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70 records – page 1 of 7.

Age-related changes of cardiac gene expression following myocardial ischemia/reperfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53445
Source
Arch Biochem Biophys. 2003 Dec 15;420(2):268-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2003
Author
Boris Z Simkhovich
Paul Marjoram
Coralie Poizat
Larry Kedes
Robert A Kloner
Author Affiliation
Heart Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital, Department of Medicine and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90017, USA.
Source
Arch Biochem Biophys. 2003 Dec 15;420(2):268-78
Date
Dec-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Apoptosis - genetics
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Comparative Study
Female
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation
Myocardial Ischemia - genetics - metabolism
Myocardial Reperfusion
Myocardial Reperfusion Injury - genetics - metabolism
Myocardium - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Signal Transduction
Transcription, Genetic
Abstract
Young and old (4 and 25 months of age, respectively) Fisher 344/Brown Norway hybrid female rats were subjected to four 3 min episodes of ischemia separated by 5 min of reperfusion. Corresponding open-chest sham-operated groups received 32 min of no intervention. All rats were allowed to recover, and 24h later hearts were removed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Global gene profiling in the ischemic and the non-ischemic areas and in the sham-operated hearts as well was carried out by using Affymetrix Gene Chips. Young ischemic hearts demonstrated down-regulation of gene expression associated with early-remodeling including down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1, decorin, collagen, tropoelastin, and fibulin, as well as decreases in hypertrophy-related transcripts. In contrast, old hearts showed a unique injury-related response, which included up-regulation of mRNAs for proteins associated with hypertrophy or apoptosis (including H36-alpha7 integrin, alpha-actin, tubulin, filamin, connective tissue growth factor, calcineurin, serine protease, and apoptosis inducing factor). These injury-related changes in gene expression could in part explain increased gravity of outcomes of ischemia and myocardial infarction in elderly hearts.
PubMed ID
14654066 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of mitral valve procedures using the European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155041
Source
Scand J Surg. 2008;97(3):254-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
T. Kaartama
L. Heikkinen
A. Vento
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2008;97(3):254-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Diseases - mortality - surgery
Humans
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study was undertaken in order to evaluate the usefulness of the Euroscore in the choice and outcome of mitral valve procedures undertaken at the Helsinki University Central Hospital.
Data from 378 patients was collected. predicted mortalities were calculated for all patients using the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation and different mitral valve procedures were compared with 30-day mortality, length of hospital care and rate of post-operative complications.
The mortality rate in the mitral valve repair (MVP) group decreased gradually from 5.9% (in 1999) to 2.2% (2003). The variation of annual mortality was higher in the mitral valve replacement (MVR) group. The predicted mortality given by Euroscore increased over the years in both groups. The mortality in the MVR group was nearly four times higher than in the MVP group. the length of both intensive and overall hospital stay decreased in patients with MVP procedures. Post-operative survival was 89% in the MVP patients and 74% in mvr patients after three years.
The results of mitral valve operations have improved. This is observed as decreased mortality rates and lengths of hospital care in the MVP group, although the predicted mortality rate was increased.
PubMed ID
18812276 View in PubMed
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Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121497
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):607-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gretchen Snyman
Joseph E L Tucker
Massimo Cimini
Kishan Narine
Paul W M Fedak
Author Affiliation
Master of Biomedical Technology Program, Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):607-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Leadership
Male
Organizational Innovation
Quality Improvement
Questionnaires
Abstract
Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada.
PubMed ID
22902159 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 1998 Sep;14(3):223-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998

Cardiac surgery for infective endocarditis in patients with intravenous drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284240
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2016 May;22(5):633-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Oda Bratland Østerdal
Pirjo-Riitta Salminen
Stina Jordal
Haakon Sjursen
Øystein Wendelbo
Rune Haaverstad
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2016 May;22(5):633-40
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods - mortality
Endocarditis, Bacterial - etiology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Staphylococcal Infections - etiology - mortality - surgery
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - mortality
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Intravenous drug users have a high risk of infective endocarditis and reduced survival. Cardiac surgery may be recommended for these patients, but redo surgery is controversial. This study describes the characteristics and outcomes of intravenous drug users accepted for surgery during a 12-year period.
This retrospective study included 29 injecting drug users treated with valve surgery for endocarditis between January 2001 and December 2013 at a tertiary academic centre. Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis.
The median patient age was 36 (24-63) years and 27 patients (93%) were male. Staphylococcus aureus (52%) and Enterococcus faecalis (17%) were the most common microorganisms. Common illicit drugs were opioids (69%), amphetamines (52%) and benzodiazepines (24%). Mixed abuse was reported in 66% of patients. Seven patients (24%) had prior intracardial implants or native valve pathology. Twenty-five patients (86%) were positive for hepatitis C virus antibody, but none carried the human immunodeficiency virus. Twelve (41%) were homeless and 15 (52%) had poor dental hygiene. Three patients (10%) received medication-assisted rehabilitation before surgery. The main indications for surgery were regurgitation and secondary heart failure (86%), embolization (41%) and uncontrolled infection (24%). Aortic valve replacement was performed in 24 patients (83%), either as part of univalvular or multiple valve surgery. Seven patients (24%) had multivalvular endocarditis. All but 3 patients received biological valve prostheses. The 30-day mortality was 7% after first time surgery. During follow-up, 15 patients (52%) presented with reinfection: 10 (35%) were offered a second and 2 (7%) a third operation. Thirty-day mortality was 10% after redo surgery. Thirteen patients (45%) died within a median of 22 (0-84) months. Continued intravenous drug use was reported in 70 and 44% of patients after the first and second operation, respectively.
