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Associations between serum uric acid and markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in young adults. The cardiovascular risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122953
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):497-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Mervi Oikonen
Maria Wendelin-Saarenhovi
Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen
Niina Siitonen
Britt-Marie Loo
Antti Jula
Ilkka Seppälä
Liisa Saarikoski
Terho Lehtimäki
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Markus Juonala
Mika Kähönen
Risto Huupponen
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
The Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, P.O. Box 52, FI-20520 Turku, Finland.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):497-503
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asymptomatic Diseases
Atherosclerosis - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Biological Markers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemodynamics
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Predictive value of tests
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Uric Acid - blood
Abstract
Serum uric acid (SUA) is a suggested biomarker for established coronary artery disease, but the role of SUA in early phases of atherosclerosis is controversial. The relations of SUA with vascular markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, including carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT), carotid plaque, carotid distensibility (Cdist) and brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) were examined in 1985 young adults aged 30-45 years. In addition to ordinary regression, we used Mendelian randomization techniques to infer causal associations.
In women, the independent multivariate correlates of SUA included BMI, creatinine, alcohol use, triglycerides, glucose and adiponectin (inverse association) (Model R(2) = 0.30). In men, the correlates were BMI, creatinine, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, alcohol use, total cholesterol and adiponectin (inverse) (Model R(2) = 0.33). BMI alone explained most of the variation of SUA levels both in women and men (Partial R(2) ~ 0.2). When SUA was modeled as an explanatory variable for vascular markers, it directly associated with cIMT and inversely with Cdist in age- and sex-adjusted analysis. After further adjustments for BMI or glomerular filtration rate, these relations were reduced to non-significance. No associations were found between SUA and FMD or the presence of a carotid plaque. Mendelian randomization analyses using known genetic variants for BMI and SUA confirmed that BMI is causally linked to SUA and that BMI is a significant confounder in the association between SUA and cIMT.
SUA is associated with cardiovascular risk markers in young adults, especially BMI, but we found no evidence that SUA would have an independent role in the pathophysiology of early atherosclerosis.
PubMed ID
22749515 View in PubMed
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Blood lead as a cardiovascular risk factor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55076
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 1;136(9):1091-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1992
Author
L. Møller
T S Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 1;136(9):1091-100
Date
Nov-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lead - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Many epidemiologic and experimental animal studies support the hypothesis of there being a causal association between lead exposure and increased blood pressure/cardiovascular disease. This study includes 1,052 men and women from Copenhagen County, Denmark, who were examined in 1976 and 1981; in 1987, only the men were examined. Blood lead fell by approximately 40% for the men during the 11-year period and by approximately 30% for the women during the first 5-year period. There was a univariate association between systolic blood pressure and blood lead for both sexes in 1976, but it disappeared at the following examinations. For women, there was also a significant association with diastolic blood pressure, even after confounders were controlled for at the two examinations. Moreover, the authors found a significant univariate association between changes in blood lead and changes in systolic blood pressure from 1976 to 1987 in the males. All participants taking part in the study in 1976 were followed regarding hospital admissions and deaths throughout a follow-up period lasting for 14 years. There was a significant univariate association with total mortality, coronary heart disease, and cardiovascular disease. However, with regard to coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, the associations disappeared when confounders were controlled for. Blood lead was a significant predictor of total mortality after control for relevant confounders. This study supports the hypothesis of there being a weak causal association between blood lead and blood pressure, total mortality, coronary heart disease, and cardiovascular disease. The importance of this association is very modest for the individual, but the population attributable risk may be considerable.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Mar 1;139(5):543-48154481
