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[8-year prospective study of acute cardiovascular pathology in an open population]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55641
Source
Ter Arkh. 1986;58(6):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
V V Gafarov
Source
Ter Arkh. 1986;58(6):45-8
Date
1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Age Factors
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Siberia
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Changes in the incidence of myocardial infarction, and associated mortality and lethality rates are reviewed over a 8-year period in an Novosibirsk district. Data on late postinfarction outcomes, obtained in a WHO-sponsored study, "Acute myocardial infarction register", are also presented. The incidence, mortality and lethality rates are showing a stabilization trend at present; in late outcomes, the greatest mortality and lethality rates fall to the first postinfarction year.
PubMed ID
3764714 View in PubMed
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30-Day Mortality after Cardiovascular Events in Persons with or without Alzheimer's Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274270
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(1):241-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jari Heiskanen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Risto P Roine
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(1):241-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemorrhagic Disorders
Humans
Male
Morbidity
Myocardial Infarction
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Proportional Hazards Models
Residence Characteristics
Stroke
Abstract
Persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been suggested to receive suboptimal treatment. We studied the 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or myocardial infarction in individuals with or without AD.
An exposure matched cohort of all Finnish community-dwellers diagnosed with clinically verified AD in 2005-2012 (n?=?73,005) and 1-4 matched comparison persons/AD-affected person (n?=?215,449). Data on 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke (n?=?16,419; deaths: n?=?2,748), hemorrhagic stroke (n?=?3,570; deaths: n?=?1,224), and myocardial infarction (n?=?15,304; deaths: n?=?3,804) were obtained from the National Hospital Discharge register. The main analyses were restricted to first-ever events.
Persons with AD had slightly higher 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke (adjusted HR 1.36, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.24,1.49), hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.98,1.25), or myocardial infarction (adjusted HR, 1.40, 9% CI 1.30,1.51). The associations were not affected by age, gender, or co-morbidities and remained similar when patients with previous ischemic strokes or infarctions were included. The absolute risk increase in 30-day mortality after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and myocardial infarction were 4.9% (95% CI 3.3,6.5), 3.3% (95% CI - 1.6,8.2), and 7.5% (95% CI 5.0,10.0), respectively.
Although the 30-day mortality was somewhat higher in the AD cohort, the absolute differences were small indicating that acute treatment was not notably inferior in AD patients. The slightly higher mortality was not explained by co-morbidities but may reflect the higher mortality of AD persons in general, or treatment practice of patients with severe cognitive impairment.
PubMed ID
26401944 View in PubMed
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A1C variability predicts incident cardiovascular events, microalbuminuria, and overt diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149324
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Nov;58(11):2649-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Johan Wadén
Carol Forsblom
Lena M Thorn
Daniel Gordin
Markku Saraheimo
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. per-henrik.groop@helsinki.fi
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Nov;58(11):2649-55
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Autoanalysis - methods
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose - metabolism
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
Recent data from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) indicated that A1C variability is associated with the risk of diabetes microvascular complications. However, these results might have been influenced by the interventional study design. Therefore, we investigated the longitudinal associations between A1C variability and diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes in the observational Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study.
A total of 2,107 patients in the FinnDiane Study had complete data on renal status and serial measurements of A1C from baseline to follow-up (median 5.7 years), and 1,845 patients had similar data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Intrapersonal SD of serially measured A1C was considered a measure of variability.
During follow-up, 10.2% progressed to a higher albuminuria level or to end-stage renal disease, whereas 8.6% had a CVD event. The SD of serial A1C was 1.01 versus 0.75 (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
19651819 View in PubMed
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Age-related macular degeneration in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and control subjects: a 10-year follow-up on evolution, risk factors, and prognostic significance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196519
Source
Diabetes Care. 2000 Nov;23(11):1672-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
R M Voutilainen-Kaunisto
M E Teräsvirta
M I Uusitupa
L K Niskanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2000 Nov;23(11):1672-8
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - physiopathology
Diabetic Retinopathy - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lipids - blood
Macular Degeneration - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Prognosis
Registries
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate the evolution of visual acuity, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and its relation to 10-year cardiovascular mortality and risk factors in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and control subjects.
A 10-year prospective study consisting of a representative group of 133 (70 men, 63 women) newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients diagnosed at health centers between 1979 and 1981 and 144 (62 men, 82 women) nondiabetic control subjects recruited from the population register was performed. The frequency of AMD was determined by grading of 45 degrees stereoscopic fundus photographs. The subjects were studied at baseline and after 5 and 10 years.