Cardiac surgery for infective endocarditis has acceptable early postoperative results among intravenous drug users. The 2- and 5-year survival were 79 and 59%, respectively. The number of reinfections was high within 2 years, as continued drug use seems to be a major challenge for this group.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26826713 View in PubMed
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[Changed timing of heart valve operations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53795
Source
Duodecim. 1999;115(2):179-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
M. Ikäheimo
Author Affiliation
OYS:n sisätautien klinikka, kardiologian osasto PL 22, 90221 Oulu. markku.ikaheimo@ppshp.fi
Source
Duodecim. 1999;115(2):179-85
Date
1999
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods - trends
Echocardiography
Heart Valve Diseases - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Humans
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
PubMed ID
11830848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing mortality in congenital heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140551
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010 Sep 28;56(14):1149-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2010
Author
Paul Khairy
Raluca Ionescu-Ittu
Andrew S Mackie
Michal Abrahamowicz
Louise Pilote
Ariane J Marelli
Author Affiliation
Adult Congenital Heart Center, Montreal Heart Institute, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010 Sep 28;56(14):1149-57
Date
Sep-28-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aged
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
This study sought to characterize temporal trends in all-cause mortality in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD).
Historically, most deaths in patients with CHD occurred in early childhood. Notable advances have since been achieved that may impact on mortality trends.
We conducted a population-based cohort study of patients with CHD in Quebec, Canada, from July 1987 to June 2005. A total of 8,561 deaths occurred in 71,686 patients with CHD followed for 982,363 patient-years.
The proportion of infant and childhood deaths markedly declined from 1987 to 2005, with a reduction in mortality that exceeded that of the general population. Distribution of age at death transitioned from a bimodal to unimodal, albeit skewed, pattern, more closely approximating the general population. Overall, mortality decreased by 31% (mortality rate ratio: 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.61 to 0.79) in the last (2002 to 2005) relative to the first (1987 to 1990) period of observation. Mortality rates decreased in all age groups below 65 years, with the largest reduction in infants (mortality rate ratio: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.12 to 0.47). In adults 18 to 64 years, the mortality reduction (mortality rate ratio: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.73 to 0.97) paralleled the general population. Gains in survival were mostly driven by reduced mortality in severe forms of CHD, particularly in children (mortality rate ratio: 0.33, 95% CI: 0.19 to 0.60), and were consistent across most subtypes.
Deaths in CHD have shifted away from infants and towards adults, with a steady increase in age at death and decreasing mortality.
PubMed ID
20863956 View in PubMed
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Chronic pain in children after cardiac surgery via sternotomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263499
Source
Cardiol Young. 2014 Oct;24(5):893-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Mette H Lauridsen
Anders D Kristensen
Vibeke E Hjortdal
Troels S Jensen
Lone Nikolajsen
Source
Cardiol Young. 2014 Oct;24(5):893-9
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Defects, Congenital - surgery
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Sternotomy - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
Chronic pain is common after sternotomy in adults with reported prevalence rates of 20-50%. So far, no studies have examined whether children develop chronic pain after sternotomy.
Postal questionnaires were sent to 171 children 10-60 months after undergoing cardiac surgery via sternotomy at the age of 0-12 years. The children were asked to recall the intensity and duration of their post-operative pain, if necessary with the help from their parents, and to describe the intensity and character of any present pain. Another group of 13 children underwent quantitative sensory testing of the scar area 3 months after sternotomy.
A total of 121 children, median (range) age 7.7 (4.2-16.9) years, answered the questionnaire. Their age at the time of surgery was median (range) 3.8 (0-12.9) years, and the follow-up period was median (range) 4 (0.8-5.1) years. In all, 26 children (21%) reported present pain and/or pain within the last week located in the scar area; in 12 (46%) out of the 26 children, the intensity was =4 on a numeric rating scale (0-10). Quantitative sensory testing of the scar area revealed sensory abnormalities--pinprick hyperalgesia and brush and cold allodynia--in 10 out of 13 children.
Chronic pain after cardiac surgery via sternotomy in children is a problem that should not be neglected. The pain is likely to have a neuropathic component as suggested by the sensory abnormalities demonstrated by quantitative sensory testing.
PubMed ID
24044632 View in PubMed
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[Clinical and morphological aspects of infectious endocarditis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262246
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(7):68-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
T A Fedorova
S Ia Tazina
L V Kakturskii
T D Kanareitseva
V I Burtsev
N I Rusanov
N A Semenenko
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(7):68-73
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods - statistics & numerical data
Echocardiography - methods
Endocarditis, Bacterial - complications - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Heart Failure - etiology - prevention & control
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Analysis
Thromboembolism - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Comparative analysis of anamnestic, clinical, laboratory and instrumental data involved 106 patients with infectious endocarditis treated in S.P. Botkin City Clinical Hospital in 2000-2011 and 92 ones admitted in 1985-1977. The results give evidence of ongoing pathomorphosis of infectious endocarditis as is apparent from the growing number of male patients, increased frequency of primary cases and previous invasive or intravascular manipulations, thromboembolic complications including pulmonary thromboembolism, right heart chamber endocarditis. Over half of the patients are socially unadapted C-peptide level is of diagnostic value for the assessment of inflammation activity, precursors of natriuretic peptide can be used to detect preclinical and clinical stages of cardiac failure related to infectious endocarditis. There is correlation between severity of inflammation and myocardial dysfunction. Early surgical intervention in the absence of effect of combined antibacterial therapy improves prognosis. Morphological studies of inflammation-related changes in myocardium, destruction of cardiomyocytes, dystrophic processes, and fibrosis play an important role in the development of cardiac insufficiency and prognosis of infectious endocarditis.
PubMed ID
25775910 View in PubMed
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70 records – page 1 of 7.