PubMed ID
1462969 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease risk factors in a population-based sample of Norwegian children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90371
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2009;69(3):380-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Steene-Johannessen Jostein
Kolle Elin
Anderssen Sigmund Alfred
Andersen Lars Bo
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. jostein.steene-johannessen@nih.no
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2009;69(3):380-6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Blood pressure
Body Size
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to describe the distribution of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, and to evaluate the extent of clustering of CVD risk factors in Norwegian children and adolescents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A randomly selected cohort of 9-year-olds and 15-year-olds from all regions of the country was sampled. Of 2,818 subjects invited to participate, 2,299 accepted, giving an overall participation rate of 82%. RESULTS: Mean (SD) values for the main risk factors for 9-year-old and 15-year-old girls and boys were: total cholesterol (TC) (mmol/L) 4.49 (0.73), 4.37 (0.68), 4.19 (0.76) and 3.80 (0.69), respectively; triglycerides (TG) (mmol/L) 0.72 (0.33), 0.63 (0.32), 0.79 (0.32) and 0.82 (0.47), respectively; high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) (mmol/L) 1.70 (0.35), 1.79 (0.40), 1.61 (0.34) and 1.42 (0.30), respectively; systolic blood pressure (mmHg) 102.6 (7.7), 103.3 (7.7), 109.0 (8.8) and 115.3 (9.0), respectively; and homeostasis model assessment score (HOMA) 1.29 (0.83), 1.19 (0.78), 2.10 (1.37) and 2.14 (1.49), respectively. At least five risk factors were found in 11.1 (95% confidence interval (CI) 8.76 to 13.44) times as many participants as expected. A significant degree of clustering of CVD risk factors was found in 11.4% (95% CI, 9.8 to 13.0) of the study population, and these had mean Z scores of 1.24 (0.06) and 1.04 (0.08) for the 9-year-olds and 15-year-olds, respectively. CONCLUSION: This study presents national reference data on selected CVD risk factors in children and adolescents.
PubMed ID
19153936 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease risk profiles in inflammatory joint disease entities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290982
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2017 07 03; 19(1):153
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-03-2017
Author
Grunde Wibetoe
Eirik Ikdahl
Silvia Rollefstad
Inge C Olsen
Kjetil Bergsmark
Tore K Kvien
Anne Salberg
Dag Magnar Soldal
Gunnstein Bakland
Åse Lexberg
Bjørg-Tilde Fevang
Hans Christian Gulseth
Glenn Haugeberg
Anne Grete Semb
Author Affiliation
Preventive Cardio-Rheuma Clinic, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, PO Box 23, Vinderen, N-0319, Oslo, Norway. g-wibeto@diakonsyk.no.
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2017 07 03; 19(1):153
Date
07-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Psoriatic - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) have increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to compare CVD risk profiles in patients with IJD, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and evaluate the future risk of CVD.
The prevalence and numbers of major CVD risk factors (CVD-RFs) (hypertension, elevated cholesterol, obesity, smoking, and diabetes mellitus) were estimated in patients with RA, axSpA and PsA. Relative and absolute risk of CVD according to Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) was calculated.
In total, 3791 patients were included. CVD was present in 274 patients (7.2%). Of those without established CVD; hypertension and elevated cholesterol were the most frequent CVD-RFs, occurring in 49.8% and 32.8% of patients. Patients with PsA were more often hypertensive and obese. Overall, 73.6% of patients had a minimum of one CVD-RF, which increased from 53.2% among patients aged 30 to
Notes
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PubMed ID
28673314 View in PubMed
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Change in cardiovascular risk factors in relation to diabetes status: the Tromso Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135168
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Jun;19(3):551-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Josepha Joseph
Johan Svartberg
Inger Njølstad
Henrik Schirmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. josepha_joseph@yahoo.com
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Jun;19(3):551-7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence
Health Surveys
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate changes in cardiovascular risk factors over 14 years in relation to diabetes status.
The study is based on 10,327 subjects who attended the Tromsø Study in 1994 and were screened again in 2007-8. At baseline there were 79 prevalent cases, and 397 incident cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) were diagnosed between 1994 and 2008.