By the 10-year follow-up, visual acuity had declined more markedly in the diabetic patients than in the control subjects. Although the frequency of AMD was nearly the same in both groups (11-19%), it decreased visual acuity earlier in the diabetic patients than in the control group. AMD at baseline predicted 10-year cardiovascular mortality independently of adjustment for other risk factors in the diabetic patients (odds ratio [95% CI] 4.7 [1.1-19.3], P = 0.033).
Visual acuity deteriorated earlier in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients than in the control group although the cross-sectional frequency of AMD was nearly the same in both groups. Interestingly, AMD was an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetic patients, but the background mechanism(s) behind this association is unknown.
PubMed ID
11092291 View in PubMed
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Age-specific trends in morbidity, mortality and case-fatality from cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction and stroke in advanced age: evaluation in the Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113309
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(5):e64928
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Karin Modig
Tomas Andersson
Sven Drefahl
Anders Ahlbom
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. karin.modig@ki.se
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(5):e64928
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Registries
Risk
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
It is not clear if the downward trend in cardiovascular disease (CVD) observed for ages up to 85 years can be extended to the oldest old, those 85 years and above.
This nationwide cohort study presents age specific trends of CVD as well as for myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke separately for the period 1994 to 2010 for individuals 85 to 99 years old in Sweden. Data were extracted from national registries. All analyses were based on one-year age- and sex- specific figures. The risk for CVD increased with every age above 85 years although the rate of increase leveled off with age. Over time, the risk for CVD and MI decreased for all ages, and for stroke for ages up to 89 years. However, the risk of MI increased until around 2001 in all age groups and both sexes but decreased after that. The overall mortality improved for all outcomes over the period 1994 to 2010, so did the survival within 28 days from an event. The average annual decline in mortality over all ages, 85 and above was 3% for MI, 2% for stroke and for 2% CVD. Corresponding figures for ages 60-84 was 4% for each of MI, stroke and CVD. The results were similar for men and women.
Improvements in CVD risks observed among ages up to 85 years appear to have extended also to ages above 85 years, even if the rate of improvement plateaued with age. The improvements in survival for all ages up to 99 years give no support to the hypothesis that more fragile individuals reach higher ages. Additional research is needed to find out if improvement in survival can be seen also for the second and third event of CVD, stroke and MI.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23741426 View in PubMed
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Alcohol is implicated in the fluctuations in cardiovascular disease in Russia since the 1980s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196050
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2001 Jan;11(1):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
M. McKee
V. Shkolnikov
D A Leon
Author Affiliation
European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2001 Jan;11(1):1-6
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Prevalence
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Ann Epidemiol. 1999 Aug;9(6):339-4010475532
Comment On: Ann Epidemiol. 1999 Aug;9(6):335-810475531
PubMed ID
11164113 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in middle-aged Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147058
Source
Psychosom Med. 2010 Feb;72(2):187-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Tommi Tolmunen
Soili M Lehto
Maria Heliste
Sudhir Kurl
Jussi Kauhanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Kuopio University Hospital, FIN-70211 Kuopio, Finland. Tommi.Tolmunen@kuh.fi
Source
Psychosom Med. 2010 Feb;72(2):187-91
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Physical Fitness
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
To explore the associations between alexithymia and increased somatic morbidity. The mechanisms underlying these associations, however, are still unclear. Furthermore, data on the association between alexithymia and mortality are scarce.
A total of 2321 Finnish men, aged 46 to 61 years, were followed up for an average of 20 years. Mortality rates were obtained from the national register. The associations between baseline alexithymia and cardiovascular disease (CVD), all-cause, injury, and cancer deaths were examined with adjustments for age and several behavioral (smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity), physiological (low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, history of CVD), and psychosocial (marital status, education, depression) factors.
After all adjustments, the risk of CVD death was increased by 1.2% for each 1-point increase in Toronto Alexithymia Scale-26 scores.
Alexithymia is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality.
