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318 records – page 1 of 32.

[10,850 general practice consultations with elderly patients. From diagnosis-prescription-examination in Møre and Romsdal]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72639
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3980-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1997
Author
J. Straand
H. Sandvik
K. Rokstad
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for allmennmedisin, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3980-4
Date
Nov-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Over a period of two months in 1988 and 1989 general practitioners in the Norwegian county of Møre and Romsdal recorded all contacts with their patients. Participation was close to 100%. We report data from 10,850 surgery consultations with elderly patients (65 years and older). 60% of the consultations involved female patients, and 58% of the patients were 65-74 years old. New diagnoses were made in one-third of the cases; two-thirds were follow-ups. The most common groups of diagnoses were cardiovascular (28%), musculoskeletal (13%), psychiatric (8%) and respiratory diseases (8%). Almost 10% of all consultations were for hypertension. Drugs were prescribed in 45% of all cases. 27% of all prescriptions were for cardiovascular drugs, and 25% were for drugs for the nervous system. The 20 most common diagnoses made up more than half of the total number of diagnoses. Almost 70% of all prescriptions were for the ten most common therapeutic groups.
PubMed ID
9441427 View in PubMed
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[1384 house calls to elderly patients in family practice. From diagnosis-prescriptions-examination in Møre and Romsdal]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72638
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3984-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1997
Author
J. Straand
H. Sandvik
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for allmennmedisin, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3984-7
Date
Nov-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Over a period of two months in 1988 and 1989 all general practitioners in the Norwegian county of Møre and Romsdal recorded all contacts with their patients. We report data from 1,384 house calls to elderly patients (65 years and older). House calls made up 11.3% of all face-to-face contacts between general practitioners and elderly patients. 59% of the visits were to female patients, and 60% were to patients 75 years and older. 23% of the house calls took place during weekends, and new diagnoses were made in 58% of the cases. The most common groups of diagnoses were cardiovascular (21%), respiratory (16%), and musculoskeletal diseases (13%). Drugs were prescribed for 42% of the house calls. 28% of all drugs prescribed were for the nervous system, while 26% were antibiotics for systemic use. Most house calls were made because of acute illnesses. Our results suggest that preventive home visits to the elderly are rarely, if ever, performed in general practice.
PubMed ID
9441428 View in PubMed
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The 2001 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part one--Assessment for diagnosis, cardiovascular risk, causes and lifestyle modification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189435
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):604-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Kelly B Zarnke
Finlay A McAlister
Norman R C Campbell
Mitchell Levine
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Steven Grover
Donald W McKay
Martin G Myers
Thomas W Wilson
Simon W Rabkin
Ross D Feldman
Ellen Burgess
Peter Bolli
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Karen Mann
Carl Abbott
Sheldon Tobe
Robert Petrella
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital Campus, London, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):604-24
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk, identifiable causes and lifestyle modifications for adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, hypertension is diagnosed based on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases must be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons receiving a diagnosis of hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of concomitant vascular risk factors, including laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment for modifiable causes of hypertension. Home and ambulatory blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
The outcomes were: the identification of persons at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes; the quantification of overall cardiovascular risk; and the identification of persons with potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
Medline searches were conducted from one year before the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1999 to May 2001). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts. In addition to an update of the previous year's review, new sections on assessing overall cardiovascular risk and endocrine causes are provided.
A high value was placed on the identification of persons at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and of persons with identifiable causes of hypertension.
The identification of persons at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counseling for lifestyle manoeuvres and introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. The identification of specific causes of hypertension may permit the use of cause-specific interventions. In certain subgroups of patients, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity or mortality.
The present document contains recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk, identifiable causes and lifestyle modifications for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the role of echocardiography and lifestyle modifications.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only those recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These guidelines are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada.
PubMed ID
12107419 View in PubMed
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[About All-Russia Congress "Pediatric Cardiology 2002", Moscow, May 29-31, 2002].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184113
Source
Kardiologiia. 2003;43(3):82-3
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2003

The accuracy of predicting cardiovascular death based on one compared to several albuminuria values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260540
Source
Kidney Int. 2014 Jun;85(6):1421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Gudrun Hatlen
Solfrid Romundstad
Stein I Hallan
Source
Kidney Int. 2014 Jun;85(6):1421-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albumins - metabolism
Albuminuria - diagnosis - mortality - urine
Biological Markers - urine
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - mortality
Creatinine - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Urinalysis
Abstract
Albuminuria is a well-documented predictor of cardiovascular (CV) mortality. However, day-to-day variability is substantial, and there is no consensus on the number of urine samples required for risk prediction. To resolve this we followed 9158 adults from the population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study for 13 years (Second HUNT Study). The predictive performance of models for CV death based on Framingham variables plus 1 versus 3 albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was assessed in participants who provided 3 urine samples. There was no improvement in discrimination, calibration, or reclassification when using ACR as a continuous variable. Difference in Akaike information criterion indicated an uncertain improvement in overall fit for the model with the mean of 3 urine samples. Criterion analyses on dichotomized albuminuria information sustained 1 sample as sufficient for ACR levels down to 1.7?mg/mmol. At lower levels, models with 3 samples had a better overall fit. Likewise, in survival analyses, 1 sample was enough to show a significant association to CV mortality for ACR levels above 1.7?mg/mmol (adjusted hazard ratio 1.37; 95% CI 1.15-1.63). For lower ACR levels, 2 or 3 positive urine samples were needed for significance. Thus, multiple urine sampling did not improve CV death prediction when using ACR as a continuous variable. For cutoff ACR levels of 1.0?mg/mmol or less, additional urine samples were required, and associations were stronger with increasing number of samples.