Cases with DM2 had decreasing levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol and blood pressure (BP) and increasing levels of triglycerides, body mass index (BMI), and anti-hypertensive treatment during 14 years of follow-up. Despite decreasing BP, more than 75% of the treated cases had BP above 135/80 at the end of follow-up. Similarly, less than 35% of incident cases using statins had low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) below the recommended threshold value of 2.6?mmol/l.
Despite greater relative reduction in cardiovascular risk factors among people with DM2 compared to those without, treatment targets were met in less than 50% of subjects with DM2. Thirteen percent reached the combined targets for glucose, BP and LDL-C control. This indicates a need for more effective strategies to control cardiovascular risk factors especially among individuals with DM2.
PubMed ID
21505026 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of multidisciplinary patient counselling in reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors through nonpharmacological intervention: results from the Healthy Heart Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181193
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;20(2):177-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
David R Simpson
Barbara G Dixon
Peter Bolli
Author Affiliation
The Niagara Clinical Teaching and Research Centre, Hotel Dieu Health Sciences Hospital, St Catharines, Ontario.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;20(2):177-86
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Counseling
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Statistics as Topic
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The value of lifestyle modification in reducing physiological cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors remains controversial because changes in patient behaviour following CVD prevention counseling have failed to correlate with or impact reductions in physiological variables.
To determine whether nonpharmacological CVD prevention counselling significantly reduces behavioural and physiological risk factors, and to examine correlations between changes in these variables.
At baseline, dyslipidemic individuals with or at risk of developing CVD completed CVD risk factor questionnaires. At baseline and three months, participants submitted dietary logs, self-classified their readiness for behaviour change for eight lifestyles, and had their blood lipid profiles, weight and height assessed. Following CVD risk factor screening, lower and higher risk participants were recommended for multidisciplinary group counselling (GC) or group plus individual counselling (GIC), respectively. A prospective time series design assessed behavioural and physiological risk factor changes.
Participants progressed forward (P
PubMed ID
15010741 View in PubMed
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Endothelial function and circulating biomarkers are disturbed in women and children after preeclampsia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134259
Source
Hypertension. 2011 Jul;58(1):63-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Anne Stine Kvehaugen
Ralf Dechend
Heidi Bente Ramstad
Rebecca Troisi
Drude Fugelseth
Anne Cathrine Staff
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Hypertension. 2011 Jul;58(1):63-9
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Endothelium, Vascular - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Postpartum Period - physiology
Pre-Eclampsia - blood - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Vascular Resistance - physiology
Abstract
Preeclampsia is a long-term cardiovascular risk factor for the mother and possibly the offspring. Preeclampsia and cardiovascular diseases share common pathophysiological features, including endothelial dysfunction. We explored whether endothelial function, measured noninvasively, as well as circulating biomarkers reflecting lipid metabolism, angiogenesis, and inflammation, differed in paired mothers and offspring 5 to 8 years after delivery. Twenty-six mother and child pairs after pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia were compared with 17 mother and child pairs after uncomplicated pregnancies. In addition, we assessed whether concentrations of maternal circulating biomarkers at delivery predicted findings 5 to 8 years postpartum. We also included an assessment of early onset preeclampsia and specifically addressed the effects of small for gestational age. Endothelial function was significantly reduced in both mothers and children after preeclampsia when combined with a small-for-gestational-age infant compared with mothers and children after pregnancies without a small-for-gestational-age infant (mothers: P
PubMed ID
21606387 View in PubMed
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High serum insulin, insulin resistance and their associations with cardiovascular risk factors. The northern Sweden MONICA population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220363
Source
J Intern Med. 1993 Sep;234(3):263-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
B. Lindahl
K. Asplund
G. Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Research, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1993 Sep;234(3):263-70
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of insulin resistance and high serum insulin levels and to investigate their relationship to other cardiovascular risk factors.
Cross-sectional cardiovascular risk factor survey.
Northern Sweden.
