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1364 records – page 1 of 137.

A 1-year follow-up of low birth weight infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia: health, growth, clinical lung disease, cardiovascular and neurological sequelae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59584
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1992 Sep;30(2):109-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992

A 5-year follow-up study of disease incidence in men with an abnormal hormone pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47352
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
R. Rosmond
S. Wallerius
P. Wanger
L. Martin
G. Holm
P. Björntorp
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Institute, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Cerebrovascular Accident - epidemiology - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose - analysis
Humans
Hydrocortisone - analysis
Hypertension - epidemiology - metabolism
Incidence
Insulin - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have suggested that abnormal levels of cortisol and testosterone might increase the risk of serious somatic diseases. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a 5-year follow-up study in middle-aged men. METHODS: A population-based cohort study conducted in 1995 amongst 141 Swedish men born in 1944, in whom a clinical examination supplemented by medical history aimed to disclose the presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke), type 2 diabetes and hypertension were performed at baseline and at follow-up in the year 2000. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were measured repeatedly over the day. Serum testosterone concentrations were also determined. Using the baseline data, an algorithm was constructed, which classified the secretion pattern of cortisol and testosterone from each individual as being normal or abnormal. RESULTS: By the end of follow-up, men with an abnormal hormone secretion pattern (n = 73) had elevated mean arterial pressure (P = 0.003), fasting insulin (P = 0.009) and insulin : glucose ratio (P = 0.005) compared with men with a normal secretion pattern (n = 68). Body mass index, waist circumference, and waist : hip ratio were significantly elevated in both groups. However, the 5-year incidence of CVD, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
12974877 View in PubMed
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[8-year prospective study of acute cardiovascular pathology in an open population]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55641
Source
Ter Arkh. 1986;58(6):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
V V Gafarov
Source
Ter Arkh. 1986;58(6):45-8
Date
1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Age Factors
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Siberia
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Changes in the incidence of myocardial infarction, and associated mortality and lethality rates are reviewed over a 8-year period in an Novosibirsk district. Data on late postinfarction outcomes, obtained in a WHO-sponsored study, "Acute myocardial infarction register", are also presented. The incidence, mortality and lethality rates are showing a stabilization trend at present; in late outcomes, the greatest mortality and lethality rates fall to the first postinfarction year.
PubMed ID
3764714 View in PubMed
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A 12 year prospective study of circulatory disease among Danish shift workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82071
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Tüchsen F.
Hannerz H.
Burr H.
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. ft@ami.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the risk of heart disease after shift work reached different estimates and review authors disagree about the validity of some of the studies. A cross sectional study showed that shift workers had a higher prevalence of nearly every unfavourable work environment factor investigated. Conflicts at work and low decision latitude were more frequent among shift workers, and all-day walking or standing work and part-time jobs were more often found among female shift workers. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of circulatory disease in a prospective follow up of a representative sample of gainfully employed Danes, considering known or suspected confounding factors. METHODS: A cohort of 5517 people who were gainfully employed in 1990 were followed up for all hospital treatments due to circulatory diseases (390-458, ICD-8; I00-I99, ICD-10) from 1991 to 2002 inclusive. A log linear Poisson regression model was applied to control confounding factors and calculate the relative risk for 927 men and women working nights, evenings, or other non-day shifts compared to 4579 day workers. RESULTS: Non-day workers compared to day workers had a relative risk (RR) for all circulatory diseases of 1.31 (95% CI 1.06-1.63). Without control for BMI and smoking, the RR estimate was 1.33 (95% CI 1.07-1.65). For a subgroup of workers with at least three years' seniority, the RR was 1.40 (95% CI 1.09-1.81). The population based aetiological fraction of shift work was estimated to 5%. CONCLUSION: This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that shift work carries an excess risk of circulatory diseases.
PubMed ID
16735480 View in PubMed
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[20-year monitoring of acute cardiovascular diseases in population of large industrial city in West Siberia (epidemiological study)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54128
Source
Ter Arkh. 2000;72(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
V V Gafarov
Source
Ter Arkh. 2000;72(1):15-21
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
Urban Population
Abstract
AIM: To reveal trends in incidence rates of acute cardiovascular diseases (ACD) in a large industrial city of the West Siberia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Studies on WHO programs "Acute Myocardial Infarction Register" and "MONICA" have been performed in three districts of Novosibirsk. The diagnostic categories were detected without difference. The observation covered stable population of 500,000 residents aged 25-64 years. Trends in the myocardial infarction (MI) mortality, morbidity and lethality were analysed for 1977-1996. RESULTS: The above trends were stable except for 1986 when MI mortality, morbidity and lethality decreased and 1988 and 1994 when they went up. The reduction was due to 7-year prevention program while the rise was consequent to discontinuation of the preventive measures. Major risk factors of ischemic heart disease, according to screenings conducted in 1984, 1988 and 1994 remained at about the same level. Social stress closely correlates with a rise in MI morbidity and mortality. The latter in 1994 grew owing to higher rates of MI mortality and morbidity among the oldest men and females of different age groups. CONCLUSION: Urgent intensification of prophylactic measures is needed both at the populational level and the level of high risk strategy.
PubMed ID
10687199 View in PubMed
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[24-hr monitoring arterial pressure in outpatients with cardiovascular risk factors in the Far North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261133
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
V B Simonenko
K B Solov'eva
I V Dolbin
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Arterial Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
To study peculiar features of daily AP rhythm and profile in men with cardiovascular risk factors residing in the Far North.
The study included 115 servicemen divided into 3 groups (hypertensive disease (HD), hypertonic type neurocirculatory asthenia (NCA) and risk factor of cardiovascular diseases other than AH). HD was diagnosed based on multiple AP measurements and 24-hr monitoring.