PubMed ID
24352157 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of different approaches to identifying cardiovascular diseases in coal miners during medical selection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49975
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
L N Sizonenko
V V Cherkesov
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Date
Mar-1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis
Coal Mining
Comparative Study
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography
English Abstract
Exercise Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis
Personnel Selection - methods
Risk factors
Ukraine
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
An expert evaluation of identifiability of cardiovascular diseases was carried out together with a clinical and functional examination of certain groups of miners of basic underground occupations at different ages and lengths of service, that showed a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases along with a low informative value of methodical approaches, indices and criteria used for their diagnosis in conducting preliminary and periodic health check-ups. To improve the quality of diagnosis of diseases of the circulatory system it is necessary that standardized methods of investigation should be employed together with consistent indices of high informative value as well as a purposive training of physicians.
PubMed ID
10424067 View in PubMed
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Adjustment of apnea-hypopnea index with severity of obstruction events enhances detection of sleep apnea patients with the highest risk of severe health consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263489
Source
Sleep Breath. 2014 Sep;18(3):641-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
A. Muraja-Murro
A. Kulkas
M. Hiltunen
S. Kupari
T. Hukkanen
P. Tiihonen
E. Mervaala
J. Töyräs
Source
Sleep Breath. 2014 Sep;18(3):641-7
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polysomnography
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - classification - complications - diagnosis - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
Presently, the severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is estimated based on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Unfortunately, AHI does not provide information on the severity of individual obstruction events. Previously, the severity of individual obstruction events has been suggested to be related to the outcome of the disease. In this study, we incorporate this information into AHI and test whether this novel approach would aid in discriminating patients with the highest risk. We hypothesize that the introduced adjusted AHI parameter provides a valuable supplement to AHI in the diagnosis of the severity of OSA.
This hypothesis was tested by means of retrospective follow-up (mean ± sd follow-up time 198.2?±?24.7 months) of 1,068 men originally referred to night polygraphy due to suspected OSA. After exclusion of the 264 patients using CPAP, the remaining 804 patients were divided into normal (AHI?
PubMed ID
24390072 View in PubMed
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Advances in the development of genetic markers for the diagnosis of disease and drug response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18870
Source
Expert Rev Mol Diagn. 2002 Sep;2(5):411-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Eva Halapi
Hakon Hakonarson
Author Affiliation
Division of Inflammation and Pharmacogenomics, deCODE genetics, Inc., Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. evah@decode.is
Source
Expert Rev Mol Diagn. 2002 Sep;2(5):411-21
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - genetics
Central Nervous System Diseases - diagnosis - genetics
Genetic markers
Humans
Linkage (Genetics)
Molecular Diagnostic Techniques
Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Proteome
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Genetic diversity, including single nucleotide polymorphisms, contributes to both disease susceptibility and variability in drug response. Since most genes contain multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms, identifying those that are most relevant with respect to disease or drug response is important and may uncover variants that are predictive of either disease susceptibility or therapeutic response to drugs, both with respect to efficacy and toxic side effects. The candidate gene approach has been widely used to search for the genetic basis of pharmacogenomic traits. Although a few successful examples have emerged from this approach, notably trastuzumab (Herceptin; Genentech), imatinib mesylate (Gleevec (USA), Glivec; Novartis) and certain drugs that demonstrate variable efficacy or adverse effects that are attributed to metabolizing enzymes, for most drugs, the genetic variations that determine their clinical response remain uncovered. Genome-wide linkage approach presents an alternative to the candidate gene approach. The powerful combination of linkage when coupled to ultra-high-throughput genotyping, gene array and proteomics technology, together with innovative bioinformatic resources, provides a focused integrative strategy for pinpointing disease-causing genes that may generate validated drug targets and genes that are responsible for differential drug response. Thus, it is anticipated that genetic research will soon generate new information that can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies and diagnostic tests that will ultimately lead to safer and more efficacious drugs for all patients. This review addresses recent advances in the development of genetic markers that can be used to diagnose disease or drug response.
PubMed ID
12271813 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness thresholds to define poor cardiometabolic health in children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299130
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Eivind Aadland
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Lars Bo Andersen
Geir Kåre Resaland
Elin Kolle
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Sogndal, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Oxygen consumption
Reference Values
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Aerobic fitness is an apparent candidate for screening children and youth for poor cardiometabolic health and future risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Yet, age- and sex-specific cut points for children and youth determined using a maximal protocol and directly measured peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak ) does not exist. We used a nationally representative sample of 1462 Norwegian children and youth (788 boys and 674 girls aged 8.7-10.4 years and 14.7-16.7 years) who in 2005-2006 performed a maximal cycle ergometer test with direct measurement of VO2peak , along with measurement of several other risk factors for CVD (systolic blood pressure, waist circumference:height ratio, total:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, triglycerides, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance). Based on the proportion of children having clustering (least favorable quartile) of 6 (1.6%), =5 (5.2%), and =4 (10.6%) CVD risk factors, we established the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile cut points for VO2peak (mL/kg/min) for children and youth aged 8-18 years. Classification accuracy was determined using the Kappa coefficient (k), sensitivity, and specificity. For boys, the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile VO2peak cut points were 33.6-36.4, 36.3-39.8, and 38.7-43.0 mL/kg/min, respectively. For girls, the corresponding cut points were 29.7-29.1, 32.4-31.4, and 34.8-33.5 mL/kg/min Together with BMI, but without more invasive measures of traditional risk factors for CVD, these cut points can be used to screen schoolchildren for poor cardiometabolic health with moderate discriminating ability (k = 0.53).
PubMed ID
30375665 View in PubMed
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318 records – page 1 of 32.