PubMed ID
19949161 View in PubMed
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All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality among Users of Basal Insulins NPH, Detemir, and Glargine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275159
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(3):e0151910
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Arto Y Strandberg
Fabian J Hoti
Timo E Strandberg
Solomon Christopher
Jari Haukka
Pasi Korhonen
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(3):e0151910
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Female
Finland
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin Glargine - therapeutic use
Insulin, Isophane - therapeutic use
Insulin, Long-Acting - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Risk
Abstract
Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes may increase mortality and cancer incidence, but the impact of different types of basal insulins on these endpoints is unclear. Compared to the traditional NPH insulin, the newer, longer-acting insulin analogues detemir and glargine have shown benefits in randomized controlled trials. Whether these advantages translate into lower mortality among users in real life is unknown.
To estimate the differences in all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates between new users of basal insulins in a population-based study in Finland.
23 751 individuals aged =40 with type 2 diabetes, who initiated basal insulin therapy in 2006-2009 were identified from national registers, with comprehensive data for mortality, causes of death, and background variables. Propensity score matching was performed on characteristics. Follow-up time was up to 4 years (median 1.7 years).
2078 deaths incurred. With NPH as reference, the adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality were 0.39 (95% CI, 0.30-0.50) for detemir, and 0.55 (95% CI, 0.44-0.69) for glargine. As compared to glargine, the HR was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.54-0.93) among detemir users. Compared to NPH, the mortality risk for both cardiovascular causes as well as cancer were also significantly lower for glargine, and especially for detemir in adjusted analysis. Furthermore, the results were robust in various sensitivity analyses.
In real clinical practice, mortality was substantially higher among users of NPH insulin as compared to insulins detemir or glargine. Considering the large number of patients who require insulin therapy, this difference in risk may have major clinical and public health implications. Due to limitations of the observational study design, further investigation using an interventional study design is warranted.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27031113 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76238
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2006 Mar;19(3):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Tine Willum Hansen
Jørgen Jeppesen
Susanne Rasmussen
Hans Ibsen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Prevention and Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. tw@heart.dk
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2006 Mar;19(3):243-50
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Circadian Rhythm
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Information on the relationship between ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular disease in the general population is sparse. METHODS: Prospective study of a random sample of 1700 Danish men and women, aged 41 to 72 years, without major cardiovascular diseases. At baseline, ambulatory BP, office BP, and other risk factors were recorded. The end point was a combined end point consisting of cardiovascular mortality, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 9.5 years, 156 end points were recorded. In multivariate models, the relative risk (95% confidence interval) associated with increments of 10/5 mmHg of systolic/diastolic ambulatory BP were 1.35 (1.21-1.50) and 1.27 (1.16-1.39). The corresponding figures for office BP were 1.18 (1.09-1.29) and 1.11 (1.03-1.19). Compared with normotension (office BP /=140/90 mm Hg; daytime BP /=135/85 mm Hg), and sustained hypertension (office BP >/=140/90 mm Hg; daytime BP >/=135/85 mm Hg) were 0.66 (0.30-1.44), 1.52 (0.91-2.54), and 2.10 (1.45-3.06), respectively. A blunted BP decrease at night was a risk factor (P = .02) in subjects with daytime ambulatory hypertension, but not in subjects with daytime ambulatory normotension (P = .13). CONCLUSIONS: Ambulatory BP provided prognostic information about cardiovascular disease better than office BP. Isolated office hypertension was not a risk factor and isolated ambulatory hypertension tended to be associated with increased risk. A blunted BP decrease at night was a risk factor in subjects with daytime ambulatory hypertension.
PubMed ID
16500508 View in PubMed
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The analysis of cumulative influence of factors of environment on a state of health of the population of Vladimir region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264565
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2015 May;7(3):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Tatyana Anatolyevna Trifonova
Leonid Alekseevich Shirkin
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2015 May;7(3):309-16
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Comorbidity
Environment
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
There was investigated the contribution of factors of environment to formation of health for adult population on indicators of mid-annual rates of growth/decrease of disease of system of blood circulation and of some interfaced nosology on an example of the population of Vladimir region. The differential criterion of primary disease of system of blood circulation is considered as an indicator, integrally reflecting degree of adaptation to environment conditions on population and suitable for construction short-term prognostic estimations. It is shown that business factors or the factors of a standard of living characterized by economic indicators, are leading risk factors in disease of system of blood circulation in Vladimir region which contribution is estimated by size of 38%. With use of regressive equations were received look-ahead estimations of annual rates of primary disease of system of blood circulation. In the regional centre Vladimir was observed more intense situation on rates of disease of system of blood circulation, than in Vladimir region.
PubMed ID
25948468 View in PubMed
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134 records – page 1 of 14.