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A 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcome of everolimus-eluting versus sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in patients with diabetes mellitus (the DiabeDES IV randomized angiography trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275976
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2015
Author
Michael Maeng
Arvydas Baranauskas
Evald Høj Christiansen
Anne Kaltoft
Niels Ramsing Holm
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Per Thayssen
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Date
Dec-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - mortality - radiography
Coronary Stenosis - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Thrombosis - mortality - radiography
Denmark
Diabetic Angiopathies - mortality - radiography - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents
Everolimus - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - radiography
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Risk factors
Sirolimus - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We aimed to compare angiographic and clinical outcomes after the implantation of everolimus-eluting (EES) and sirolimus-eluting (SES) stents in patients with diabetes.
There are limited data on long-term outcome after EES vs SES implantation in diabetic patients.
We randomized 213 patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease to EES (n?=?108) or SES (n?=?105) implantation. Angiographic follow-up was performed 10 months after the index procedure and all patients were followed clinically for 4 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss at 10-month follow-up. Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, the need for target lesion revascularization (TLR) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, or TLR) at 4-year follow-up.
At 10-month angiographic follow-up, in-stent late lumen loss was 0.20?±?0.53 mm and 0.11?±?0.49 mm (P?=?0.28), and angiographic restenosis rate was 3.8% and 5.2% (P?=?0.72) in the EES and SES groups, respectively. At 4-year clinical follow-up, MACE had occurred in 22 (20.4%) patients in the EES group and 25 (23.8%) patients in SES group (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.47-1.49; P?=?0.55), with TLR performed in 6 (5.6%) and 10 (9.5%) patients in the two groups (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.21-1-58; P?=?0.28).
EES and SES had comparable 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.
PubMed ID
25640050 View in PubMed
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Brain natriuretic peptide-guided treatment does not improve morbidity and mortality in extensively treated patients with chronic heart failure: responders to treatment have a significantly better outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133323
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2011 Oct;13(10):1096-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Patric Karlström
Urban Alehagen
Kurt Boman
Ulf Dahlström
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden. patric.karlstrom@lj.se
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2011 Oct;13(10):1096-103
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Chronic Disease
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Heart Failure - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood - drug effects
Norway
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine whether brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)-guided heart failure (HF) treatment improves morbidity and/or mortality when compared with conventional treatment.
UPSTEP was an investigator-initiated, randomized, parallel group, multicentre study with a PROBE design. Symptomatic patients with worsening HF, New York Heart Association class II-IV, ejection fraction 30% decrease in baseline BNP value) vs. non-responders found improved survival among responders (P
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Heart Fail. 2011 Oct;13(10):1046-821873341
Erratum In: Eur J Heart Fail. 2012 May;14(5):563von den Luederer Tomas [corrected to von Lueder, Thomas G]
PubMed ID
21715446 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular co-medication among users of antiobesity drugs: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141182
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2010 Dec;32(6):752-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Merethe Omdal Amundsen
Bo Engdahl
Christian Berg
Hedvig Nordeng
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1065, 0316, Blindern, Norway.
Source
Pharm World Sci. 2010 Dec;32(6):752-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Obesity Agents - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Polypharmacy
Population Surveillance - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent patients using prescription antiobesity drugs (orlistat, sibutramine and rimonabant) used cardiovascular and antidiabetic drugs. An additional aim was to investigate whether such co-medication differed according to gender, age and amount of antiobesity drugs used.
Data were retrieved from the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD). All patients who had an antiobesity drug (ATC code A08A) dispensed from a Norwegian pharmacy between January 2004 and December 2007 were included in the study.
During the 4-year study period 83,717 patients had antiobesity drugs dispensed. One in three patients using antiobesity drugs had at least on one occasion used a cardiovascular and/or an antidiabetic drug concomitantly. A significantly higher percentage of men used antihypertensives (40.4 vs. 27.2%, P
Notes
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Cites: BMJ. 2007 Dec 8;335(7631):1194-918006966
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Cites: Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2009 Aug 15;66(16):1471-719667004
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Cites: Diabetes Care. 2003 May;26(5):1408-1212716797
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Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2008 Aug;58(553):548-5418682018
PubMed ID
20803315 View in PubMed
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Channelling of statin use towards low-risk population and patients with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114841
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2013 Sep;113(3):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Maria Rikala
Risto Huupponen
Arja Helin-Salmivaara
Maarit Jaana Korhonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. maria.rikala@utu.fi
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2013 Sep;113(3):173-8
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
This study based on nationwide comprehensive health registers analysed trends in characteristics of statin users in the whole community-dwelling population of Finland between 1999 and 2008. The annual number of incident users (defined as those purchasing statins for the first time ever) increased 1.6-fold from 50,125 to 78,058 and that of ongoing users (including continuous users and re-initiators) increased 4.6-fold from 114,091 to 521,211. The proportion of incident users without cardiovascular disease (CVD) or diabetes increased from 23.6% to 27.8%, while the proportion of those with diabetes increased from 15.7% to 19.5%. An increasing proportion of ongoing users had diabetes (from 13.8% to 22.8%). The proportion of ongoing users without CVD or diabetes remained below one-fifth; however, their number increased five-fold. Over the study period, there was an obvious shift towards prescribing of higher statin doses both among incident and ongoing users. In conclusion, statin use is expanding to individuals with low cardiovascular risk despite the fact that clinical guidelines emphasize interventions other than pharmacotherapy for this population. At the same time, statin use is increasingly targeted to patients with diabetes, a high-risk group that is likely to benefit from it.
