Skip header and navigation

Refine By

99 records – page 1 of 10.

The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
Less detail

[About All-Russia Congress "Pediatric Cardiology 2002", Moscow, May 29-31, 2002].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184113
Source
Kardiologiia. 2003;43(3):82-3
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2003

Access to cardiac resources in Canada: who is responsible? Who is liable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202874
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Feb;15(2):153-5, 158
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
H E Scully
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Feb;15(2):153-5, 158
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiology Service, Hospital
Cardiovascular Diseases - therapy
Emergencies
Ethics, Medical
Hospital Departments
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Liability, Legal
Malpractice
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 1999 Oct;15(10):1085-810523473
PubMed ID
10079772 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A chest-pain-unit. A complement to the department of myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54659
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1835-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1996
Author
J. Herlitz
B W Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Kardiologidivisionen, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 May 8;93(19):1835-6
Date
May-8-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - diagnosis
Cardiology Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Chest Pain - diagnosis
Coronary Care Units
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis
Sweden
United States
PubMed ID
8667815 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adding point of care ultrasound to assess volume status in heart failure patients in a nurse-led outpatient clinic. A randomised study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271711
Source
Heart. 2016 Jan;102(1):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Guri Holmen Gundersen
Tone M Norekval
Hilde Haugberg Haug
Kyrre Skjetne
Jens Olaf Kleinau
Torbjorn Graven
Havard Dalen
Source
Heart. 2016 Jan;102(1):29-34
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiology Service, Hospital
Diuretics - administration & dosage
Drug Dosage Calculations
Female
Heart Failure - blood - drug therapy - nursing - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Norway
Nursing Service, Hospital
Observer Variation
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Peptide Fragments - blood
Pleural Cavity - ultrasonography
Point-of-Care Systems
Point-of-Care Testing
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Vena Cava, Inferior - ultrasonography
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
Medical history, physical examination and laboratory testing are not optimal for the assessment of volume status in heart failure (HF) patients. We aimed to study the clinical influence of focused ultrasound of the pleural cavities and inferior vena cava (IVC) performed by specialised nurses to assess volume status in HF patients at an outpatient clinic.
HF outpatients were prospectively included and underwent laboratory testing, history recording and clinical examination by two nurses with and without an ultrasound examination of the pleural cavities and IVC using a pocket-size imaging device, in random order. Each nurse worked in a team with a cardiologist. The influence of the different diagnostic tests on diuretic dosing was assessed descriptively and in linear regression analyses.
Sixty-two patients were included and 119 examinations were performed. Mean±SD age was 74±12 years, EF was 34±14%, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) value was 3761±3072 ng/L. Dosing of diuretics differed between the teams in 31 out of 119 consultations. Weight change and volume status assessed clinically with and without ultrasound predicted dose adjustment of diuretics at follow-up (p
Notes
Cites: Heart. 2007 Apr;93(4):476-8217005715
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Aug;14(4):286-9325122616
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2004 Oct;6(6):795-800, 821-215542419
Cites: J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2007 Jul;20(7):857-6117617312
Cites: Clin Cardiol. 2007 Jul;30(7):336-4117674378
Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 2009 Jan;27(1):71-519041537
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2008 Sep;1(5):595-60119356487
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 May 15;20(7):697-70215197422
Cites: Clin Med Res. 2009 Jun;7(1-2):21-3119251582
Cites: Am Heart J. 2009 Sep;158(3):422-3019699866
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Dec 29;55(1):53-6020117364
Cites: J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2010 Jul;23(7):685-713; quiz 786-820620859
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2010 Dec;19(23-24):3381-920964749
Cites: Eur J Echocardiogr. 2011 Feb;12(2):85-721216764
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Feb 19;377(9766):658-6621315441
Cites: Crit Care Nurse. 2012 Apr;32(2):20-32; quiz 3422467610
Cites: Heart. 2012 Jul;98(13):967-7322572046
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 Jul;33(14):1787-84722611136
Cites: Circulation. 2012 Jul 24;126(4):501-622825412
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2012 Sep 1;5(5):676-8222991286
Cites: Congest Heart Fail. 2012 Sep-Oct;18(5):272-722994441
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2013 Jan;6(1):16-2823328557
Cites: Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2013 Apr;14(4):323-3022833550
Cites: Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2013 Dec;14(12):1195-20223644936
Cites: Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Sep;15(9):956-6024866902
