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[A chest-pain-unit. A complement to the department of myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54659
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1835-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1996
Author
J. Herlitz
B W Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Kardiologidivisionen, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1835-6
Date
May-8-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - diagnosis
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Chest Pain - diagnosis
Coronary Care Units
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis
Sweden
United States
PubMed ID
8667815 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antecedents and characteristics of lean thinking implementation in a Swedish hospital: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117783
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2013 Jan-Mar;22(1):48-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Waqar Ulhassan
Christer Sandahl
Hugo Westerlund
Peter Henriksson
Marie Bennermo
Ulrica von Thiele Schwarz
Johan Thor
Author Affiliation
Medical Management Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. waqar.ulhassan@ki.se
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2013 Jan-Mar;22(1):48-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Efficiency, Organizational
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Case Studies
Personnel, Hospital - utilization
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Sweden
Abstract
Despite the reported success of Lean in health care settings, it is unclear why and how organizations adopt Lean and how Lean transforms work design and, in turn, affects employees' work. This study investigated a cardiology department's journey to adopt and adapt Lean. The investigation was focused on the rationale and evolution of the Lean adoption to illuminate how a department with a long quality improvement history arrived at the decision to introduce Lean, and how Lean influenced employees' daily work. This is an explanatory single case study based on semistructured interviews, nonparticipant observations, and document studies. Guided by a Lean model, we undertook manifest content analysis of the data. We found that previous improvement efforts may facilitate the introduction of Lean but may be less important when forecasting whether Lean will be sustained over time. Contextual factors seemed to influence both what Lean tools were implemented and how well the changes were sustained. For example, adoption of Lean varied with the degree to which staff saw a need for change. Work redesign and teamwork were found helpful to improve patient care whereas problem solving was found helpful in keeping the staff engaged and sustaining the results over time.
PubMed ID
23271593 View in PubMed
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Birnbaum LM, Filion KB, Joyal D, Eisenberg MJ. Second reading of coronary angiograms by radiologists. Can J Cardiol 2006;22(14):1217-1221.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161033
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 Sep;23(11):864, 924; author reply 924
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007

Boundary work and the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners in healthcare teams.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129343
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Jul;68(7):1504-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Kelley Kilpatrick
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Judith A Ritchie
Lise Lamothe
Diane Doran
Author Affiliation
Université du Québec en Outaouais, St-Jérôme,Québec, Canada. kelley.kilpatrick@uqo.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2012 Jul;68(7):1504-15
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - nursing
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Clinical Competence
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Licensure, Nursing - legislation & jurisprudence
Nurse practitioners
Nurse's Practice Patterns - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Innovation
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Abstract
This article is a report of a study of boundary work following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role in healthcare teams.
Acute care nurse practitioners enacting their roles in healthcare teams have faced a number of challenges including a mix of positive and negative views of the acute care nurse practitioner role from healthcare team members and acute care nurse practitioner roles crossing the boundaries between the medical and nursing professions. Understanding the process by which the boundaries between professions changed following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role was important since this could affect scope of practice and the team's ability to give patient care.
The study was conducted in two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in Canada. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. Data were collected from March to May 2009.
Participants (N = 59) described boundary work as a process that included: (1) creating space; (2) loss of a valued function; (3) trust; (4) interpersonal dynamics; and (5) time. The development of trust among team members was essential. The co-location of team members working on common projects, and medical and nursing leadership facilitated boundary work.
The micro-level processes of boundary work in healthcare teams have important implications for the development of full scope of practice for acute care nurse practitioners, effective inter-professional teamwork and the integration of new roles in healthcare systems. Future research needs to be undertaken in different contexts, and with patients and families.
Notes
Erratum In: J Adv Nurs. 2012 Jul;68(7):1672
PubMed ID
22117596 View in PubMed
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Cardiac EASE (Ensuring Access and Speedy Evaluation)--design of a single point of entry and a multidisciplinary team to reduce waiting times in the Canadian health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153640
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2008;21(3):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Tammy J Bungard
Marcie J Smigorowsky
Lucille D Lalonde
Terry Hogan
Evelyn Maier
Stephen L Archer
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2008;21(3):35-40
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration - utilization
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Hospitals, University - utilization
Humans
Models, organizational
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Patient care team
Program Development
Referral and Consultation - organization & administration - utilization
Remote Consultation - organization & administration
Time Management
Triage
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Out-patient cardiac consultation in academic group practices often lacks a coordinated intake process, making it difficult to perform prospective testing or to direct undifferentiated consultations to the cardiologist with the shortest waiting list. We created a programmatic approach, with a single point of entry to improve the efficiency of cardiology consultation, without departing from the Canada Health Act. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of Cardiac EASE.