PubMed ID
23574641 View in PubMed
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[Check list for the use of thrombolytics and other drugs in acute myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54104
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Feb 28;120(6):662-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2000
Author
A. Hovland
E W Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Nordland sentralsykehus, Bodø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Feb 28;120(6):662-4
Date
Feb-28-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Aged
Aspirin - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Drug Administration Schedule
English Abstract
Fibrinolytic Agents - administration & dosage
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Prospective Studies
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Thrombolytic Therapy
Abstract
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data on all patients with acute myocardial infarction who were treated in Nordland County Hospital in a six-month period in 1996 were analyzed retrospectively (137 patients). After the introduction of checklists for the treatment of such patients, we did a prospective six-month registration in 1997 (111 patients) in order to find out whether treatment and delay times had improved. RESULTS: The proportion of patients who received thrombolytic treatment did not change (28% in 1996 as compared to 25% in 1997). The in-hospital delay time before treatment did not differ before and after the introduction of a check-list (approximately 40 minutes in both periods). There was an increase in the use of intravenous beta blockers and aspirin. INTERPRETATION: The percentage of patients with acute myocardial infarction receiving thrombolytics in our hospital does not differ substantially from that of other hospitals in Norway.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 May 10;120(12):147510851948
PubMed ID
10806876 View in PubMed
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Clinical acceptability study of once-daily versus twice-daily micronized purified flavonoid fraction in patients with symptomatic chronic venous disease: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281972
Source
Int Angiol. 2016 Aug;35(4):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Alexander Kirienko
Djordje Radak
Source
Int Angiol. 2016 Aug;35(4):399-405
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - chemistry
Chronic Disease
Double-Blind Method
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Compounding
Female
Flavonoids - administration & dosage - adverse effects - chemistry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Russia
Serbia
Tablets
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Venous Insufficiency - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the clinical acceptability of two dose regimens of micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF): a single 1000 mg tablet once daily versus 500 mg twice daily in patients suffering from chronic venous disease (CVD).
In an international, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study, 174 patients (Clinical Etiological Anatomic Pathophysiologic [CEAP] class C0s to C4) were randomized to MPFF 1000 mg once daily or MPFF 500 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. Adverse events (AEs) were recorded in patient-kept diaries (weeks 0, 2, 4, 8) and leg pain was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS).
No serious AEs occurred. A total of 30 treatment-emergent adverse events (EAE) were reported (15 in each group). Three treatment-EAE in the MPFF 1000 mg group (constipation, dyspepsia, allergic dermatitis) were considered by the investigator to be related to treatment. All were of mild intensity and resolved when treatment finished. Both MPFF regimens were associated with a significant reduction in leg pain score with a reduction of 4.21 cm for MPFF 1000 mg once daily (P
PubMed ID
26576663 View in PubMed
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Clinical outcome after crush versus culotte stenting of coronary artery bifurcation lesions: the Nordic Stent Technique Study 36-month follow-up results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106024
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2013 Nov;6(11):1160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Kari Kervinen
Matti Niemelä
Hannu Romppanen
Andrejs Erglis
Indulis Kumsars
Michael Maeng
Niels R Holm
Jens F Lassen
Pål Gunnes
Sindre Stavnes
Jan S Jensen
Anders Galløe
Inga Narbute
Dace Sondore
Evald H Christiansen
Jan Ravkilde
Terje K Steigen
Jan Mannsverk
Per Thayssen
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Steffen Helqvist
Saila Vikman
Rune Wiseth
Jens Aarøe
Jari Jokelainen
Leif Thuesen
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: kari.kervinen@ppshp.fi.
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2013 Nov;6(11):1160-5
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - etiology
Coronary Thrombosis - etiology
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Finland
Humans
Latvia
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods - mortality
Prosthesis Design
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sirolimus - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the study was to compare long-term follow-up results of crush versus culotte stent techniques in coronary bifurcation lesions.
The randomized Nordic Stent Technique Study showed similar 6-month clinical and 8-month angiographic results with the crush and culotte stent techniques of de novo coronary artery bifurcation lesions using sirolimus-eluting stents. Here, we report the 36-month efficacy and safety of the Nordic Stent Technique Study.
