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238 records – page 1 of 24.

A 5-y follow-up of the radiation exposure to in-room personnel during cardiac catheterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224582
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Jan;62(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Renaud
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Montreal Heart Institute, Canada.
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Jan;62(1):10-5
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Catheterization
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Personnel, Hospital
Quebec
Radiation Dosage
Thermoluminescent Dosimetry
Abstract
This study documents the radiation doses received by all in-room personnel of three cardiac catheterization laboratories where more than 15,000 cardiac procedures have been performed over a 5-y period. It is shown that all in-room personnel was exposed to a body dose equivalent well below any regulatory limits. However, some workers may have exceeded the occupational 150 mSv y-1 recommended limit for the lens of the eye. The physicians-in-training and the staff physicians are the two groups more likely to reach this limit. It is also demonstrated that a low correlation exists between the annual number of procedures and the annual head dose equivalent of a physician, but more variation is likely to originate from his/her working attitude and techniques. The mean dose equivalent at the collar level of the physicians is estimated to be 0.04 +/- 0.02 mSv per procedure.
PubMed ID
1727405 View in PubMed
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Absence of bias against smokers in access to coronary revascularization after cardiac catheterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176495
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2005 Feb;17(1):37-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Jacques Cornuz
Peter D Faris
P Diane Galbraith
Merril L Knudtson
William A Ghali
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2005 Feb;17(1):37-42
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cardiac Catheterization - utilization
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - utilization
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization - utilization
Prejudice
Prospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Many consider smoking to be a personal choice for which individuals should be held accountable. We assessed whether there is any evidence of bias against smokers in cardiac care decision-making by determining whether smokers were as likely as non-smokers to undergo revascularization procedures after cardiac catheterization.
Prospective cohort study. Subjects and setting. All patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada.
Patients were categorized as current smokers, former smokers, or never smokers, and then compared for their risk-adjusted likelihood of undergoing revascularization procedures (percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting) after cardiac catheterization.
Among 20406 patients undergoing catheterization, 25.4% were current smokers at the time of catheterization, 36.6% were former smokers, and 38.0% had never smoked. When compared with never smokers (reference group), the hazard ratio for undergoing any revascularization procedure after catheterization was 0.98 (95% CI 0.93-1.03) for current smokers and 0.98 (0.94-1.03) for former smokers. The hazard ratio for undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting was 1.09 (1.00-1.19) for current smokers and 1.00 (0.93-1.08) for former smokers. For percutaneous coronary intervention, the hazard ratios were 0.93 (0.87-0.99) for current smokers and 1.00 (0.94-1.06) for former smokers.
Despite potential for discrimination on the basis of smoking status, current and former smokers undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada were as likely to undergo revascularization procedures as catheterization patients who had never smoked.
PubMed ID
15668309 View in PubMed
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The aging Canadian population and hospitalizations for acute myocardial infarction: projection to 2020.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125549
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2012;12:25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Nigel S B Rawson
Rong Chu
Afisi S Ismaila
Jorge Alfonso Ross Terres
Author Affiliation
Medical Affairs, GlaxoSmithKline Inc, 7333 Mississauga Road, Mississauga L5N 6L4, ON, Canada.
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2012;12:25
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiac Catheterization - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Coronary Artery Bypass - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Forecasting
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Length of Stay - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - economics - epidemiology - surgery
Myocardial Revascularization - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Dynamics
Abstract
The risk of experiencing an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) increases with age and Canada's population is aging. The objective of this analysis was to examine trends in the AMI hospitalization rate in Canada between 2002 and 2009 and to estimate the potential increase in the number of AMI hospitalizations over the next decade.
Aggregated data on annual AMI hospitalizations were obtained from the Canadian Institute for Health Information for all provinces and territories, except Quebec, for 2002/03 and 2009/10. Using these data in a Poisson regression model to control for age, gender and year, the rate of AMI hospitalizations was extrapolated between 2010 and 2020. The extrapolated rate and Statistics Canada population projections were used to estimate the number of AMI hospitalizations in 2020.
The rates of AMI hospitalizations by gender and age group showed a decrease between 2002 and 2009 in patients aged = 65 years and relatively stable rates in those aged
Notes
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PubMed ID
22471314 View in PubMed
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Altered health status and quality of life in South Asians with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131706
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Sep;162(3):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Kevin R Bainey
Colleen M Norris
Milan Gupta
Danielle Southern
Diane Galbraith
Merril L Knudtson
Michelle M Graham
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Sep;162(3):501-6
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Cardiac Catheterization
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
People of South Asian (SA) ancestry are susceptible to coronary artery disease (CAD). Although studies suggest that SA with CAD has a worse prognosis compared with Europeans, it is unknown whether corresponding differences in functional status and quality-of-life (QOL) measures exist. Accordingly, we compared symptoms, function, and QOL in SA and European Canadians with CAD using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ).