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Sep;21(11):921-416239975
Cites: Eur J Clin Invest. 2014 Apr;44(4):341-924397419
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2014;14:15625070529
PubMed ID
26438785 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A model for study of quality of myocardial infarction care. Distinct targets improve the care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54608
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Oct 16;93(42):3697-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-1996
Author
L. Forslund
T. Kahan
R. Nilsson
P H Norhagen
U. Adamson
Author Affiliation
medicinska kliniken, Trelleborgs lasarett, Karolinska institutet vid Danderyds sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Oct 16;93(42):3697-700
Date
Oct-16-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital - economics - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Leadership
Models, organizational
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1997 Aug 6;94(32-33):27159289568
PubMed ID
8965533 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amyloid heart disease mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53110
Source
J Intern Med. 2005 Sep;258(3):225-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
S. Mörner
U. Hellman
O B Suhr
E. Kazzam
A. Waldenström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Heart Center, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. stellan.morner@medicin.umu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2005 Sep;258(3):225-30
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amyloid Neuropathies, Familial - diagnosis - genetics
Cardiology Service, Hospital
Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic - diagnosis - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
DNA Mutational Analysis
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Point Mutation
Prealbumin - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the importance of transthyretin (TTR) gene mutations in explaining the phenotypic expression in patients diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in northern Sweden. BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is relatively common and often caused by mutations in sarcomeric protein genes. Mutations in the TTR gene are also common, one of which causes familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP), with peripheral polyneuropathy and frequently, cardiac hypertrophy. These circumstances were highlighted by the finding of an index case with amyloidosis, presenting itself as HCM. Initial rectal and fat biopsies did not show amyloid deposits. Later on, the patient was shown to carry a TTR gene mutation, and cardiac amyloidosis was confirmed by myocardial biopsy. Only then was a repeated fat biopsy positive for amyloid deposits. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Cardiology tertiary referral centre. SUBJECTS: Forty-six unrelated individuals with HCM and the index case were included. Common diagnostic criteria for HCM were used. The 46 patients with HCM were previously analysed for mutations in eight sarcomeric protein genes and the TTR gene was now analysed by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. RESULTS: One mutation in the TTR gene (Val30Met) was found in three individuals and the index case. CONCLUSIONS: Three of the 46 cases with HCM carried the Val30Met mutation, and were considered likely to have cardiac amyloidosis, like the index case. As a correct diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis is mandatory for a potentially life-saving treatment, TTR mutation analysis should be considered in cases of HCM not explained by mutations in sarcomeric protein genes.
PubMed ID
16115295 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A new tool for retrieving clinical data from various sources].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170496
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 23;126(5):605-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-2006
Author
Erik Waage Nielsen
Anders Hovland
Oddgeir Strømsnes
Author Affiliation
Anestesi- og intensivavdelingen, Nordlandssykehuset, 8092 Bodø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 23;126(5):605-7
Date
Feb-23-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Database Management Systems
Hospital Information Systems
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Software
Systems Integration
Abstract
A doctor's tool for extracting clinical data from various sources on groups of hospital patients into one file has been in demand. For this purpose we evaluated Qlikview.
Based on clinical information required by two cardiologists, an IT specialist with thorough knowledge of the hospital's data system (www.dips.no) used 30 days to assemble one Qlikview file. Data was also assembled from a pre-hospital ambulance system.
The 13 Mb Qlikview file held various information on 12430 patients admitted to the cardiac unit 26,287 times over the last 21 years. Included were also 530,912 clinical laboratory analyses from these patients during the past five years. Some information required by the cardiologists was inaccessible due to lack of coding or data storage. Some databases could not export their data. Others were encrypted by the software company. A major part of the required data could be extracted to Qlikview. Searches went fast in spite of the huge amount of data. Qlikview could assemble clinical information to doctors from different data systems. Doctors from different hospitals could share and further refine empty Qlikview files for their own use. When the file is assembled, doctors can, on their own, search for answers to constantly changing clinical questions, also at odd hours.
PubMed ID
16505871 View in PubMed
Less detail

99 records – page 1 of 10.