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57 records – page 1 of 6.

An analysis of the Ontario Health Survey from a cardiovascular perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219521
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1994;5(3):7-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
R. Kirk-Gardner
D. Steven
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1994;5(3):7-14
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
The Ontario Health Survey was conducted in 1990 by the Ontario Ministry of Health to assess the health status of the province's population. Self reports of health status and problems, treatment, and risk factor profiles were collected by interviewer and self-completed questionnaires. The present report addresses the prevalence and distribution patterns of cardiovascular disease and selected risk factors and is based on data from 44,000 residents of Ontario aged 18 years and older. Data collected from the survey demonstrate that the incidence of circulatory disease was 3% and heart disease was 4% in the population of Ontario. As well, the prevalence rates for selected cardiovascular risk factors were: high blood pressure (10%), diabetes (3%), smoking (31%), obesity (25%), and inactivity (72%) and are reported as a function of age category and sex. These findings are compared with the prevalence of risk factors in other regions of Canada. This information provides a basis for the development, implementation, and evaluation of comprehensive programs that are aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk factors and mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease.
PubMed ID
7741974 View in PubMed
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Are cardiovascular risk factors still predictive in the elderly? The longitudinal study of epidemiology of aging in Copenhagen County, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50032
Source
Aging (Milano). 1998 Apr;10(2):167-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998

[A search for novel pathways of effective prevention of cardiovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: advance trial].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158900
Source
Kardiologiia. 2007;47(10):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007

