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Active and passive smoking and the risk of stomach cancer, by subsite, in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190831
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2002 Feb;11(1):27-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Y. Mao
J. Hu
R. Semenciw
K. White
Author Affiliation
Surveillance & Risk Assessment, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture AL0601C1, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0L2, Canada. Yang_Mao@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2002 Feb;11(1):27-38
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cardia
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Stomach Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
This study assessed the influence of active and passive smoking on the risk of stomach cancer by subsite. Mailed questionnaires were used to obtain information on 1171 newly diagnosed histologically confirmed stomach cancer cases and 2207 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces. Data were collected on socio-economic status, lifestyle and passive smoking status. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were derived by logistic regression. Compared with those who had never smoked, there was strongly increased risk for ex- and current smokers among subjects with cardial stomach cancer. For men with cardial cancer, the adjusted ORs were 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-3.0) and 2.6 (95% CI 1.6-4.3) for ex-smokers and current smokers, respectively, with a similar pattern among women. Among men, the adjusted ORs were lower for subsites of stomach cancer other than cardia. These findings suggest that active and passive smoking may play an important role in the development of cardial stomach cancer.
PubMed ID
11917206 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and/or gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234796
Source
Cancer. 1987 Sep 1;60(5):1094-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1987
Author
W C MacDonald
J B MacDonald
Source
Cancer. 1987 Sep 1;60(5):1094-8
Date
Sep-1-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Alcohol Drinking
Barrett Esophagus - pathology
Canada - ethnology
Cardia - pathology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Smoking
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
United States - ethnology
Abstract
One hundred twenty-nine adenocarcinomas involving the esophagus and/or gastric cardia differed significantly from 212 cancers of the rest of the stomach as follows: male-female ratio, 6:1 versus 2:1, birth outside Canada, US or UK, 12% versus 34%; parent or sibling with gastric cancer, 5% versus 13%; previous duodenal ulcer, 23% versus 9%; chronic reflux symptoms, 25% versus 3%; hiatal hernia, 51% versus 11%. Of the 129 esophagocardia cancers, 24 involved the esophagus alone, 48 the cardia and esophagus, 33 the cardia alone or cardia and fundus, and 24 the upper stomach and lower esophagus extensively. Thirty-four were associated with Barrett's esophagus. The 72 patients with involvement of both the upper stomach and lower esophagus (48 cardia and esophagus, 24 extensive) were identical with the esophagocardia group as a whole. The 24 patients with esophageal cancer and the 34 with Barrett's epithelium were the same clinically as the whole esophagocardia group except more had chronic reflux and hiatal hernia. The 33 patients with cancer confined to the cardia or cardia and fundus resembled the whole esophagocardia group but did not have Barrett's esophagus. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagocardia region is probably a different disease from cancer of the rest of the stomach.
PubMed ID
3607726 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23435
Source
Surg Oncol. 1995;4(2):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J T Mäkelä
T. Juvonen
S. Laitinen
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Central Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Surg Oncol. 1995;4(2):75-81
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardia - pathology
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Stomach Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Survival Rate
Abstract
One hundred and ninety-five patients operated on for adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia during the years 1961-90 were analysed and the present data indicate that the more enthusiastic attitude adopted towards resective surgery led to a significant increase in operative explorations performed and in resectability rate, from 50% (44/88) and 35% (28/88) during the years 1961-75 to 84% (90/107) and 56% (60/107) during the years 1976-90, respectively. The difference between radical resections, 54% (15/28) and 67% (34/60), remained non-significant. The overall postoperative mortality and morbidity after resective surgery were 14% and 35% and these rates did not rise with time. The anastomotic leakage rate was 15%. Anastomotic leakage was, in fact, not only the most common postoperative complication but also the most common cause of death. Overall cumulative survivals at 1, 3 and 5 years were 47%, 11% and 5%. Comparison of the cumulative survival rates between the 15-year periods indicated that there were no differences in overall survival or in survival after resective surgery. We regard these results disappointing, because over half of the patients died in 1 year and because the long-term survival remained dismal.
PubMed ID
7551262 View in PubMed
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Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16521
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
C. Jansson
N. Plato
A L V Johansson
O. Nyrén
J. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Catarina.Jansson@meb.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Cardia
Epidemiologic Methods
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. METHODS: In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. CONCLUSIONS: Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or cardia adenocarcinoma and are unlikely to contribute to the increasing incidence or the male predominance.
PubMed ID
16421388 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, smoking and risk of gastric cancer: case-control study from Moscow, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198346
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Apr;11(4):363-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
D. Zaridze
E. Borisova
D. Maximovitch
V. Chkhikvadze
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Carcinogenesis, Russian Cancer Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Apr;11(4):363-71
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Adenosquamous - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Cardia
Case-Control Studies
Female
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To examine the risk of gastric cancer associated with alcohol consumption and smoking in men and women in Moscow, Russia.
A case-control study which includes 448 cases and 610 controls was conducted. Cases consisted of patients with newly diagnosed histologically confirmed gastric cancer. Controls were patients admitted during the study period to the hospital with diagnoses other than cancer and/or gastrointestinal diseases. Information on demographic variables, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet was collected from all subjects. Venous blood was drawn from 361 cases and 441 controls. A serological test for Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G was performed.
