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Investigation and management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in Canadian Inuit: enhancing access to care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4093
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:117-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B. Martin
W. Smith
P. Orr
F. Guijon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:117-21
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic regions - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma in Situ - ethnology - prevention & control
Colposcopy
Delivery of Health Care
Electrosurgery
Female
Humans
Inuits
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is a major cause of morbidity among Circumpolar women. Cervical cancer comprised 15% of all cancers in Canadian Inuit women from 1969-1988. The age standardized incidence for invasive cervical cancer in Canadian Inuit women is 3.1 times the rate in the general Canadian population. Management of CIN in women of remote Arctic regions has traditionally required multiple visits to specialized medical centres for diagnosis, therapy and follow-up. Such centralized care requires separation of women from their families, resulting in significant medical, emotional and economic costs for the patient, her family and community. In the Canadian Central Arctic, a program for the diagnosis and therapy of CIN has been established using colposcopy with loop electrosurgery, performed by a trained local family practitioner and visiting gynecologist. Early program evaluation has indicated reduction in medical expenditures due to travel costs, minimal procedure-related morbidity and discomfort, and improved patient satisfaction associated with reduced separation from family and community. It is hoped that the program design, which harnesses technology in order to provide improved care closer to home, will be applicable to other Circumpolar regions.
PubMed ID
7639897 View in PubMed
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