Using the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease, an outcomes registry that captures patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada, we identified 635 SA and 18,934 European patients with angiographic CAD from January 1995 to December 2006 who reported health status outcomes using the SAQ at 1 year after the index catheterization. To obtain comparable clinical variables among SA and Europeans, we used a propensity score-matching technique.
One-year adjusted mean (SD) scores were significantly lower in SA compared with European Canadians for most SAQ domains: exertional capacity (75 [23] vs 80 [23], P = .011), anginal stability (77 [28] vs 77 [27], P = .627), anginal frequency (86 [23] vs 88 [20], P
PubMed ID
21884867 View in PubMed
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An administrative data merging solution for dealing with missing data in a clinical registry: adaptation from ICD-9 to ICD-10.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159191
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2008;8:1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Danielle A Southern
Colleen M Norris
Hude Quan
Fiona M Shrive
P Diane Galbraith
Karin Humphries
Min Gao
Merril L Knudtson
William A Ghali
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. dasouthe@ucalgary.ca
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2008;8:1
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Algorithms
Cardiac Catheterization - mortality - utilization
Comorbidity
Data Collection
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Medical Records - classification
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Myocardial Ischemia - classification - mortality - therapy
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
We have previously described a method for dealing with missing data in a prospective cardiac registry initiative. The method involves merging registry data to corresponding ICD-9-CM administrative data to fill in missing data 'holes'. Here, we describe the process of translating our data merging solution to ICD-10, and then validating its performance.
A multi-step translation process was undertaken to produce an ICD-10 algorithm, and merging was then implemented to produce complete datasets for 1995-2001 based on the ICD-9-CM coding algorithm, and for 2002-2005 based on the ICD-10 algorithm. We used cardiac registry data for patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in fiscal years 1995-2005. The corresponding administrative data records were coded in ICD-9-CM for 1995-2001 and in ICD-10 for 2002-2005. The resulting datasets were then evaluated for their ability to predict death at one year.
The prevalence of the individual clinical risk factors increased gradually across years. There was, however, no evidence of either an abrupt drop or rise in prevalence of any of the risk factors. The performance of the new data merging model was comparable to that of our previously reported methodology: c-statistic = 0.788 (95% CI 0.775, 0.802) for the ICD-10 model versus c-statistic = 0.784 (95% CI 0.780, 0.790) for the ICD-9-CM model. The two models also exhibited similar goodness-of-fit.
The ICD-10 implementation of our data merging method performs as well as the previously-validated ICD-9-CM method. Such methodological research is an essential prerequisite for research with administrative data now that most health systems are transitioning to ICD-10.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18215293 View in PubMed
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Anatomic suitability for present and next generation transcatheter aortic valve prostheses: evidence for a complementary multidevice approach to treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141436
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Aug;3(8):859-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Hasan Jilaihawi
Raoul Bonan
Anita Asgar
Réda Ibrahim
Tomasz Spyt
Derek Chin
Jan Kovac
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Aug;3(8):859-66
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiography
Aorta - pathology
Aortic Valve - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Stenosis - diagnosis - therapy
Cardiac Catheterization - instrumentation
Echocardiography, Transesophageal
England
Femoral Artery - radiography
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Quebec
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study sought to assess the proportion of patients anatomically suitable for transcatheter aortic valve implantation by multiple access approaches.
The devices currently in mainstream use for transcatheter treatment of severe aortic stenosis are those of Edwards (Edwards Lifesciences, Nyon, Switzerland) and Medtronic CoreValve (M-C) (Luxembourg City, Luxembourg). The range of patients that these can presently treat requires elucidation to guide the necessary evolution of these technologies and increase their scope of therapy.
A consecutive series of patients were assessed with transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography and invasive angiography to assess anatomical suitability by different approaches. The transfemoral access requirements for Edwards and M-C (Edwards currently 22- and 24-F, soon to be 18- and 19-F; M-C 18-F) as well as the aortic valve annular criteria (18 to 25 mm and 20 to 27 mm, respectively) were incorporated in this assessment. Patients unsuitable for the transfemoral approach were considered for Edwards transapical and M-C transaxillary and direct ascending aortic access. Patients suitable for these devices and access approaches were identified.
Data were analyzed for 100 consecutive patients. Edwards suitability was 28% for Edwards-Sapien transfemoral, 78% for Edwards Novaflex transfemoral, and 88% for Edwards-Sapien transapical. Medtronic CoreValve suitability was 84% for transfemoral and 89% using additional transaxillary and direct aortic approaches. Of the 12 patients unsuitable for Edwards-based procedures, 8 were suitable for M-C. Of the 11 patients unsuitable for M-C-based techniques, 8 were suitable for Edwards. Only 3% were anatomically unsuitable for all approaches.