Alcohol consumption, particularly vodka consumption, was found to increase the risk of gastric cancer. In men the effect of hard liquor drinking was stronger for cancer of the cardia (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.2-10.2), while in women the effect was stronger for cancer of sites other than gastric cardia (OR = 1.5, CI = 1.0-2.3). Smoking increased the risk of developing gastric cancer in men, but not in women. In men a dose-response relationship between mean number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = 0.03), pack-years of cigarettes smoked (p = 0.01) and duration of smoking (p = 0.08) and the risk of cancer of gastric cardia was observed. Further statistical analysis revealed interactions between effect of smoking and alcohol consumption and between smoking and H. pylori infection status.
The findings further support the role of alcohol consumption and smoking in the etiology of gastric cancer.
PubMed ID
10843447 View in PubMed
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Antioxidants and cancers of the esophagus and gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20316
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2000
Author
P. Terry
J. Lagergren
W. Ye
O. Nyrén
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. paul.terry@mep.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Date
Sep-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cardia - drug effects - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Drug Synergism
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
Antioxidant vitamins have attracted considerable attention in previous studies of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, but dietary studies of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia remain sparse. Treating these tumors as distinct diseases, we studied intakes of vitamin C, beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol in a nationwide population-based case-control study in Sweden, with 185, 165, and 258 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, respectively, and 815 controls. Subjects with a high parallel intake of vitamin C, beta-carotene, and alpha-tocopherol showed a 40-50% decreased risk of both histological types of esophageal cancer compared with subjects with a low parallel intake. Antioxidant intake was not associated with the risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Separately, vitamin C and beta-carotene reduced the risk of esophageal cancers more than alpha-tocopherol. We found that antioxidant intake is associated with similar risk reductions for both main histological types of esophageal cancer. Our findings indicate that antioxidants do not explain the diverging incidence rates of the 2 histological types of esophageal cancer. Moreover, our data suggest that inverse associations with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma may be stronger among subjects under presumed higher oxidative stress due to smoking or gastroesophageal reflux, respectively. Our results may be relevant for the implementation of focused, cost-effective preventive measures.
PubMed ID
10925371 View in PubMed
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Aspirin protects against gastric cancer: results of a case-control study from Moscow, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201509
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Aug 12;82(4):473-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-1999
Author
D. Zaridze
E. Borisova
D. Maximovitch
V. Chkhikvadze
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Carcinogenesis, Cancer Research Centre, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Int J Cancer. 1999 Aug 12;82(4):473-6
Date
Aug-12-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - microbiology
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage
Aspirin - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Adenosquamous - epidemiology - microbiology
Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell - epidemiology - microbiology
Cardia
Case-Control Studies
Female
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Abstract
A case-control study of stomach cancer which includes 448 cases and 610 hospital controls has been conducted in Moscow, Russia. Information on life-style habits, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, diet, medical history and use of different medications including aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was collected using a self-administered structured questionnaire. Venous blood was drawn from 361 cases and 441 controls. A serological test for Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G was performed to detect infected individuals. Use of aspirin and other NSAIDs was associated with protection against cancer of the stomach (OR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.41-0.90). Analysis by subsite revealed that aspirin did not affect the risk of cancer of the gastric cardia but had a protective effect for non-cardia gastric cancer. The OR associated with use of aspirin adjusted for age and education for both sexes combined was 0.49 (95% CI 0.31-0.77). A decrease in relative risk was statistically significant for men (OR = 0.48, 95% CI 0.25-0.92) and women (OR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.28-0.97). Controlling for major risk factors did not attenuate the reduction in risk. The observed associations were also present in individuals who were H. pylori immunoglobulin G-positive. There was no reduction in risk associated with aspirin and/or non-aspirin NSAIDs among non-infected subjects.
