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527 records – page 1 of 53.

[10-year trends in body weight in men and women in Novosibirsk (1985-1995)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174900
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
E S Kylbanova
S K Maliutina
N V Nasonova
Iu P Nikitin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siberia
Weight Gain
Abstract
To assess 10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity in Novosibirsk population.
The data of three population surveys (a total of 9714 men and women aged 25-64 years) carried out according to WHO MONICA program.
Obesity prevalence among males in 1985-1989 tended to a small rise without changes during subsequent 5 years. In females the prevalence of obesity and overweight decreased in 1985-1994.
10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity were insignificant in men and beneficial in women of Novosibirsk population while the frequency of increased body mass in women remains relatively high.
PubMed ID
15881103 View in PubMed
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The 2000 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: part two--diagnosis and assessment of people with high blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192030
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K B Zarnke
M. Levine
F A McAlister
N R Campbell
M G Myers
D W McKay
P. Bolli
G. Honos
M. Lebel
K. Mann
T W Wilson
C. Abbott
S. Tobe
E. Burgess
S. Rabkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, 339 Windermere Road, London, Ontario N6A 5A5, Canada. Kelly.Zarnke@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - complications
Adult
Blood Pressure Determination - methods - psychology - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Diabetes Complications
Diabetic Nephropathies - complications - diagnosis
Echocardiography - standards
Electrocardiography
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Hypertension, Renovascular - diagnosis
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - ultrasonography
Office Visits
Patient compliance
Pheochromocytoma - complications - diagnosis
Risk factors
Self Care - methods - standards
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of high blood pressure in adults.
For people with high blood pressure, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension depends on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the duration of follow-up and the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases. For people diagnosed with hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment of the modifiable causes of hypertension. Out-of-clinic blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
People at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes and were identified and quantified.
Medline searches were conducted from the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1998 to October 2000). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of people at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
The identification of people at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle manoeuvres and the introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. In certain settings, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The present document contains detailed recommendations pertaining to aspects of the diagnosis and assessment of patients with hypertension, including the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular hypertension, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography in hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only the recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported here. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control of Health Canada.
PubMed ID
11773936 View in PubMed
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2009 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease in the adult - 2009 recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148105
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):567-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jacques Genest
Ruth McPherson
Jiri Frohlich
Todd Anderson
Norm Campbell
André Carpentier
Patrick Couture
Robert Dufour
George Fodor
Gordon A Francis
Steven Grover
Milan Gupta
Robert A Hegele
David C Lau
Lawrence Leiter
Gary F Lewis
Eva Lonn
G B John Mancini
Dominic Ng
Glen J Pearson
Allan Sniderman
James A Stone
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada. jacques.genest@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):567-79
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Congresses as topic
Diagnostic Techniques, Cardiovascular
Dyslipidemias - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Risk Assessment - methods
Societies, Medical
Abstract
The present article represents the 2009 update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease in the adult.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19812802 View in PubMed
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The 2012 Canadian hypertension education program recommendations for the management of hypertension: blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124290
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert R Quinn
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Daniel G Hackam
Simon W Rabkin
Doreen M Rabi
Richard E Gilbert
Raj S Padwal
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Tavis S Campbell
Lyne Cloutier
Steven Grover
George Honos
Robert J Herman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas Wilson
Ross D Feldman
M Patrice Lindsay
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Maxime Lamarre-Cliché
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Norman R C Campbell
Debra Reid
Luc Poirier
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. stella.daskalopoulou@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - methods
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - standards
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2012. The new recommendations are: (1) use of home blood pressure monitoring to confirm a diagnosis of white coat syndrome; (2) mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may be used in selected patients with hypertension and systolic heart failure; (3) a history of atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension should not be a factor in deciding to prescribe an angiotensin-receptor blocker for the treatment of hypertension; and (4) the blood pressure target for patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease has now been changed to
PubMed ID
22595447 View in PubMed
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Abdominal fat distribution and disease: an overview of epidemiological data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11905
Source
Ann Med. 1992 Feb;24(1):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
P. Björntorp
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Ann Med. 1992 Feb;24(1):15-8
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - pathology
Anthropometry
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Female
Hip
Humans
Male
Obesity - complications - metabolism - pathology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Recent prospective, epidemiological research has demonstrated the power of an increased waist/hip circumference ratio (WHR) to predict both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in men and women. Obesity, defined as an increased total body fat mass, seems to interact synergistically in the development of NIDDM, but not of CVD. Increased WHR with obesity (abdominal obesity) seems to be associated with a cluster of metabolic risk factors, as well as hypertension. This metabolic syndrome is closely linked to visceral fat mass. Increased WHR without obesity may instead be associated with lift style factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, physical inactivity, coagulation abnormalities, psychosocial, psychological and psychiatric factors. Direct observations show, and the risk factor associations further strengthen the assumption, that abdominal (visceral) obesity is more closely associated to NIDDM than CVD, while an increased WHR without obesity may be more closely linked to CVD than NIDDM. It remains to be established to what extent, if any, an increased WHR in lean men, and particularly in lean women, indicates fat distribution. Other components of the WHR measurement might be of more importance in this connection.
