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A 5-year follow-up study of disease incidence in men with an abnormal hormone pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47352
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
R. Rosmond
S. Wallerius
P. Wanger
L. Martin
G. Holm
P. Björntorp
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Institute, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Cerebrovascular Accident - epidemiology - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose - analysis
Humans
Hydrocortisone - analysis
Hypertension - epidemiology - metabolism
Incidence
Insulin - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have suggested that abnormal levels of cortisol and testosterone might increase the risk of serious somatic diseases. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a 5-year follow-up study in middle-aged men. METHODS: A population-based cohort study conducted in 1995 amongst 141 Swedish men born in 1944, in whom a clinical examination supplemented by medical history aimed to disclose the presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke), type 2 diabetes and hypertension were performed at baseline and at follow-up in the year 2000. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were measured repeatedly over the day. Serum testosterone concentrations were also determined. Using the baseline data, an algorithm was constructed, which classified the secretion pattern of cortisol and testosterone from each individual as being normal or abnormal. RESULTS: By the end of follow-up, men with an abnormal hormone secretion pattern (n = 73) had elevated mean arterial pressure (P = 0.003), fasting insulin (P = 0.009) and insulin : glucose ratio (P = 0.005) compared with men with a normal secretion pattern (n = 68). Body mass index, waist circumference, and waist : hip ratio were significantly elevated in both groups. However, the 5-year incidence of CVD, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
12974877 View in PubMed
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Cardiorespiratory fitness, C-reactive protein and lung cancer risk: A prospective population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266039
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2015 Jul;51(11):1365-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Perfenia Paul Pletnikoff
Jari A Laukkanen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jussi Kauhanen
Rainer Rauramaa
Kimmo Ronkainen
Sudhir Kurl
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2015 Jul;51(11):1365-70
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism - pathology
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - metabolism - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Physical Fitness
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Little is known about the joint impact of C-reactive protein (CRP) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in lung cancer risk. The aim of this study is to examine the joint impact of CRF and CRP in predicting lung cancer risk.
A population-based cohort study of 2276 men with no history of cancer was carried out. Baseline measures of CRP and CRF were divided into median values and categorised. During an average follow-up of 21-years, 73 cases of lung cancer occurred.
In a multivariate model, men with the combination of high CRP (>50% 1.24 mg/l) and low CRF (maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) 50% 30.08 ml/kg/min). Furthermore, men categorised in high CRP and combined with either low/high CRF, had an increased risk for lung cancer as compared to reference group. In further separate independent analysis for CRP and CRF, lung cancer risk was threefold for high CRP (RR 3.22, 95% CI 1.44-7.20, p 2.38 mg/l) and CRF (>35.15 ml/kg/min).
In this study, the joint impact of CRP and CRF is a strong risk marker for lung cancer. Furthermore, men with an increase in CRP were at higher risk for lung cancer than men with low CRP and high CRF may reduce the risk.
PubMed ID
26008754 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular health among Canada's aboriginal populations: a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123171
Source
Heart Lung Circ. 2012 Oct;21(10):618-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
T Kue Young
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. kue.young@utoronto.ca
Source
Heart Lung Circ. 2012 Oct;21(10):618-22
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism - therapy
Delivery of Health Care
Humans
Inuits
Risk factors
PubMed ID
22726402 View in PubMed
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Copeptin, a marker of vasopressin, in abdominal obesity, diabetes and microalbuminuria: the prospective Malmö Diet and Cancer Study cardiovascular cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124172
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Apr;37(4):598-603
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
S. Enhörning
L. Bankir
N. Bouby
J. Struck
B. Hedblad
M. Persson
N G Morgenthaler
P M Nilsson
O. Melander
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Clinical Research Center (CRC), Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Apr;37(4):598-603
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albuminuria - epidemiology - metabolism
Arginine Vasopressin - metabolism
Biological Markers - metabolism
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - metabolism
Female
Glycopeptides - metabolism
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - metabolism
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - metabolism
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology - metabolism
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
High plasma copeptin (copeptin), the C-terminal fragment of arginine vasopressin pro-hormone, has been associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS), diabetes mellitus (DM) development and nephropathy. Here we tested whether elevated copeptin level is associated with later development of the MetS, its individual components and microalbuminuria.
We analysed copeptin at baseline (1991-1994) in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer Study cardiovasular cohort and re-examined 2064 subjects 15.8 years later (mean age 72.8 years, 59% women) with oral glucose tolerance test and measurement of MetS and its individual components.
After age and sex adjustment, increasing quartiles of copeptin at baseline (the lowest quartile as reference) were associated with MetS (P for trend=0.008), incident abdominal obesity (P for trend=0.002), DM (P for trend=0.001) and microalbuminuria (P for trend=0.002). After additional adjustment for all the MetS components at baseline, increasing copeptin quartiles predicted incident abdominal obesity (odds ratios 1.55, 1.30 and 1.59; P for trend=0.04), DM (odds ratios 1.18, 1.32 and 1.46; P for trend=0.04) and microalbuminuria (odds ratios 1.05, 1.08 and 1.65; P for trend=0.02) but not MetS (P for trend=0.19) at the reexamination. Further, the relationship between copeptin and microalbuminuria was independent of baseline C-reactive protein, incident DM and incident hypertension.
Copeptin independently predicts DM and abdominal obesity but not the cluster of MetS. Apart from predicting DM and abdominal obesity, elevated copeptin signals increased risk of microalbuminuria. Interestingly, the association between copeptin and later microalbuminuria was independent of both prevalent and incident DM and hypertension. Our findings suggest a relationship between a dysregulated vasopressin system and cardiometabolic risk, which could have implications for risk assessment and novel preventive treatments.