PubMed ID
10404057 View in PubMed
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Association between body mass and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20972
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1999 Jun 1;130(11):883-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1999
Author
J. Lagergren
R. Bergström
O. Nyrén
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Jesper.Lagergren@mep.ki.se
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1999 Jun 1;130(11):883-90
Date
Jun-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - etiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Bias (epidemiology)
Body mass index
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - etiology
Cardia
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Esophageal Neoplasms - etiology
Female
Humans
Interviews
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stomach Neoplasms - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The incidence of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma is, for unknown reasons, increasing dramatically. A weak and inconsistent association between body mass index (BMI) and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia has been reported. OBJECTIVE: To reexamine the association between BMI and development of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia. DESIGN: Nationwide, population-based case-control study. SETTING: Sweden, 1995 through 1997. PATIENTS: Patients younger than 80 years of age who had recently received a diagnosis were eligible. Comprehensive organization ensured rapid case ascertainment. Controls were randomly selected from the continuously updated population register. Interviews were conducted with 189 patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and 262 patients with adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia; for comparison, 167 patients with incident esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and 820 controls were also interviewed. MEASUREMENTS: Odds ratios were determined from BMI and cancer case-control status. Odds ratios estimated the relative risk for the two adenocarcinomas studied and were calculated by multivariate logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: A strong dose-dependent relation existed between BMI and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The adjusted odds ratio was 7.6 (95% CI, 3.8 to 15.2) among persons in the highest BMI quartile compared with persons in the lowest. Obese persons (persons with a BMI > 30 kg/m2) had an odds ratio of 16.2 (CI, 6.3 to 41.4) compared with the leanest persons (persons with a BMI
PubMed ID
10375336 View in PubMed
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Association between medications that relax the lower esophageal sphincter and risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10421
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2000 Aug 1;133(3):165-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2000
Author
J. Lagergren
R. Bergström
H O Adami
O. Nyrén
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet and Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. jesper.lagergren@mep.ki.se
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2000 Aug 1;133(3):165-75
Date
Aug-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - etiology
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - adverse effects
Aminophylline - adverse effects
Benzodiazepines - adverse effects
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - etiology
Cardia
Case-Control Studies
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Esophageal Neoplasms - etiology
Esophagogastric Junction - drug effects
Gastroesophageal Reflux - chemically induced - complications
Humans
Interviews
Male
Nitroglycerin - adverse effects
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - etiology
Vasodilator Agents - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is increasing rapidly. Gastroesophageal reflux is a strong risk factor for this disease. The increase in incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma coincided with the introduction of medications that promote reflux by relaxing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), such as nitroglycerin, anticholinergics, beta-adrenergic agonists, aminophyllines, and benzodiazepines. OBJECTIVE: To test the possible association between use of LES-relaxing medications and risk for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia. DESIGN: A nationwide population-based case-control study with in-person interviews. SETTING: Sweden, 1995 through 1997. PATIENTS: 189 patients with newly diagnosed esophageal adenocarcinoma, 262 with adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia, and 167 with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma were compared with 820 population-based controls. MEASUREMENTS: Estimated incidence rate ratios, calculated by using multivariate logistic regression from case-control data with adjustment for potential confounding. RESULTS: Past use of LES-relaxing drugs was positively associated with risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma. Among daily, long-term users (>5 years) of LES-relaxing drugs, the estimated incidence rate ratio was 3.8 (95% CI, 2.2 to 6.4) compared with persons who had never used these drugs. Drugs of all classes contributed to the increased risk, but the association was particularly strong for anticholinergics. Short-term use of other types of LES-relaxing drugs did not seem to be strongly associated with risk. The association almost disappeared after adjustment for reflux symptoms, indicating that promotion of reflux is the link between use of LES-relaxing drugs and esophageal adenocarcinoma. If 15,490 men in any age group take LES-relaxing drugs daily for 5 years, 1 additional case of adenocarcinoma would be expected (number needed to treat for harm); in men older than 60 years of age, the number needed to treat for harm is 5,570. Assuming a causal relation, about 10% of the esophageal adenocarcinomas occurring in the population may be attributable to intake of LES-relaxing drugs. Cardia adenocarcinoma and esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma were not associated with use of LES-relaxing drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The widespread use of LES-relaxing drugs may have contributed to the increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 2000 Aug 1;133(3):227-910906839
PubMed ID
10906830 View in PubMed
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[Cancer in esophagus and cardia--incidence trends in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86597
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Apr 21;170(17):1460-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-2008
Author
Gregersen Lea Haarup
Friis Søren
Olsen Jørgen H
Author Affiliation
Kraeftens Bekaempelse, Institut for Epidemiologisk Kraeftforskning, DK-2100 København Ø.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Apr 21;170(17):1460-4
Date
Apr-21-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Cardia
Denmark - epidemiology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The incidence of adenocarcinoma in esophagus and cardia has been reported as increasing in a number of countries over recent decades. We examined if a similar increase has occurred in Denmark. The study evaluates the incidence trends for esophagus- and stomach cancer in the period 1943-2003 with focus on changes since 1978. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All data were retrieved from the Danish Cancer Register, which contains information on cancer cases in Denmark since 1943, including detailed information about histology since 1978. Age-standardized incidence rates were calculated based on the age distribution in the World Standard Population (WSP) and the Danish population in 2000 (DK-2000). RESULTS: The age-standardized (DK-2000) incidence rates for esophagus cancer in Denmark were stable in the period 1943-1977, but then increased from 3.7 per 100,000 in the period 1978-1982 to 6.8 per 100,000 in the period 1998-2003. The corresponding incidence rate for stomach cancer decreased over the entire study period from 21.9 per 100,000 in 1943-1947 to 9.7 per 100,000 in 1998-2003. The increased incidence of esophagus cancer in the period from 1978 was mainly due to an increase in the incidence of adenocarcinomas, particularly among men. During the period 1978-2003 we observed a marked decrease in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in the distal stomach, whereas the incidence of adenocarcinoma in the cardia was constant in this period. CONCLUSION: The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased during the past 25 years in Denmark, whereas the incidence of adenocarcinoma in the cardia has remained constant.
PubMed ID
18462626 View in PubMed
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68 records – page 1 of 7.