PubMed ID
19086484 View in PubMed
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Cardiac rehabilitation services in Ontario: components, models and underserved groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121697
Source
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown). 2012 Nov;13(11):727-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter A Polyzotis
Yongyao Tan
Peter L Prior
Paul Oh
Terry Fair
Sherry L Grace
Author Affiliation
York University, Faculty of Health, School of Kinesiology and Health Science, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown). 2012 Nov;13(11):727-34
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Exercise Therapy - organization & administration
Guideline Adherence
Health Care Rationing - organization & administration
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based - organization & administration
Humans
Models, organizational
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Rural health services - organization & administration
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Cardiac rehabilitation programs develop in accordance with guidelines, but also in response to local needs and resources. This study evaluated features of Ontario cardiac rehabilitation programs in accordance with guidelines, emerging evidence and treating underserved populations.
In this cross-sectional study, all Ontario cardiac rehabilitation programs were mailed an investigator-generated survey. Responses were received from 38 of 45 (84.4%) programs.
Twenty-seven (71.1%) cardiac rehabilitation programs were located within a hospital. Twenty-four (63.2%) programs reported that they offer two sessions of exercise and education per week. Twenty-six (68.4%) programs offered an alternative model of program delivery other than on-site, with 10 (27.0%) programs reporting they tailored their programs to rural patients. Twenty-three (62.2%) programs provided services to patients with a noncardiac primary indication. Twenty-six (68.4%) programs systematically screened patients for depressive symptoms. Twenty-seven (71.1%) offered resources to patients postgraduation.
Most cardiac rehabilitation programs offered alternative models of care, such as home-based rehabilitation. Cardiac rehabilitation sites are well integrated within their community, enabling smooth postcardiac rehabilitation transitions for patients. Cardiac rehabilitation programs continue to offer proven comprehensive components, while simultaneously attempting to adapt to meet the needs of patients with other chronic diseases.
PubMed ID
22885529 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of the health status after percutaneous coronary intervention at a hospital with and without on-site cardiac surgical backup: a randomized trial in nonemergent patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98076
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2010 Apr;17(2):235-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Tor Melberg
Jan Erik Nordrehaug
Dennis W T Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. meto@sus.no
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2010 Apr;17(2):235-43
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - adverse effects
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Artery Disease - physiopathology - psychology - surgery - therapy
Exercise
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health status
Hospitals, Community - organization & administration
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prospective randomized trials comparing the coronary artery disease-related health status outcomes (changes in symptom grade, physical functional capacity and health-related quality of life) after percutaneous coronary intervention at hospitals with and without on-site cardiac surgical backup have not been reported earlier. METHODS: We randomly assigned 609 consecutive patients fulfilling pre-specified procedural low-risk criteria to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention at either a community hospital without or a regional hospital with on-site surgical backup. Five hundred and seventy-six patients completed the health status evaluation at baseline and at 6 months follow-up. RESULTS: At baseline, 91.4% had symptoms, and the mean (standard deviation) Canadian Cardiovascular Society's classification was 2.5 (0.9). The procedural success rates and the changes in health status measures were similar at the two hospitals. Overall there was a substantial relief of symptoms with a reduction in Canadian Cardiovascular Society's classification of 1.9 (1.2), increase in exercise time [1.4 (1.9) min] and reduction in use of antianginal drugs [0.6 (0.9) less drugs] at follow-up compared with baseline (all P
PubMed ID
20150814 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Decentralized care is the best one for patients with coronary disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55206
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Nov 13;88(46):3899-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-13-1991
Author
N. Rehnqvist
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för medicin, Danderyds sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Nov 13;88(46):3899-900
Date
Nov-13-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects - instrumentation
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Sweden
Waiting Lists
PubMed ID
1956217 View in PubMed
Less detail

The development of Partners for Health's integrated community pathway for postmyocardial infarction patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185979
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Mar 15;19(3):231-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2003
Author
Wendy Young
George Rewa
Peter C Coyte
Susan B Jaglal
Shaun Goodman
Michael Bentley-Taylor
Peter Fountas
Anup Gupta
Ari Levinson
Terri O'Connor
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and Home Care Evaluation and Research Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario. wendy.young@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Mar 15;19(3):231-5
Date
Mar-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Community Health Nursing - education - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Critical Pathways - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based - organization & administration - standards
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Management Quality Circles
Myocardial Infarction - nursing - rehabilitation
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
Partners for Health convened an interdisciplinary team to evaluate the quality of care received by cardiac patients. The team detailed the suboptimal postacute care of patients with ischemic heart disease. To solve the quality problems, a cross-sectoral team, using an approach that is in accordance with the American Heart Association's Scientific Statement on Pathways, systematically developed and implemented an integrated community pathway for myocardial infarction patients. The paper contributes to the literature on pathways by presenting the lessons learned from the authors' first-hand experience. The paper concludes with recommendations based on those lessons.
PubMed ID
12677277 View in PubMed
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.