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502 records – page 1 of 51.

20 years of operations on the heart and central vessels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111328
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1967 Apr;14(4):84-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1967

The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
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Acute acalculous cholecystitis in critically ill patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9411
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Sep;48(8):986-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
J. Laurila
H. Syrjälä
P A Laurila
J. Saarnio
T I Ala-Kokko
Author Affiliation
Division of Intensive Care, Department of Anesthesiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. jouko.laurila@pp_fimnet.fi
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Sep;48(8):986-91
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Adult
Aged
Bacterial Infections - complications - microbiology
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cholecystectomy
Cholecystitis - diagnosis - etiology - microbiology
Critical Illness
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Organ Failure - etiology
Norepinephrine - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Palpation
Vasoconstrictor Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a serious complication of critical illness. We evaluated the underlying diseases, clinical and diagnostic features, severity of associated organ failures, and outcome of operatively treated AAC in a mixed ICU patient population. METHODS: The data of all ICU patients who had operatively confirmed AAC during their ICU stay between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2001 were collected from the hospital records and the intensive care unit's data management system for predetermined variables. RESULTS: Thirty-nine (1%) out of 3984 patients underwent open cholecystectomy for AAC during the two-year period. Infection was the most common admission diagnosis, followed by cardiovascular surgery. The mean APACHE II score on admission was 25, and 64% of the patients had three or more failing organs on the day of cholecystectomy. The mean length of ICU stay before cholecystectomy was 8 days, and the mean total length of ICU stay was 19 days. Most patients (85%) received norepinephrine infusion, and 90% suffered respiratory failure before cholecystectomy. Hospital mortality was 44%. The non-survivors had higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores on the day of cholecystectomy compared to the survivors (12.9 vs. 9.5, P = 0.007). CONCLUSION: Acute acalculous cholecystitis was associated with severe illness, infection, long ICU stay, and multiple organ failure. Mortality was related to the degree of organ failure. Prompt diagnosis and active treatment of AAC can be life-saving in these patients.
PubMed ID
15315616 View in PubMed
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Adapting to waiting lists for coronary revascularization. Do Canadian specialists agree on which patients come first?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224256
Source
Chest. 1992 Mar;101(3):715-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
C D Naylor
C M Levinton
R S Baigrie
Author Affiliation
Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Chest. 1992 Mar;101(3):715-22
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology
Coronary Disease - classification - surgery
Data Collection
Emergencies
Humans
Myocardial Revascularization
Ontario
Risk factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To assess specialists' adaptation to long waiting lists for coronary revascularization, and their acceptance of a formal queue-ordering schema proposed by an expert panel.
Mail survey of practitioners in referral centers using 49 hypothetical case scenarios. Scenarios were rated for maximum acceptable delay prior to coronary surgery, on a scale with seven interventional time frames graded from emergency to three to six months' permissible delay. The survey included the proposed schema and rating system; respondents were invited to differ as they saw fit. HYPOTHETICAL PATIENTS: Assumed uniformly to be middle aged with typical angina, but clinical factors varied, eg, severity and stability of angina, response to medical therapy, coronary anatomy, and noninvasive test results. PHYSICIAN SUBJECTS: There were 122 respondents, for a 60 percent response rate, including a majority of cardiac surgeons and invasive cardiologists on staff in Ontario teaching hospitals.
Fifty-seven percent rated some scenarios for acceptable waiting times of three to six months; another 39 percent rated their least urgent scenarios to wait six weeks to three months. Interpractitioner agreement was high: for 48/49 scenarios, at least 75 percent of urgency ratings fell within two contiguous points on the scale. Symptom status was the dominant determinant of waiting time, with mean maximum acceptable wait of 74 days for patients with mild-moderate stable angina but three days for those receiving parenteral nitroglycerin (p less than 0.00001). About half the ratings matched those predicted based on the original panel's consensus criteria; 90 percent were within one scale point.
Specialist practitioners in Ontario have adapted to waiting lists for coronary artery bypass surgery/percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and assess the priority of hypothetical patients in similar ways and in reasonable accord with formal queue-ordering criteria. This behavior may help mitigate the impact of resource constraints, allowing delay of services for those with less acute need--a potential contrast to delayed access in America based on low income or lack of insurance.
PubMed ID
1541137 View in PubMed
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Addressing spouses' unique needs after cardiac surgery when recovery is complicated by heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149887
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Jul-Aug;38(4):284-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susanna Agren
Gunilla Hollman Frisman
Sören Berg
Rolf Svedjeholm
Anna Strömberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Linköping University Hospital and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping S-58185, Sweden. susanna.agren@liu.se
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Jul-Aug;38(4):284-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Empathy
Female
Heart Failure - etiology - nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Professional-Family Relations
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Cardiac surgery places extensive stress on spouses who often are more worried than the patients themselves. Spouses can experience difficult and demanding situations when the partner becomes critically ill.