PubMed ID
22614056 View in PubMed
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Distribution of adipose tissue in relation to cardiovascular and total mortality as observed during 20 years in a prospective population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103524
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1990;10 Suppl 1:S185-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

The Glostrup population studies. Collection of epidemiologic tables. Reference values for use in cardiovascular population studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245041
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1981;20:1-112
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981

Health 2000 score - development and validation of a novel cardiovascular risk score.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284024
Source
Ann Med. 2016 Sep;48(6):403-409
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Jouni K Johansson
Pauli J Puukka
Teemu J Niiranen
Juha Varis
Markku Peltonen
Veikko Salomaa
Antti M Jula
Source
Ann Med. 2016 Sep;48(6):403-409
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous risk scores for predicting myocardial infarctions and strokes have mainly been based on conventional risk factors. We aimed to develop a novel improved risk score that would incorporate other widely available clinical variables for predicting the broadest range of endpoints, including revascularizations.
A nationwide sample of 5843 Finns underwent a clinical examination in 2000-2001. The participants were followed for a median of 11.2 years for incident cardiovascular events. Model discrimination and calibration were assessed and internal validation was performed.
Sex, age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, smoking status, parental death from cardiovascular disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, hemoglobin A1c, and educational level remained significant predictors of cardiovascular events (p?=?0.005 for all). The share of participants with =10% estimated cardiovascular risk was 28.9%, 18.5%, 36.9% and 23.8% with the Health 2000, Finrisk, Framingham and Reynolds risk scores. The Health 2000 score (c-statistic: 0.850) showed superior discrimination to the Framingham (c-statistic improvement: 0.021) and Reynolds (c-statistic improvement: 0.007) scores (p?
PubMed ID
27187608 View in PubMed
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Impact of obstructive sleep apnea and sleepiness on metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73042
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1995 Jun;19(6):410-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
R R Grunstein
K. Stenlöf
J. Hedner
L. Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Sahlgrens University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1995 Jun;19(6):410-8
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood - metabolism
Intervention Studies
Lipid Metabolism
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sleep - physiology
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - epidemiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood - metabolism
Uric Acid - blood - metabolism
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine if obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with cardiovascular risk factors and health status in subjects with severe obesity. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of epidemiological data. SUBJECTS: 3034 participants in the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) Cohort. Two sub-groups with a high and low likelihood for OSA based on questionnaire data were analysed in detail. MEASUREMENTS: General health questionnaires, anthropometric data including CT calibrated values for body fat distribution and lean body mass, blood pressure, fasting insulin, triglycerides, cholesterol, uric acid, glucose. RESULTS: Self-reported loud snoring and observed breathing pauses (high likelihood of OSA) was associated with increased frequency of WHO Grade 4 dyspnea, admissions to hospital with chest pain, myocardial infarction, blood pressure, fasting insulin, fasting triglyceride (women only), uric acid (women only) after adjustment for body fat distribution and other potential confounders. CONCLUSION: OSA may be another medical disorder which contributes to morbidity in severe obesity and is associated with some of the components of the metabolic syndrome observed in the centrally obese.
PubMed ID
7550526 View in PubMed
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[INSULIN RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME AS AN INDICATOR OF CARDIOVASCULAR RISK].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275683
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2016;94(3):189-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
A V Dontsov
L V Vasil'eva
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2016;94(3):189-93
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism - physiopathology - prevention & control - psychology
Cholesterol - blood
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Interleukin-6 - analysis
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
To study blood insulin level in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) with and without metabolic syndrome (MS) and its relation to cardiovascular risk factors.
We examined 127 patients with stable coronary heart disease (mean age 59.4 ± 5.7 yr) including 63 with MS and 64 without it. The control group consisted of 80 practically healthy subjects. Bloods insulin was determined by immunochemoluminescence, glycated hemoglobin (HbA,) by immunoturbidimetry, total cholesterol, HDLP cholesterol and triglycerides by enzymatic colorimetric method, oxidized LDLP IL-l, IL-6, and tunour necrosis factor-a by enzyme immunoassay. The degree of depression was estimated using the Zung scale.
Blood insulin level in healthy subjects, CHD patients with and without MS was 6.3 (6.20;6.62), 15.5 (13.96, 16.3) and 9.5 (9.2, 10.1) mcIE/ml respectively (p
PubMed ID
27522723 View in PubMed
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N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide predicted cardiovascular events stronger than high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in hypertension: a LIFE substudy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168101
Source
J Hypertens. 2006 Aug;24(8):1531-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Michael H Olsen
Kristian Wachtell
Olav W Nielsen
Christian Hall
Ragnhild Wergeland
Hans Ibsen
Sverre E Kjeldsen
Richard B Devereux
Björn Dahlöf
Per R Hildebrandt
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. mho@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Hypertens. 2006 Aug;24(8):1531-9
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albumins - metabolism
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atenolol - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood - urine
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Creatinine - urine
Endpoint Determination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology - metabolism - urine
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - drug therapy - metabolism
Losartan - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
ROC Curve
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) are cardiovascular risk markers in various populations, but are not well examined in hypertension. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether high Nt-proBNP or hsCRP predicted the composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, non-fatal stroke or non-fatal myocardial infarction independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and the urine albumin: creatinine ratio (UACR), which is a well established cardiovascular risk factor in hypertension.
In 945 hypertensive patients from the LIFE study with electrocardiographic left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, we measured traditional cardiovascular risk factors including electrocardiography, morning UACR, hsCRP by immunoturbidimetry assay and Nt-proBNP by immunoassay after 2 weeks of placebo treatment. During 55 months' follow-up 80 patients suffered a composite endpoint.
HsCRP as well as Nt-proBNP above the median values of 3.0 mg/l and 170 pg/ml, respectively, was associated with a higher incidence of composite endpoint (13.1 versus 3.8%, P
PubMed ID
16877955 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.