A total of 424 patients with a bifurcation lesion were randomized to stenting of both main vessel and side branch with the crush or the culotte technique and followed for 36 months. Major adverse cardiac events-the composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization-were the primary endpoint.
Follow-up was complete for all patients. At 36 months, the rates of the primary endpoint were 20.6% versus 16.7% (p = 0.32), index lesion restenosis 11.5% versus 6.5% (p = 0.09), and definite stent thrombosis 1.4% versus 4.7% (p = 0.09) in the crush and the culotte groups, respectively.
At 36-month follow-up, the clinical outcomes were similar for patients with coronary bifurcation lesions treated with the culotte or the crush stent technique. (Nordic Bifurcation Study. How to Use Drug Eluting Stents [DES] in Bifurcation Lesions? NCT00376571).
PubMed ID
24262616 View in PubMed
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Concordance between discharge prescriptions and insurance claims in post-myocardial infarction patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168215
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Feb;16(2):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Cynthia A Jackevicius
J Michael Paterson
Gary Naglie
Author Affiliation
University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada. cynthia.jackevicius@uhn.on.ca
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Feb;16(2):207-15
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Clinical Pharmacy Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitals, Teaching - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting - statistics & numerical data
Male
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Ontario
Patient compliance
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
To assess the degree of concordance between the information (drug quantity, days' supply, and daily dose) recorded on hospital discharge prescriptions and what appears in a public drug insurance electronic claims database.
A retrospective chart audit of hospital discharge prescriptions with linkage to a prescription claims database was conducted. Three hundred and forty-five post-myocardial infarction patients discharged from an Ontario university-affiliated teaching hospital were included. The percentage of linkable records with perfect agreement between the written prescription and the insurance claim was our measure of concordance.
Seventy-seven per cent and 82% of discharge prescriptions were filled within 7 days, and 120 days post-discharge, respectively. Of those dispensed and that contained adequate information, concordance was perfect for days' supply, quantity, and daily dose for 70.7% (95%CI 67.9-73.4%), 65.9% (95%CI 63.2-68.7%), and 75.9% (95%CI 73.2-78.6%) of prescriptions, respectively. For cardiac drugs, which comprised the majority of filled prescriptions, concordance was greater for daily dose and days' supply than for quantity (75.7% [95%CI 72.7-78.6%] and 75.5% [95%CI 72.6-78.4%] vs. 65.3% [95%CI 62.3-68.4%]). Concordance varied by medication type.
Most hospital discharge prescriptions were filled within 1 week. Among the data elements studied, concordance between written prescriptions and insurance claims was greatest for daily dose. Concordance was greater for scheduled cardiac medications than for other medications.
PubMed ID
16862605 View in PubMed
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Dementia associates with undermedication of cardiovascular diseases in the elderly: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169022
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2006;22(2):132-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Minna Lopponen
Ismo Raiha
Raimo Isoaho
Tero Vahlberg
Hannu Puolijoki
Sirkka-Liisa Kivela
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 1, Turku, Finland. minna.lopponen@utu.fi
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2006;22(2):132-41
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Dementia - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Patient compliance
Population
Risk assessment
Abstract
To compare medication use in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease with and without dementia.
All inhabitants aged 75 and older in Lieto, Finland (n = 462, participation rate 82%).
Direct standardised assessments of dementia and cardiovascular diseases. Quantification of drug use by self-report and by prescription and drug container checks.
In multivariate analyses, the odds ratio for demented cardiovascular patients receiving any cardiovascular medication (use vs. non-use) was 0.31 (95% confidence interval 0.12-0.82). Compared to the non-demented, demented stroke patients were treated less often with antithrombotic agents (p = 0.041) and demented hypertensive patients less often with beta-blockers (p = 0.045).
Demented cardiovascular patients, even mildly to moderately demented, were prescribed fewer evidence-based cardiovascular medications than non-demented patients.
PubMed ID
16741361 View in PubMed
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[Duration of drug treatment in nursing homes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194072
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 May 10;121(12):1469-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2001
Author
H A Nygaard
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for geriatri, Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag Ulriksdal 8 c 5009 Bergen. harald.nygaard@isf.uib.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 May 10;121(12):1469-71
Date
May-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
This article deals with duration of and changes in drug treatment of nursing home residents.
The duration of the drug use of 117 permanently admitted nursing home residents was studied retrospectively in five small nursing homes. All presently used drugs were registered with information on whether they were prescribed at or after admission. The drugs were recorded according to the ATC system.
The median age of the residents was 87, the most frequent diagnoses were dementia (36%) and cardiovascular diseases (26%). There was a significant correlation between the number of drugs used and number of diagnoses (r = 0.35, p
PubMed ID
11449769 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.