To identify, describe, and conceptualize the individual needs of spouses of patients with complications of heart failure after cardiac surgery.
Grounded theory using a mix of systematic coding, data analysis, and theoretical sampling was performed. Spouses, 10 women and 3 men between 39 and 85 years, were interviewed.
During analysis, the core category of confirmation was identified as describing the individual needs of the spouses. The core category theoretically binds together three underlying subcategories: security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength. Confirmation facilitated acceptance and improvement of mental and physical health among spouses.
By identifying spouses' needs for security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength, health care professionals can confirm these needs throughout the caring process, from the critical care period and throughout rehabilitation at home. Interventions to confirm spouses' needs are important because they are vital to the patients' recovery.
PubMed ID
19577699 View in PubMed
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Administrative hospitalization database validation of cardiac procedure codes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130676
Source
Med Care. 2013 Apr;51(4):e22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Douglas S Lee
Audra Stitt
Xuesong Wang
Jeffery S Yu
Yana Gurevich
Kori J Kingsbury
Peter C Austin
Jack V Tu
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, ON, Canada M4N3M5. dlee@ices.on.ca
Source
Med Care. 2013 Apr;51(4):e22-6
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - classification
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - surgery
Clinical Coding - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - classification
Coronary Care Units - organization & administration
Databases as Topic
Endovascular Procedures - classification
Forms and Records Control - standards
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Ontario - epidemiology
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Although cardiac procedures are commonly used to treat cardiovascular disease, they are costly. Administrative data sources could be used to track cardiac procedures, but sources of such data have not been validated against clinical registries.
To examine accuracy of cardiac procedure coding in administrative databases versus a prospective clinical registry.
We examined a total of 182,018 common cardiac procedures including percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, valve surgery, and cardiac catheterization procedures during fiscal years 2005 and 2006 across 18 cardiac centers in Ontario, Canada.
Accuracy of codes in the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) administrative databases were compared with the clinical registry of the Cardiac Care Network.
Comparing 17,511 CIHI and 17,404 registry procedures for CABG surgery, the positive predictive value (PPV) of CIHI-coded CABG surgery was 97%. In 6229 CIHI-coded and 5885 registry-coded valve surgery procedures, the PPV of the administrative data source was 96%. Comparing 38,527 PCI procedures in CIHI to 38,601 in the registry, the PPV of CIHI was 94%. Among 119,751 CIHI-coded and 111,725 registry-coded cardiac catheterization procedures, the PPV of administrative data was 94%. When the procedure date window was expanded from the same day to ±1 days, the PPV was 96% (PCI) and exceeded 98% (CABG surgery), 97% (valve surgery), and 95% (cardiac catheterization).
Using a clinical registry as the gold standard, the coding accuracy of common cardiac procedures in the CIHI administrative database was high.
PubMed ID
21979370 View in PubMed
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Advances in cardiac surgical transfusion practices during the 1990s in a Finnish university hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192562
Source
Vox Sang. 2001 Oct;81(3):176-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
L. Capraro
M. Syrjälä
Author Affiliation
Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Kivihaantie 7, FIN-00310 Helsinki, Finland. leena.capraro@bts.redcross.fi
Source
Vox Sang. 2001 Oct;81(3):176-9
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - economics - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Coronary Artery Bypass - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Registries
Abstract
Recent transfusion practices in coronary artery bypass (CABG) operations in a Finnish university hospital were evaluated, utilizing the data stored automatically in hospital registers.
The register-based transfusion data on all 2363 CABG patients operated on during a 2.5-year period, from 1997 to 1999, were analysed and compared with a review of surgical transfusion practices in Finland from 1993 to 1994.
The rate of allogeneic transfusion showed a decrease from 76% in 1993-94 to 48% in the time-period January to June 1999, and the mean number of donor exposures decreased from 3.3 to 2.0 units per patient. The mean blood product purchase costs per patient almost halved from 1993-94 to 1997-99.
Hospital registers provide a good means for prompt evaluation and reporting of large-scale transfusion data. Since 1993, transfusion rates and costs in CABG operations have decreased markedly. Further development of transfusion registers is warranted.