HD was associated with elevated mean AP, load indices and AP variability All patients had pathological type of morning dynamics. Normal daily rhythm of systolic AP (SAP) was documented in 66.1% of the patients with HD and in 68% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. Normal daily rhythm ofdiastolic AP (DAP) was recorded in 63.5% of the patients with HD and in 72% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. In group 2, normal daily rhythms of SAP and DAP were found in 44 and 56% of the cases respectively.
Men residing in the Far North under conditions of anomalous photoperiod need medicamentous correction of AP regardless of AH type. Ambulatory BP monitoring should be preferred for the assessment of the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy.
PubMed ID
25696949 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of body mass index and cerebral atrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9325
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2004
Author
D. Gustafson
L. Lissner
C. Bengtsson
C. Björkelund
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. deb.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Date
Nov-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Atrophy
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cerebral Cortex - pathology - radiography
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the longitudinal relationship between body mass index (BMI), a major vascular risk factor, and cerebral atrophy, a marker of neurodegeneration, in a population-based sample of middle-aged women. METHODS: A representative sample of 290 women born in 1908, 1914, 1918, and 1922 was examined in 1968 to 1969, 1974 to 1975, 1980 to 1981, and 1992 to 1993 as part of the Population Study of Women in Göteborg, Sweden. At each examination, women completed a survey on a variety of health and lifestyle factors and underwent anthropometric, clinical, and neuropsychiatric assessments and blood collection. Atrophy of the temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes was measured on CT in 1992 when participants were age 70 to 84. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between BMI and brain measures. RESULTS: Women with atrophy of the temporal lobe were, on average, 1.1 to 1.5 kg/m2 higher in BMI at all examinations than women without temporal atrophy (p
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2005 Jun 14;64(11):1990-1; author reply 1990-115955971
SummaryForPatientsIn: Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):E19-2015557485
PubMed ID
15557505 View in PubMed
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30-Day Mortality after Cardiovascular Events in Persons with or without Alzheimer's Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274270
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(1):241-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jari Heiskanen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Risto P Roine
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(1):241-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemorrhagic Disorders
Humans
Male
Morbidity
Myocardial Infarction
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Proportional Hazards Models
Residence Characteristics
Stroke
Abstract
Persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been suggested to receive suboptimal treatment. We studied the 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or myocardial infarction in individuals with or without AD.
An exposure matched cohort of all Finnish community-dwellers diagnosed with clinically verified AD in 2005-2012 (n?=?73,005) and 1-4 matched comparison persons/AD-affected person (n?=?215,449). Data on 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke (n?=?16,419; deaths: n?=?2,748), hemorrhagic stroke (n?=?3,570; deaths: n?=?1,224), and myocardial infarction (n?=?15,304; deaths: n?=?3,804) were obtained from the National Hospital Discharge register. The main analyses were restricted to first-ever events.
Persons with AD had slightly higher 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke (adjusted HR 1.36, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.24,1.49), hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.98,1.25), or myocardial infarction (adjusted HR, 1.40, 9% CI 1.30,1.51). The associations were not affected by age, gender, or co-morbidities and remained similar when patients with previous ischemic strokes or infarctions were included. The absolute risk increase in 30-day mortality after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and myocardial infarction were 4.9% (95% CI 3.3,6.5), 3.3% (95% CI - 1.6,8.2), and 7.5% (95% CI 5.0,10.0), respectively.
Although the 30-day mortality was somewhat higher in the AD cohort, the absolute differences were small indicating that acute treatment was not notably inferior in AD patients. The slightly higher mortality was not explained by co-morbidities but may reflect the higher mortality of AD persons in general, or treatment practice of patients with severe cognitive impairment.
PubMed ID
26401944 View in PubMed
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A 40-year history of overweight children in Stockholm: life-time overweight, morbidity, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23563
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. DiPietro
H O Mossberg
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Digestive System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe the 40-year weight history and adult morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 504 overweight children, aged 2 months to 16 years, who were admitted for investigation of their overweight to four children's hospitals in Stockholm between 1921 and 1947. Follow-up information was gathered by questionnaire at 10-year intervals, most recently in 1980-1983 (n = 458), on weight history (based on the body mass index (BMI = kg/m2)), as well as prevalence of cardiovascular disease (n = 143), diabetes (n = 39), and cancer (all types (n = 20)), reported during the 40 years of follow-up, and mortality from all causes (n = 55), determined from death certificate. The sample of overweight children remained overweight as adults; after age 55 years, the BMI began to decline for both genders. Female subjects were heavier than their male counterparts from postpuberty onward. Subjects who died by the 40-year follow-up and those reporting cardiovascular disease were significantly (P
PubMed ID
7812410 View in PubMed
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The 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part I - blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143445
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):241-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Robert R Quinn
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Raj S Padwal
Martin G Myers
Lyne Cloutier
Peter Bolli
Donald W McKay
Nadia A Khan
Michael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Daniel G Hackam
Steven Grover
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Finlay A McAlister
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Donna McLean
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Alberta. rob.quinn@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):241-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality of Health Care
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2008 to October 2009 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Changes to the recommendations for 2010 relate to automated office blood pressure measurements. Automated office blood pressure measurements can be used in the assessment of office blood pressure. When used under proper conditions, an automated office systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher should be considered analogous to a mean awake ambulatory systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher and diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher, respectively.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 63 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. To be approved, all recommendations were required to be supported by at least 70% of task force members. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20485688 View in PubMed
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1364 records – page 1 of 137.