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Addressing poor nutrition to promote heart health: moving upstream.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140561
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kim D Raine
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. kim.raine@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Aug-Sep;26 Suppl C:21C-4C
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body mass index
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diet therapy - prevention & control
Cereals
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Dietary Fiber
Energy intake
Evidence-Based Medicine
Fatty acids
Fishes
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Policy
Nuts
Obesity - diet therapy - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Vegetables
Abstract
Current dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention suggest dietary patterns that promote achieving healthy weight, emphasize vegetables, legumes, fruit, whole grains, fish and nuts, substituting mono-unsaturated fats for saturated fats and restricting dietary sodium to less than 2300 mg/day. However, trends in nutrient intake and food consumption patterns suggest that the need for improvement in the dietary patterns of Canadians is clear. Influencing eating behaviour requires more than addressing nutrition knowledge and perceptions of healthy eating - it requires tackling the context within which individuals make choices. A comprehensive approach to improving nutrition includes traditional downstream strategies such as counselling to improve knowledge and skills; midstream strategies such as using the media to change social norms; and upstream strategies such as creating supportive environments through public policy including regulatory measures. While the evidence base for more upstream strategies continues to grow, key examples of comprehensive approaches to population change provide a call to action.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20847988 View in PubMed
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Reliability and validity of the SmartDiet Canadian version questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145834
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jan;110(1):101-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Linda Wiens
Michael Schulzer
Charlene Chen
Karen Parinas
Author Affiliation
Centre for Cardiovascular Health, Gordon and Leslie Diamond Health Care Centre, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Linda.Wiens@vch.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jan;110(1):101-5
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diet therapy - prevention & control
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Measuring the outcomes of nutrition interventions in health promotion settings can be a challenge. Nutrition screening tools are often used to measure dietary patterns and nutrition intervention outcomes, but these tools may lack quantitative scoring methods. Using the SmartDiet questionnaire from Oslo, Norway, as a model, the SmartDiet Canadian Version questionnaire was developed to assess fiber and fat intake. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of this new questionnaire. In 2007, 54 volunteer subjects (63% men, mean age 68.3+/-9.7 years) were recruited from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program at Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Test-retest reliability was assessed by having subjects complete the questionnaire at recruitment and 1 month later. Intraclass correlation coefficients of reliability (ICC) for both fiber and fat intake were calculated. For fiber scores the ICC was 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.48, 0.79) and for fat scores the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.74 (95% confidence interval 0.59, 0.84). Validity was assessed by correlating the completed questionnaire at recruitment with a 3-day food diary. The daily fat and fiber scores from the questionnaire were correlated with the corresponding average daily fat and fiber scores from the 3-day food diary by means of the Spearman correlation coefficient. For fiber scores, Spearman rho was 0.53 (P
PubMed ID
20102834 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Dec 11;132(23-24):2600
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-2012
Author
Hanne Storhaug
Author Affiliation
Universitetet i Oslo, Norway. hanne.storhaug@studmed.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Dec 11;132(23-24):2600
Date
Dec-11-2012
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - diet therapy - prevention & control
Diet, Fat-Restricted
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Health promotion
Humans
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 19;133(6):61223552143
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 19;133(6):61323552146
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Mar 19;133(6):61223552145
PubMed ID
23338089 View in PubMed
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