In this series, 97% of patients were anatomically suitable for a complementary approach to treatment.
Notes
Comment In: JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Aug;3(8):867-920723860
PubMed ID
20723859 View in PubMed
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An embolic deflection device for aortic valve interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139209
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Nov;3(11):1133-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Fabian Nietlispach
Namal Wijesinghe
Ronen Gurvitch
Edgar Tay
Jeffrey P Carpenter
Carol Burns
David A Wood
John G Webb
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Nov;3(11):1133-8
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - physiopathology - therapy
Blood pressure
British Columbia
Cardiac Catheterization - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Catheterization
Embolic Protection Devices
Feasibility Studies
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Intracranial Embolism - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prosthesis Design
Radial Artery
Radiography, Interventional
Stroke - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We describe initial human experience with a novel cerebral embolic protection device.
Cerebral emboli are the major cause of procedural stroke during percutaneous aortic valve interventions.
With right radial artery access, the embolic protection device is advanced into the aortic arch. Once deployed a porous membrane shields the brachiocephalic trunk and the left carotid artery deflecting emboli away from the cerebral circulation. Embolic material is not contained or removed by the device. The device was used in 4 patients (mean age 90 years) with severe aortic stenosis undergoing aortic balloon valvuloplasty (n = 1) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (n = 3).
Correct placement of the embolic protection device was achieved without difficulty in all patients. Continuous brachiocephalic and aortic pressure monitoring documented equal pressures without evidence of obstruction to cerebral perfusion. Additional procedural time due to the use of the device was 13 min (interquartile range: 12 to 16 min). There were no procedural complications. Pre-discharge cerebral magnetic resonance imaging found no new defects in any of 3 patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation and a new 5-mm acute cortical infarct in 1 asymptomatic patient after balloon valvuloplasty alone. No patient developed new neurological symptoms or clinical findings of stroke.
Embolic protection during transcatheter aortic valve intervention seems feasible and might have the potential to reduce the risk of cerebral embolism and stroke.
Notes
Comment In: JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 Nov;3(11):1139-4021087749
PubMed ID
21087748 View in PubMed
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An historical cohort study of cardiac catheterization during childhood and the risk of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220620
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1993 Aug;22(4):584-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
J R McLaughlin
N. Kreiger
M P Sloan
L N Benson
S. Hilditch
E A Clarke
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Statistics, Ontario Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1993 Aug;22(4):584-91
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cardiac Catheterization - adverse effects - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
This study aimed to determine whether cancer risk was elevated among patients exposed to radiation from diagnostic cardiac catheterization during childhood. The study cohort included 3915 children who underwent at least one cardiac catheterization at a major children's hospital in Toronto, Canada, between 1950 and 1965, were
PubMed ID
8225729 View in PubMed
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Aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation of the Edwards SAPIEN ™ valve.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120594
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J Suppl. 2013 Feb;47(1):36-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Hans Henrik Møller Nielsen
Henrik Egeblad
Henning Rud Andersen
Leif Thuesen
Steen Hvitfeldt Poulsen
Kaj-Erik Klaaborg
Carl-Johan Jakobsen
Vibeke Elisabeth Hjortdal
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. hhmn@kirurgi.org
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J Suppl. 2013 Feb;47(1):36-41
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Insufficiency - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Stenosis - therapy
Cardiac Catheterization - adverse effects - instrumentation
Denmark - epidemiology
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Prosthesis Design
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is established as an attractive treatment option for high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. One concern is the high risk of prosthetic valve regurgitation. This study aimed to examine for potential preoperative risk factors for postprocedural transcatheter heart valve regurgitation and to quantify the risk, degree, and consequences of postprocedural regurgitation.
100 consecutive patients who underwent femoral (n = 22) or transapical (n = 78) TAVI were retrospectively reviewed. Echocardiographic valve regurgitation and clinical parameters were analyzed over the first year after TAVI.
Seventy-five percent of all patients had prosthetic valve regurgitation. It was, however, only mild or absent in 64% of patients and did not require re-intervention in any of the patients in the series. The severity of the regurgitation appeared unchanged over the one-year follow-up period. Moderate to severe regurgitation was associated with significant yet stable dilatation of the left ventricle over one year and lesser NYHA class improvement three months after TAVI. Asymmetrical native valve calcification increased the risk of paravalvular regurgitation non-significantly.
Transcatheter heart valve regurgitation seems to be mild in the majority of cases and unchanged over a 12 months follow-up period. While affecting left ventricular dimensions in moderate or severe cases, we observed no obvious undesirable consequences of the prosthetic valve regurgitation within the first year.
PubMed ID
22989057 View in PubMed
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238 records – page 1 of 24.