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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Cardiac tamponade and septic shock caused by viral infection in a previously healthy woman.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53100
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005 Oct;49(9):1384-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
J J Laurila
T I Ala-Kokko
H. Tuokko
H. Syrjälä
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology, Division of Intensive Care, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. jouko.laeila@pp.fimnet.fi
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005 Oct;49(9):1384-6
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - virology
Cardiac Tamponade - etiology - therapy - ultrasonography
Female
Humans
Influenza A virus - immunology
Influenza, Human - complications - virology
Intensive Care
Pericardiocentesis
Shock, Septic - etiology
Virus Diseases - complications
Abstract
A previously healthy woman was admitted to hospital after 'flu-like' symptoms for 5 days followed by acute intense abdominal and lower back pain. On admission she was found to be in severe shock and was transferred to the ICU. Echocardiography revealed cardiac tamponade, and pericardiocentesis was performed immediately. Thereafter her cardiovascular state improved, but she developed hypotension with low systemic vascular resistance and required vasoactive treatment for 4 days. Nine days after admission the patient was transferred to the ward, after which she recovered rapidly and completely. The cause of her illness was extensively screened. No underlying disease was found, and all bacterial cultures remained negative. Acute virus infection was confirmed by diagnostic elevations of antibody titers to Influenza A and adenovirus. Adenovirus was also isolated from her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.
PubMed ID
16146481 View in PubMed
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Cardiac tamponade as a terminal event in the hemolytic uremic syndrome in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5184
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1994 Dec;8(6):754-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
P E Birk
S. Chakrabarti
A G Lacson
M R Ogborn
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Children's Hospital of Winnipeg, University of Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1994 Dec;8(6):754-5
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Tamponade - etiology - pathology
Child
Fatal Outcome
Female
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - complications - pathology
Humans
Abstract
The case of a 6-year-old Inuit female with the epidemic form of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with myocardial involvement and probable cardiac tamponade is presented. This case illustrates the multisystemic nature of the syndrome, and to our knowledge, cardiac tamponade as a probable terminal event in HUS has not been reported previously.
PubMed ID
7696120 View in PubMed
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[Complications and side-effects of acupuncture]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53459
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Jul-Aug;(5-6):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
V D Musiienko
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Jul-Aug;(5-6):7-10
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Analgesia
Acupuncture Therapy - adverse effects
Blood Vessels - injuries
Cardiac Tamponade - etiology
English Abstract
Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Needlestick Injuries - complications
Peripheral Nerves - injuries
Pneumothorax - etiology
Spinal Cord Injuries - etiology
Viscera - injuries
Abstract
In the review of the literature, an analysis of complications and adverse effects of acupuncture is given, ways for their prevention are outlined.
PubMed ID
14618792 View in PubMed
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Coronary Artery Perforation and Tamponade - Incidence, Risk Factors, Predictors and Outcomes From 12 Years' Data of the SCAAR Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307811
Source
Circ J. 2019 12 25; 84(1):43-53
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-25-2019
Author
Jan Harnek
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease and Institute of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
Source
Circ J. 2019 12 25; 84(1):43-53
Date
12-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Tamponade - etiology - mortality
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - surgery
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects
Postoperative Cognitive Complications - mortality
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Spontaneous Perforation - etiology - mortality
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence and short- and long-term outcomes of coronary artery perforation (CAP) are not well described.Methods and Results:We analyzed the characteristics and the short- and long-term outcomes of CAP among 243,149 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) from 2005 until 2017 in the national Swedish registry. We identified 1,008 cases of CAP with an incidence of 0.42%. Major adverse event rates were significantly higher in patients with CAP than non-CAP (P
PubMed ID
31813890 View in PubMed
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Endometrial adenocarcinoma complicated by malignant pericardial effusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23300
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 1995 Mar;56(3):444-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
M. Santala
U. Puistola
A. Kauppila
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 1995 Mar;56(3):444-5
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - complications - secondary
Cardiac Tamponade - etiology
Endometrial Neoplasms - pathology
Female
Heart Neoplasms - complications - secondary
Humans
Middle Aged
Pericardial Effusion - etiology
Pericardium
Abstract
A case of malignant pericardial effusion associated with endometrial adenocarcinoma is presented. A total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and partial omentectomy was performed 8 months before the occurrence of cardiac tamponade. The treatment of malignant pericardial effusion consisted of emergency pericardiocentesis and systemic chemotherapy and a clinical response for 6 months was achieved.
