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386 records – page 1 of 39.

40-year trends in skin cancer in British Columbia, Canada, 1973 to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125127
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
David I McLean
Norm Phillips
Youwen Zhou
Richard Gallagher
Tim K Lee
Author Affiliation
Prevention Programs and Cancer Control Research, BC Cancer Agency, BC. david.mclean@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Skin cancer is common in North America. Incidence rate trends are potentially important in the assessment of the effects of measures to increase sun awareness in the population as well as measures to reduce sun damage.
To determine the incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in a geographically defined Canadian population over a 40-year period.
Data were obtained from the BC Cancer Registry for the calendar years 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003.
Age-standardized incidence rates increased significantly from 1973 to 2003 for BCC, SCC, and CMM.
The ethnic makeup of British Columbia has changed over time, and a novel method of accounting for the effect of this on skin cancer rates is presented.
The incidence rate for skin cancers continued to rise in British Columbia, but there appears to have been a decline in the incidence of CMM and BCC in the youngest cohorts.
PubMed ID
22513059 View in PubMed
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Actinic Keratosis Diagnosis and Increased Risk of Developing Skin Cancer: A 10-year Cohort Study of 17,651 Patients in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311024
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2020 Apr 29; 100(8):adv00128
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-29-2020
Author
Ghassan Guorgis
Chris D Anderson
Johan Lyth
Magnus Falk
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2020 Apr 29; 100(8):adv00128
Date
Apr-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Keratosis, Actinic - diagnosis
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Actinic keratosis is the most common actinic lesion in fair-skinned populations. It is accepted as an indicator of actinic skin damage and as an occasional precursor of squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate, in a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of actinic keratosis, the relative risk of developing skin cancer during a follow-up period of 10 years. This registry-based cohort study compared a cohort of 2,893 individuals in south-eastern Sweden, who were diagnosed with actinic keratosis during the period 2000 to 2004, with a matched-control cohort of 14,668 individuals without actinic keratosis during the same inclusion period. The subjects were followed for 10 years to identify skin cancer development in both cohorts. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used as risk measures. Individuals in the actinic keratosis cohort had a markedly higher risk for all skin cancer forms compared with the control cohort (hazard ratio (HR) 5.1, 95% CI 4.7-5.6). The relative risk was highest for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (HR 7.7, 95% CI 6.7-8.8) and somewhat lower for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (HR 4.4, 95% CI 4.1-5.0) and malignant melanoma (MM) (HR 2.7 (2.1-3.6). Patients with a diagnosis of actinic keratosis were found to be at increased risk of developing SCC, BCC and MM in the 10 years following diagnosis of actinic keratosis. In conclusion, a diagnosis of actinic keratosis, even in the absence of documentation of other features of chronic sun exposure, is a marker of increased risk of skin cancer, which should be addressed with individually directed preventive advice.
PubMed ID
32314794 View in PubMed
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Age-incidence relationships and time trends in cervical cancer in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19381
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(4):323-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
K. Hemminki
X. Li
P. Mutanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(4):323-8
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Age-incidence relationships are informative of carcinogenic mechanisms. These have been previously assessed for cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) but not for adenocarcinoma. The aim was to assess by means of age-, period- and cohort-specific analyses and Poisson regression modelling whether the two types of cervical cancer show an age-incidence maximum at a relatively young age, as shown in cross-sectional analyses. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to analyse age-incidence relationships in cervical SCC and adenocarcinoma diagnosed in years 1958-1996, including a total of 15,118 and 1866 cases, respectively. Area of residence and socio-economic status were included in analyses because they were risk factors of cervical cancer. The analysis of cervical SCC confirmed an incidence maximum at ages 35-39 years. The data for adenocarcinoma also suggested a similar early age maximum but the curves differed extensively by birth cohort. The incidence of adenocarcinoma increased substantially at young age groups towards the end of follow-up. Endometrial adenocarcinoma and vaginal and vulvar SCC, which share some risk factors with cervical cancer, did not show an early age incidence maximum. The results also showed that there was a decrease in the incidence of cervical SCC around year 1960, almost 10 years before the organized population screening, probably due to introduced opportunistic pap testing. The benefits of the organized screening were observed as a further decline in the incidence rates. The unique age-incidence relationships in cervical cancer call for biological explanations.
PubMed ID
11767957 View in PubMed
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Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16521
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
C. Jansson
N. Plato
A L V Johansson
O. Nyrén
J. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Catarina.Jansson@meb.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Cardia
Epidemiologic Methods
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. METHODS: In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. CONCLUSIONS: Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or cardia adenocarcinoma and are unlikely to contribute to the increasing incidence or the male predominance.
