invited to participate. Of these, 54 adolescents (age, 14.0 +/- 0.3 years) were randomized to either AIT (4 x 4 min intervals at 90% of maximal heart rate, each interval separated by 3 min at 70%, twice a week for 3 months) or to MTG (exercise, dietary and psychological advice, twice a month for 12 months). Follow-up testing occurred at 3 and 12 months. VO(2max) (maximal oxygen uptake) increased more after AIT compared with MTG, both at 3 months (11 compared with 0%; P
Notes
Comment In: Clin Sci (Lond). 2009 Feb;116(4):315-619076061
PubMed ID
18673303 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol is not all bad--moderate intake reduces risk of common diseases. Research data leads public health work to a difficult balance].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118558
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Oct 17-23;109(42):1884-8
Publication Type
Article

Ambulatory blood pressure adds little to Framingham Risk Score for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in older men: secondary analysis of observational study data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264046
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(9):e006044
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Katy J L Bell
Elaine Beller
Johan Sundström
Kevin McGeechan
Andrew Hayen
Les Irwig
Bruce Neal
Paul Glasziou
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(9):e006044
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - statistics & numerical data
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the incremental value of ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in predicting cardiovascular risk when the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) is known.
We included 780 men without cardiovascular disease from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, all aged approximately 70 years at baseline. We first screened ambulatory systolic BP (ASBP) parameters for their incremental value by adding them to a model with 10-year FRS. For the best ASBP parameter we estimated HRs and changes in discrimination, calibration and reclassification. We also estimated the difference in the number of men started on treatment and in the number of men protected against a cardiovascular event.
Mean daytime ASBP had the highest incremental value; adding other parameters did not yield further improvements. While ASBP was an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, addition to FRS led to only small increases to the overall model fit, discrimination (a 1% increase in the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve), calibration and reclassification. We estimated that for every 10,000 men screened with ASBP, 141 fewer would start a new BP-lowering treatment (95% CI 62 to 220 less treated), but this would result in 7 fewer cardiovascular events prevented over the subsequent 10 years (95% CI 21 fewer events prevented to 7 more events prevented).
In addition to a standard cardiovascular risk assessment it is not clear that ambulatory BP measurement provides further incremental value. The clinical role of ambulatory BP requires ongoing careful consideration.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25200562 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of lipid-lowering therapy and factors affecting regularity of statin intake in patients with cardiovascular disease enrolled in the PROFILE registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279509
Source
Rev Port Cardiol. 2015 Feb;34(2):111-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Oleg Gaisenok
Sergey Martsevich
Svetlana Tripkosh
Yulia Lukina
Source
Rev Port Cardiol. 2015 Feb;34(2):111-6
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Portuguese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Moscow
Registries
Self Report
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the quality of lipid-lowering therapy in a cohort of patients with cardiovascular disease enrolled in a Moscow-based registry, and to analyze the factors affecting the regularity of statin administration in this patient category.
The present study included all patients who successively sought medical advice in the Preventive Pharmacotherapy Department of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation between May 1 and December 31, 2011 (n=274). Each patient was given a specially designed questionnaire in order to assess compliance with the prescribed treatment that included the following questions: (1) if they knew, according to the results of previous exams, that they had elevated cholesterol levels (yes, no, don't know); (2) what method of hypercholesterolemia correction they used (diet, medication, physical exercise, or other); (3) if they were taking any statins (regularly, no, irregularly); and (4) if yes, what statin preparation and what dose they were taking. Patients' compliance with statin therapy was assessed on the basis of the responses received and the regularity of statin intake.
The influence of various factors on regularity of statin intake in patients with cardiovascular disease was assessed by calculating odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for advanced age (>70 years) (OR 0.49); higher statin dose than standard (OR 0.49); hypertension (OR 1.659); history of acute cerebrovascular event (OR 2.019); diabetes (OR 1.023); coronary heart disease (CHD) (OR 4.357); history of myocardial infarction (MI) (OR 4.838); history of coronary angiography/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (OR 5.167).