A subsample of the population-based Northern Sweden MONICA Study. This subsample underwent an oral glucose tolerance test after an overnight fast, and consisted of 354 men and 404 women in the 25-64-year age range.
Delineation of low insulin sensitivity and high serum insulin by the diagnostic test technique, prevalence of these variables and their associations with cardiovascular risk factors.
The participants were classified into four subgroups by an insulin sensitivity index and fasting serum insulin. The combination of low insulin sensitivity and high serum insulin was present in 17% of the male and in 18% of the female 25-64-year-old population. In both sexes this combination was closely associated (P
PubMed ID
8354976 View in PubMed
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Lifetime risk factors and arterial pulse wave velocity in adulthood: the cardiovascular risk in young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146008
Source
Hypertension. 2010 Mar;55(3):806-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Heikki Aatola
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Markus Juonala
Jorma S A Viikari
Janne Hulkkonen
Tomi Laitinen
Leena Taittonen
Terho Lehtimäki
Olli T Raitakari
Mika Kähönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Tampere University Hospital, PO Box 2000, FI-33521 Tampere, Finland.
Source
Hypertension. 2010 Mar;55(3):806-11
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Blood glucose
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Elasticity
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insulin - blood
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pulsatile Flow - physiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Limited and partly controversial data are available regarding the relationship of arterial pulse wave velocity and childhood cardiovascular risk factors. We studied how risk factors identified in childhood and adulthood predict pulse wave velocity assessed in adulthood. The study cohort consisted of 1691 white adults aged 30 to 45 years who had risk factor data available since childhood. Pulse wave velocity was assessed noninvasively by whole-body impedance cardiography. The number of conventional childhood and adulthood risk factors (extreme quintiles for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, and smoking) was directly associated with pulse wave velocity in adulthood (P=0.005 and P
PubMed ID
20083727 View in PubMed
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Sedentary behaviour, visceral fat accumulation and cardiometabolic risk in adults: a 6-year longitudinal study from the Quebec Family Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117182
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54225
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Travis J Saunders
Mark S Tremblay
Jean-Pierre Després
Claude Bouchard
Angelo Tremblay
Jean-Philippe Chaput
Author Affiliation
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. tsaunders@cheo.on.ca
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54225
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Intra-Abdominal Fat - physiopathology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Quebec
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Subcutaneous Fat, Abdominal - physiopathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Sedentary behaviour has recently emerged as a unique risk factor for chronic disease morbidity and mortality. One factor that may explain this relationship is visceral adiposity, which is prospectively associated with increased cardiometabolic risk and mortality. The objective of the present study was to determine whether sedentary behaviour was associated with increased accumulation of visceral fat or other deleterious changes in cardiometabolic risk over a 6-year follow-up period among adult participants in the Quebec Family Study.
The current study included 123 men and 153 women between the ages of 18 and 65. Total sedentary time and physical activity were assessed by self-report questionnaire. Cross-sectional areas of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue were assessed using computed tomography. Cardiometabolic biomarkers including fasting insulin, glucose, blood lipids, HOMA-Insulin Resistance, and oral glucose tolerance were also measured. All variables of interest were collected at both baseline and follow-up.
After adjustment for age, sex, baseline BMI, physical activity, energy intake, smoking, education, income and menopausal status, baseline sedentary behaviour was not associated with changes in visceral adiposity or any other marker of cardiometabolic risk. In the longitudinal model which adjusted for all studied covariates, every 15-minute increase in sedentary behaviour from baseline to follow-up was associated with a 0.13 cm increase in waist circumference (95% CI?=?0.02, 0.25). However, there was no association between changes in sedentary behaviour and changes in visceral adiposity or other markers of cardiometabolic risk.
These results suggest that neither baseline sedentary behaviour nor changes in sedentary behaviour are associated with longitudinal changes in visceral adiposity in adult men and women. With the exception of waist circumference, the present study did not find evidence of a relationship between sedentary behaviour and any marker of cardiometabolic risk in this population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23326600 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.