The burden of blood pressure: where are we and where should we go?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196246
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Dec;16(12):1483-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
P. Hamet
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM), Montréal, Canada. pavel.hamet@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Dec;16(12):1483-7
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Cost of Illness
Diastole
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Systole
Abstract
Hypertension and related diseases are a global burden of cardiovascular disorders. Ischemic heart disease and cardiovascular disease rank fourth and fifth among the 10 leading causes of mortality worldwide. A generation from now, these diseases will be an epidemic for which we should be ready and against which we should attempt to find the best preventive measures. In Canada, the percentage of cardiovascular deaths increases with age. After the age of 50 years, these deaths actually exceed 50% of total mortality. Cardiovascular diseases also have the highest financial health care costs. The newest guidelines from national and international societies have a unifying goal of controlling cardiovascular burden. Guidelines of the international societies are written for a worldwide audience, including countries with very variable health care systems. However, the supreme goal is universal - to lower blood pressure and other risk factors to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease with its fatal consequences.
PubMed ID
11137913 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: research in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101718
Source
Noise Health. 2011 May-Jun;13(52):212-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gösta Bluhm
Charlotta Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Nobels väg 13, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. gosta.bluhm@ki.se
Source
Noise Health. 2011 May-Jun;13(52):212-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Automobiles
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
City Planning
Humans
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Public Policy
Railroads
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In Sweden, as in many other European countries, traffic noise is an important environmental health issue. At present, almost two million people are exposed to average noise levels exceeding the outdoor national guideline value (55 dB(A)). Despite efforts to reduce the noise burden, noise-related health effects, such as annoyance and sleep disturbances, are increasing. The scientific interest regarding more serious health effects related to the cardiovascular system is growing, and several experimental and epidemiological studies have been performed or are ongoing. Most of the studies on cardiovascular outcomes have been related to noise from road or aircraft traffic. Few studies have included railway noise. The outcomes under study include morning saliva cortisol, treatment for hypertension, self-reported hypertension, and myocardial infarction. The Swedish studies on road traffic noise support the hypothesis of an association between long-term noise exposure and cardiovascular disease. However, the magnitude of effect varies between the studies and has been shown to depend on factors such as sex, number of years at residence, and noise annoyance. Two national studies have been performed on the cardiovascular effects of aircraft noise exposure. The first one, a cross-sectional study assessing self-reported hypertension, has shown a 30% risk increase per 5 dB(A) noise increase. The second one, which to our knowledge is the first longitudinal study assessing the cumulative incidence of hypertension, found a relative risk (RR) of 1.10 (95% CI 1.01 - 1.19) per 5 dB(A) noise increase. No associations have been found between railway noise and cardiovascular diseases. The findings regarding noise-related health effects and their economic consequences should be taken into account in future noise abatement policies and community planning.
PubMed ID
21537104 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular events in subgroups of patients during primary treatment of hypertension with candesartan or losartan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101819
Source
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2011 Mar;13(3):189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
David Russell
Jan Stålhammar
Johan Bodegard
Pål Hasvold
Marcus Thuresson
Sverre E Kjeldsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. david.russell@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2011 Mar;13(3):189-97
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Benzimidazoles - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Cardiovascular System - drug effects
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Losartan - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Propensity Score
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sweden - epidemiology
Tetrazoles - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
Merging data from existing electronic patient records, and electronic hospital discharge and cause of death registers, is a fast and relatively inexpensive method for comparing different treatments with regard to clinical outcome. This study compared the effects of antihypertensive treatment with candesartan or losartan on cardiovascular disease (CVD) using Swedish registers. Patients without previous CVD who were prescribed candesartan (n=7329) or losartan (n=6771) for hypertension during 1999-2007 at 72 Swedish primary care centers were followed for up to 9 years. Both medications were given according to current recommendations, and there was no difference observed in achieved blood pressures. The authors have previously shown that candesartan lowered the risk of all CVD (primary composite end point) more so than losartan (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-0.96). Candesartan also had a significantly better effect with regards to reducing the development of heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, and peripheral arterial disease. In the present analysis, the authors found that candesartan, compared with losartan, reduced the risk of all CVD, irrespective of sex, age, previous antihypertensive treatment, baseline blood pressure, and presence of diabetes. These clinical findings may reflect differences between candesartan and losartan in their binding characteristics to the angiotensin type 1 receptor.
PubMed ID
21366850 View in PubMed
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[Cardiovascular risk factors in persons aged 40-42 years in the county of Hedmark 1988-94]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54501
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jun 20;117(16):2325-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1997
Author
A. Sandvig
S. Hewitt
G. Wøien
S. Graff-Iversen
L. Lien
Author Affiliation
Statens helseundersøkeiser, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jun 20;117(16):2325-8
Date
Jun-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Specimen Collection
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Prevention
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We present the results from three surveys conducted in 1988, 1991 and 1994 in Hedmark comparing risk factors for cardiovascular disease among men and women age 40-42 years. The data are compared with the results for persons in the same age group from the counties Vestfold, Rogaland and Nordland, and examined in the same periods. In 1991 the average levels of total cholesterol and infarction risk score were the same in Hedmark and the three other counties, but in 1994 Hedmark compared less favourably. While the mean levels of total cholesterol showed minimal difference between rural and urban municipalities in Hedmark, triglycerides and systolic blood pressure were higher in the rural areas. Adjustment of the results in Hedmark for lower attendance rate among unmarried, divorced and widowed persons in 1991 and 1994 than in 1988 does not affect other risk factors than smoking. We discuss possible explanations of the less favourable results and the implications for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases.
PubMed ID
9265277 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors: interactive effects of lipids, coagulation and fibrinolysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67807
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 1993;215:19-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
L N Daae
P. Kierulf
S. Landaas
P. Urdal
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 1993;215:19-27
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Coagulation
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Fibrinolysis
Humans
Lipids - blood
Mass Screening
Norway
Risk factors
Abstract
In western societies cardiovascular disease accounts for approximately one of every three deaths, and is a major contributor to chronic debiliation. During the last years our knowledge of factors that contribute to the development and progression of this disease has increased markedly. Elevated serum total cholesterol, hypertension and cigarette smoking are "traditional", well-known risk factors. In addition, low serum levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol predispose to development of disease, whereas in epidemiological studies the role of increased triglycerides is more controversial. During the last years derangements in several haemostatic components in persons who develop cardiovascular disease have been observed. Such alterations include increased plasma concentrations of fibrinogen, Factor VII coagulant activity and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Furthermore, interactions between lipoproteins and haemostatic factors are gradually being disclosed. Serum triglycerides have been shown to correlate both to PAI-1 and to Factor VII. The lipoprotein (a), first described by Berg in 1963, also appears to be a link between lipoprotein metabolism and fibrinolytic function. In addition, linkages are observed between high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, reduced glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, low physical activity, reduced fibrinolytic capacity and increased Factor VII. This clustering of risk factors has been suggested to be a coronary risk syndrome and has been called Reavens syndrome, syndrome X and insulin-resistance syndrome. A more descriptive name, athero-thrombogenic syndrome (ATS), has recently been suggested, thereby indicating that both atherosclerosis and thrombosis contribute to its development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8327848 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.