Analysis of factors with impact on regular compliance with statin therapy showed that the following were most significant: CHD, history of MI, and history of PCI. Previous cerebrovascular events and presence of diabetes did not motivate these patients to take statins on a regular basis.
PubMed ID
25660463 View in PubMed
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Association between serum cholesterol and eating behaviours during early childhood: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112991
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Aug 6;185(11):E531-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-6-2013
Author
Navindra Persaud
Jonathon L Maguire
Gerald Lebovic
Sarah Carsley
Marina Khovratovich
Janis A Randall Simpson
Brian W McCrindle
Patricia C Parkin
Catherine Birken
Author Affiliation
Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Toronto, Ont. nav.persaud @utoronto.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Aug 6;185(11):E531-6
Date
Aug-6-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Early Medical Intervention
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - complications - diagnosis
Male
Primary Health Care
Risk assessment
Abstract
Modifiable behaviours during early childhood may provide opportunities to prevent disease processes before adverse outcomes occur. Our objective was to determine whether young children's eating behaviours were associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life.
In this cross-sectional study involving children aged 3-5 years recruited from 7 primary care practices in Toronto, Ontario, we assessed the relation between eating behaviours as assessed by the NutriSTEP (Nutritional Screening Tool for Every Preschooler) questionnaire (completed by parents) and serum levels of non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, a surrogate marker of cardiovascular risk. We also assessed the relation between dietary intake and serum non-HDL cholesterol, and between eating behaviours and other laboratory indices of cardiovascular risk (low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, HDL cholesterol and apoliprotein A1).
A total of 1856 children were recruited from primary care practices in Toronto. Of these children, we included 1076 in our study for whom complete data and blood samples were available for analysis. The eating behaviours subscore of the NutriSTEP tool was significantly associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol (p = 0.03); for each unit increase in the eating behaviours subscore suggesting greater nutritional risk, we saw an increase of 0.02 mmol/L (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.002 to 0.05) in serum non-HDL cholesterol. The eating behaviours subscore was also associated with LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B, but not with HDL cholesterol or apolipoprotein A1. The dietary intake subscore was not associated with non-HDL cholesterol.
Eating behaviours in preschool-aged children are important potentially modifiable determinants of cardiovascular risk and should be a focus for future studies of screening and behavioural interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23775611 View in PubMed
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Association of BMI and fasting insulin with cardiovascular disease risk factors in seven-year-old Icelandic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94334
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2009;27(3):186-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Hrafnkelsson Hannes
Magnusson Kristjan T H
Sigurdsson Emil L
Johannsson Erlingur
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. hrafnkelsson@hotmail.is
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2009;27(3):186-91
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fasting
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Insulin - blood
Life Style
Lipids - blood
Male
Overweight - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:. To look at overweight and common cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, and associations with body mass index (BMI) and fasting insulin in seven-year-old schoolchildren in Reykjavik, Iceland. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of seven-year-old schoolchildren. SETTING: Six elementary schools in Reykjavik. SUBJECTS: All children attending second grade in these six schools were invited to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Overweight, fasting serum insulin, CVD risk factors. RESULTS: Some 14% of the participating children were classified as overweight. Overweight children had higher fasting insulin, higher fasting glucose, and higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Furthermore, they had significantly lower total cholesterol (TC), lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) but a similar TC/LDL ratio to normal-weight children. The factors that were strongly associated with BMI were serum fasting insulin, systolic blood pressure (SBP), HDL and fasting glucose, while the sum of four skinfolds, triglycerides, glucose, and LDL were highly associated with fasting insulin. CONCLUSION: Overweight children are likelier to have unfavourable levels of common CVD risk factors included in metabolic syndrome, but surprisingly had lower LDL and TC. Skinfold thickness, higher triglyceride and glucose levels, and being female were associated with increased serum insulin.
PubMed ID
19731182 View in PubMed
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