PubMed ID
1575956 View in PubMed
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[Abdominal obesity and associated comorbidities among primary care patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96760
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 May 24;172(21):1586-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2010
Author
Ketil Haugan
Dan Rost
Nils Knudsen
Leif Breum
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk Afdeling, Roskilde Sygehus, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. ketilhaugan@hotmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 May 24;172(21):1586-91
Date
May-24-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dyslipidemias - etiology
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Primary Health Care
Waist Circumference
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Abdominal obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia and hypertension. The prevalence of abdominal obesity and its relationship with these comorbidities have not previously been examined in Danish primary care patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The IDEA study was an international cross sectional study including 168,159 patients worldwide. In Denmark, 47 randomly selected general practitioners included 847 consecutive patients. Age, gender, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and the presence of known comorbidities were recorded for all patients. RESULTS: The prevalence of abdominal obesity (waist circumference = 80 cm for women and = 94 cm for men) was 66% among women and 60% among men. There was a significant relationship between the degree of abdominal obesity and the prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension for both sexes. There was a trend towards an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease with increased waist circumference. CONCLUSION: Abdominal obesity is very frequently found in Danish primary care patients, and it is associated with an increased prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Patients with increased waist circumference should be screened to diagnose comorbidities related to the abdominal obesity.
PubMed ID
20525471 View in PubMed
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Abdominal obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors within body mass index categories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121919
Source
Health Rep. 2012 Jun;23(2):7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Margot Shields
Mark S Tremblay
Sarah Connor Gorber
Ian Janssen
Author Affiliation
Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. margot.shields@statcan.gc.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2012 Jun;23(2):7-15
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat
Adolescent
Body mass index
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Obesity
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Several organizations recommend the use of measures of abdominal obesity in conjunction with body mass index (BMI) to assess obesity-related health risk. Recent evidence suggests that waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) are increasing within BMI categories. This shift may have affected the usefulness of abdominal obesity measures.
Data are from respondents aged 18 to 79 to the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey. Using logistic regression, this paper examines cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in relation to WC, WHR and WHtR within BMI health-risk categories. CVD risk factors considered include components of the metabolic syndrome.
Among men in the normal and overweight BMI categories, WHR and WHtR were positively associated with having at least two CVD risk factors. All three abdominal obesity measures were associated with increased odds of having at least two CVD risk factors among normal-weight women. Abdominal obesity was not associated with CVD risk factors for people in obese class I.
Among men and women in the normal BMI category, measures of abdominal obesity are associated with increased odds of CVD risk factors. This underscores the importance of measuring and monitoring abdominal obesity in normal-weight men and women.
PubMed ID
22866535 View in PubMed
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Absolute and relative risk of cardiovascular disease in men with prostate cancer: results from the Population-Based PCBaSe Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96622
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2010 Jul 20;28(21):3448-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2010
Author
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Hans Garmo
Lars Holmberg
Erik Ingelsson
Ola Bratt
Anna Bill-Axelson
Mats Lambe
Pär Stattin
Jan Adolfsson
Author Affiliation
King's College London, London, United Kingdom. mieke.vanhemelrijck@kcl.ac.uk
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2010 Jul 20;28(21):3448-56
Date
Jul-20-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Androgen Antagonists - adverse effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy
Risk
Abstract
PURPOSE: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a potential adverse effect of endocrine treatment (ET) for prostate cancer (PC). We investigated absolute and relative CVD risk in 76,600 patients with PC undergoing ET, curative treatment, or surveillance. METHODS: PCBaSe Sweden is based on the National Prostate Cancer Register, which covers more than 96% of PC cases. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of ischemic heart disease (IHD), acute myocardial infarction (MI), arrhythmia, heart failure, and stroke were calculated to compare observed and expected (using total Swedish population) numbers of CVD, taking into account age, calendar time, and previous CVD. RESULTS: Between 1997 and 2007, 30,642 patients with PC received primary ET, 26,432 curative treatment, and 19,527 surveillance. SIRs for CVD were elevated in all men with the highest for those undergoing ET, independent of circulatory disease history (SIR MI for men without circulatory disease history: 1.40 [95% CI, 1.31 to 1.49], 1.15 [95% CI, 1.01 to 1.31], and 1.20 [95% CI, 1.11 to 1.30] for men undergoing ET, curative treatment, and surveillance, respectively). Absolute risk differences (ARD) showed that two (arrhythmia) to eight (IHD) extra cases of CVD would occur per 1,000 person-years. SMRs showed similar patterns, with ARD of zero (arrhythmia) to three (IHD) per 1,000 person-years. CONCLUSION: Increased relative risks of nonfatal and fatal CVD were found among all men with PC, especially those treated with ET. Because ET is currently the only effective treatment for metastatic disease and the ARDs were rather small, our findings indicate that CVD risk should be considered when prescribing ET but should not constitute a contraindication when the expected gain is tangible.
PubMed ID
20567006 View in PubMed
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[A cardiovascular health promotion program for 9-12 year old children and the community of Saint-Louis du Parc/Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202967
Source
Sante Publique. 1998 Dec;10(4):425-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
L. Renaud
J. O'Loughlin
G. Paradis
S. Chevalier
Author Affiliation
Régie régionale de Montréal-Centre, Québec.
Source
Sante Publique. 1998 Dec;10(4):425-45
Date
Dec-1998
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Risk factors
Urban Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
This article presents a programme for cardiovascular health for 9 to 12 years old children, called "Healthy Heart" Saint-Louis du Parc and carried out in low socioeconomic and multiethnic part of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. These five years programme targets were more both spheres: school and community (leisure centre, ethnocultural centre, groceries and other places). We develop the objectives, the conceptual models underlying to the programme, the perspective of work, the infrastructure of the programme: its staff and financing, the partnerships and the structure organising. Then we present the various interventions carried out along the period and so a description of many evaluations. At last, we discuss about the programme continuation.
PubMed ID
10065008 View in PubMed
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[Acute forms of cardiopathy in pneumonias in children of early age]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44398
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1969 Jan-Feb;1:9-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
O S Orach
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1969 Jan-Feb;1:9-10
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cardiovascular System - physiopathology
PubMed ID
5401012 View in PubMed
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527 records – page 1 of 53.