PubMed ID
11703861 View in PubMed
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Advantages and pitfalls of macrostatistics for health planning at the local as well as top national level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204380
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(3):131-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
T T Nielsen
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(3):131-2
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - statistics & numerical data
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Europe
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Scandinavia
United States
Notes
Comment On: Scand Cardiovasc J. 1997;31(6):365-79455787
Comment On: Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(3):183-69764437
PubMed ID
9764426 View in PubMed
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Adverse events and survival with postpericardiotomy syndrome after surgical aortic valve replacement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306778
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2020 Dec; 160(6):1446-1456
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Dec-2020
Author
Joonas Lehto
Jarmo Gunn
Rikhard Björn
Markus Malmberg
K E Juhani Airaksinen
Ville Kytö
Tuomo Nieminen
Juha E K Hartikainen
Fausto Biancari
Tuomas O Kiviniemi
Author Affiliation
Heart Center, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Electronic address: jojuleh@utu.fi.
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2020 Dec; 160(6):1446-1456
Date
Dec-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Valve - diagnostic imaging - surgery
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Heart Valve Diseases - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Postpericardiotomy Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
Postpericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) is a relatively common complication after cardiac surgery. However, long-term follow-up data on the adverse events and mortality of PPS patients requiring invasive interventions are scarce.
We sought to assess the occurrence of mortality, new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular events, and major bleeds in PPS patients requiring medical attention in a combination database of 671 patients who underwent isolated surgical aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis (n = 361) or mechanical prosthesis (n = 310) between 2002 and 2014 (Cardiovascular Research Consortium-A Prospective Project to Identify Biomarkers of Morbidity and Mortality in Cardiovascular Interventional Patients [CAREBANK] 2016-2018). PPS was defined as moderate if it resulted in delayed hospital discharge, readmission, or medical therapy because of the symptoms; and severe if it required interventions for the evacuation of pleural or pericardial effusion.
The overall incidence of PPS was 11.2%. Median time to diagnosis was 16 (interquartile range, 11-36) days. Severe PPS was diagnosed in 3.6% of patients. Severe PPS seemed to be associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio, 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-3.91; P = .040). Moderate or severe PPS increased the risk of new-onset AF during the early postoperative period (hazard ratio, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-2.63; P = .012). No significant associations were found between PPS and cerebrovascular events or major bleeds during the follow-up.
Patients with PPS requiring invasive interventions are at increased risk for mortality unlike those with mild to moderate forms of the disease. PPS requiring medical attention is associated with a higher AF rate during the early postoperative period but has no significant effect on the occurrence of major stroke, stroke or transient ischemic attack, or major bleeds during long-term follow-up.
Notes
CommentIn: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2020 Dec;160(6):1457 PMID 32241613
CommentIn: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2020 Dec;160(6):1458-1459 PMID 32305198
PubMed ID
32107032 View in PubMed
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Age-related changes of cardiac gene expression following myocardial ischemia/reperfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53445
Source
Arch Biochem Biophys. 2003 Dec 15;420(2):268-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2003
Author
Boris Z Simkhovich
Paul Marjoram
Coralie Poizat
Larry Kedes
Robert A Kloner
Author Affiliation
Heart Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital, Department of Medicine and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90017, USA.
Source
Arch Biochem Biophys. 2003 Dec 15;420(2):268-78
Date
Dec-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Apoptosis - genetics
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Comparative Study
Female
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation
Myocardial Ischemia - genetics - metabolism
Myocardial Reperfusion
Myocardial Reperfusion Injury - genetics - metabolism
Myocardium - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Signal Transduction
Transcription, Genetic
Abstract
Young and old (4 and 25 months of age, respectively) Fisher 344/Brown Norway hybrid female rats were subjected to four 3 min episodes of ischemia separated by 5 min of reperfusion. Corresponding open-chest sham-operated groups received 32 min of no intervention. All rats were allowed to recover, and 24h later hearts were removed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Global gene profiling in the ischemic and the non-ischemic areas and in the sham-operated hearts as well was carried out by using Affymetrix Gene Chips. Young ischemic hearts demonstrated down-regulation of gene expression associated with early-remodeling including down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1, decorin, collagen, tropoelastin, and fibulin, as well as decreases in hypertrophy-related transcripts. In contrast, old hearts showed a unique injury-related response, which included up-regulation of mRNAs for proteins associated with hypertrophy or apoptosis (including H36-alpha7 integrin, alpha-actin, tubulin, filamin, connective tissue growth factor, calcineurin, serine protease, and apoptosis inducing factor). These injury-related changes in gene expression could in part explain increased gravity of outcomes of ischemia and myocardial infarction in elderly hearts.
PubMed ID
14654066 View in PubMed
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502 records – page 1 of 51.