PubMed ID
7705682 View in PubMed
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Perforation complications of percutaneous central venous catheters in very low birthweight infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194879
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 2001 Apr;37(2):168-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
J A Leipälä
J. Petäjä
V. Fellman
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. jaana.leipala@kcl.ac.uk
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 2001 Apr;37(2):168-71
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy
Cardiac Tamponade - etiology
Catheterization, Central Venous - adverse effects
Fatal Outcome
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care, Neonatal - standards
Intraoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pericardial Effusion - etiology
Pleural Effusion - etiology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
To prospectively survey perforation complications of consecutively inserted percutaneous central venous catheters (PCVC) in very low birthweight (VLBW) infants over a 2 year period.
Three serious perforation complications were encountered in a series of 100 consecutive PCVC. One infant (birthweight 685 g) developed pericardial effusion and fatal cardiac tamponade during the use of a polyurethane PCVC. At autopsy, the pericardial sac contained 8 mL fluid with a glucose concentration of 109 mmol/L and the catheter tip was embedded in the right ventricular wall. The second infant (birthweight 1380 g) showed pleural effusion and transient immobility of the right diaphragmatic leaf after perforation of a similar PCVC into the right pleural cavity. The third perforation, causing subcutaneous oedema, occurred in a 655 g infant who had a silastic PCVC.
The data suggest a 3% incidence for PCVC-associated symptomatic perforation complications and a 1% incidence for fatal perforations, despite a policy of careful placement. The data also indicate that perforation complications occur regardless of the size or material of the PCVC. Proper visualization of the PCVC and vigilant attention to its location is required to prevent these rare but potentially fatal complications.
PubMed ID
11328473 View in PubMed
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Pericardial effusion associated with metastatic disease from an unknown primary tumor in a dog.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20545
Source
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 2000 Mar-Apr;36(2):121-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J A Kirsch
S. Dhupa
K K Cornell
Author Affiliation
Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens 30602-7390, USA.
Source
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 2000 Mar-Apr;36(2):121-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cardiac Tamponade - etiology - veterinary
Diagnosis, Differential
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Dogs
Female
Heart Neoplasms - complications - secondary - veterinary
Neoplasm Circulating Cells - pathology
Neoplasms, Unknown Primary - complications - diagnosis - veterinary
Pericardial Effusion - etiology - veterinary
Abstract
A 6.5-year-old, spayed female Siberian husky presented with signs of cardiac tamponade and weakness. Pleural, pericardial, and abdominal effusion were identified with radiographs and ultrasound. Pericardiocentesis relieved signs of tamponade, and the dog was clinically improved. Pericardial effusion recurred, and pericardiectomy was performed. Histopathological examination of excised tissues failed to reveal evidence of infectious or neoplastic disease. After pericardiectomy, clinically apparent thoracic effusion persisted. The dog was euthanized, and postmortem histopathological examination revealed emboli of metastatic carcinoma cells in the epicardium. The location of intrathoracic disease in this dog made antemortem diagnosis difficult, if not impossible.
PubMed ID
10730621 View in PubMed
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Rheumatoid arthritis as a cause of cardiac compression. Favourable long-term outcome of pericardiectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14395
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 1993 Jun;12(2):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
M. Hakala
T. Pettersson
M. Tarkka
M. Leirisalo-Repo
T. Mattila
J. Airaksinen
S. Sutinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 1993 Jun;12(2):199-203
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications
Cardiac Tamponade - etiology - pathology - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intraoperative Period
Male
Middle Aged
Pericardiectomy
Pericardium - pathology
Prednisolone - therapeutic use
Preoperative Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In order to clarify the significance of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as a cause of cardiac compression, we scrutinized pericardiectomy files of 47 patients over a ten-year period at two university hospitals in Finland. Five patients with RA were found. All the patients with RA were men with seropositive disease and subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules. Two of the patients had pulmonary fibrosis, one had cutaneous vasculitis and three had had rheumatoid pleurisy. There was a mean delay of 10 months from the first cardiac symptom to the diagnosis of cardiac compression, the most common misdiagnosis being primarily a liver disease. On the basis of clinical and operative data, four out of the five patients had constrictive pericarditis and one had an effusive-constrictive form of the disease. The histopathological findings in all cases were consistent with chronic fibrosing pericarditis. A follow-up of seven to seventeen years of four patients has not revealed any signs of recurrent pericardial disease. Our results demonstrate that RA is an important aetiological factor for cardiac compression. The long-term outcome of this manifestation seems to be good after pericardiectomy.
PubMed ID
8358978 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.