PubMed ID
16421388 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and cancer of the upper digestive tract. Treating upper digestive tract cancers as a single entity may be misleading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10676
Source
BMJ. 1999 May 8;318(7193):1291
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-1999
Author
R. Fitzgerald
C. Caygill
Source
BMJ. 1999 May 8;318(7193):1291
Date
May-8-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Barrett Esophagus - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Notes
Comment On: BMJ. 1998 Sep 26;317(7162):844-79748175
PubMed ID
10391708 View in PubMed
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Anal cancer in Alaska; a retrospective study of incidence, treatment, and outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3924
Source
Alaska Med. 2002 Jul-Sep;44(3):56-9, 62
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jeffrey A Wilt
June M George
Richard T Chung
Rodney L Cook
James E O'Malley
Author Affiliation
jwilt@provak.org
Source
Alaska Med. 2002 Jul-Sep;44(3):56-9, 62
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Anal cancer is a rare tumor usually of squamous histology that is managed most often with concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Surgery is commonly reserved for those who fail primary treatment. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients with anal cancer seen in two radiation therapy centers in Alaska from the period of 1996 to mid-2001. Records were reviewed for diagnosis, sex, age, staging, treatment and outcomes. Twenty-four patients were identified with squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. Average age at diagnosis was 53. Tumor size was predominantly 2-5 centimeters. Four patients had nodal involvement and three had distant metastasis. Twenty patients received radiation. Nineteen received flourouracil and either cisplatin or mitomycin. Three patients underwent abdominoperineal resections. Ten were found to have no evidence of disease at an average of twenty-two months. These results are consistent with findings of larger studies elsewhere.
PubMed ID
12497665 View in PubMed
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[Anal cancer in Iceland 1987-2003. A population based study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82038
Source
Laeknabladid. 2006 May;92(5):365-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Vietharsdóttir Halla
Moeller Páll Helgi
Jóhannsson Jakob
Jónasson Jón Gunnlaugur
Author Affiliation
Department of surgery, Iceland University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2006 May;92(5):365-72
Date
May-2006
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Aged
Anus Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Carcinoma - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Adenosquamous - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Defecation
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasm Staging
Pain - etiology
Pruritus - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Anal cancer is a rare disease. The aim of this study was to describe anal cancer in Iceland in 1987-2003 with respect to incidence, histologic type, treatment, recurrence rate and survival. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study in which all malignant anal tumours diagnosed in Iceland in the period 1987-2003 were reviewed with respect to patient outcome. Information was obtained from hospitals registers. All histological material was reviewed by a consultant histopathologist (JGJ). This is a nationwide, population-based study of malignant tumours of the anal region. RESULTS: From 1987-2003 thirty-eight patients were diagnosed with anal cancer, 28 females and 10 males. The average age at diagnosis was 63.4 years. Age standardized incidence rates for anal cancer in Iceland were 0.3 (+/-0.2) of 100.000 males and 0.9 (+/-0.4) of 100.000 females. Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (n=30). The remaining histologic types were malignant melanoma (n=3), adenosquamous carcinoma (n=1), adenocarcinoma (n=1), GIST (n=1) and undifferentiated carcinoma (n=2). The most common symptoms were rectal bleeding (n=27), mass lesion (n=28), pain (n=19) and pruritus (n=4). Most patients had more than one symptom. The duration of symptoms before diagnosis ranged from 2 weeks to 96 months (mean value 3.5 months). Treatment modalities used were chemotherapy (n=12), radiotherapy (n=25) and local excision (n=18) and/or APR (n=5). One patient received no treatment. Many patients were treated with more than one treatment modality (n=18). Twelve patients had recurrent cancer. The mean value of the time from diagnosis of the primary to the recurrent cancer was 15.6 months (range, 5.9-117). Sixteen patients remain with disease and ten have died of anal cancer. The five year survival rate for patients diagnosed in the years 1987 to 1998 is 75% but cancer-specific survival is 82%. CONCLUSION: Age-standardized incidence for anal cancer in Iceland is similar to other regions. Average age at diagnosis, male-female ratio and prognosis is similar to reports in other studies. The proportion of adenocarcinoma of the anus is lower in Iceland than elsewhere.
PubMed ID
16741319 View in PubMed
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Anal carcinoma in inflammatory bowel disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20363
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Jul;83(1):89-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
M. Frisch
C. Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Jul;83(1):89-90
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology
Risk
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
We followed 9602 patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis for anal squamous cell carcinoma for up to 18 years. No significant increase was observed: two cases occurred vs 1.3 expected during 99,229 person-years of observation, (standardized incidence ratio = 1.6; 95 confidence interval: 0.2-5.7). Anal squamous cell carcinoma is rare even in inflammatory bowel disease.
PubMed ID
10883673 View in PubMed
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386 records – page 1 of 39.