Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Lung cancer guidelines in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland: a comparison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289475
Source
Acta Oncol. 2017 Jul; 56(7):943-948
Publication Type
Case Reports
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Niels Lyhne Christensen
Antti Jekunen
Sebastian Heinonen
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Torben Riis Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
a Department of Documentation and Quality , Danish Cancer Society , Copenhagen Ø , Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2017 Jul; 56(7):943-948
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Prognosis
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The Nordic countries are similar in terms of demographics and health care organization. Yet there are marked differences in lung cancer mortality, for which Denmark historically has had the poorest outcome. One of several possible reasons for these differences could have to do with how lung cancer is diagnosed and treated in the different Nordic countries. However, among the four most populous Nordic countries: Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland, there is a paucity of knowledge about differences and similarities in recommendations in the national guidelines for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the methodology by which the guidelines are developed.
We identified and evaluated the development and content of the available clinical care guidelines for NSCLC in the four countries. Moreover, we compared the integrated cancer pathways in these countries. We have used case examples to illustrate areas with clear differences in clinical care recommendations.
There are notable differences in the methodology by which the guidelines are developed, published and updated to comply with international recommendations. The Norwegian guidelines are developed and updated according to the most rigorous methodology and have so far been updated most frequently. We found that on the basis of recommendations patients with NSCLC are treated differently with regard to bevacizumab therapy and radiation dosing regimens. Cerebral imaging practices in patients with locally advanced NSCLC also differ. There is, moreover, a marked difference with regard to efforts to help patients to quit smoking. All except Finland have integrated cancer pathways for fast track diagnosis and treatment. Guidelines for follow-up of lung cancer patients also differ, with the Danish follow-up regimen as the most comprehensive. To obtain consensus on optimal clinical care, areas with differences in recommendations or where recommendations are based on a low level of evidence should be subjected to further studies.
PubMed ID
28418710 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lung cancer guidelines in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland: a comparison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289633
Source
Acta Oncol. 2017 Jul; 56(7):943-948
Publication Type
Case Reports
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Niels Lyhne Christensen
Antti Jekunen
Sebastian Heinonen
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Torben Riis Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
a Department of Documentation and Quality , Danish Cancer Society , Copenhagen Ø , Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2017 Jul; 56(7):943-948
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Prognosis
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The Nordic countries are similar in terms of demographics and health care organization. Yet there are marked differences in lung cancer mortality, for which Denmark historically has had the poorest outcome. One of several possible reasons for these differences could have to do with how lung cancer is diagnosed and treated in the different Nordic countries. However, among the four most populous Nordic countries: Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland, there is a paucity of knowledge about differences and similarities in recommendations in the national guidelines for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the methodology by which the guidelines are developed.
We identified and evaluated the development and content of the available clinical care guidelines for NSCLC in the four countries. Moreover, we compared the integrated cancer pathways in these countries. We have used case examples to illustrate areas with clear differences in clinical care recommendations.
There are notable differences in the methodology by which the guidelines are developed, published and updated to comply with international recommendations. The Norwegian guidelines are developed and updated according to the most rigorous methodology and have so far been updated most frequently. We found that on the basis of recommendations patients with NSCLC are treated differently with regard to bevacizumab therapy and radiation dosing regimens. Cerebral imaging practices in patients with locally advanced NSCLC also differ. There is, moreover, a marked difference with regard to efforts to help patients to quit smoking. All except Finland have integrated cancer pathways for fast track diagnosis and treatment. Guidelines for follow-up of lung cancer patients also differ, with the Danish follow-up regimen as the most comprehensive. To obtain consensus on optimal clinical care, areas with differences in recommendations or where recommendations are based on a low level of evidence should be subjected to further studies.
PubMed ID
28418710 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lung cancer in women compared with men: stage, treatment, and survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204075
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 1998 Oct;66(4):1140-3; discussion 1143-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
D. Ouellette
G. Desbiens
C. Emond
G. Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 1998 Oct;66(4):1140-3; discussion 1143-4
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Carcinoma, Small Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Proportional Hazards Models
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
In cardiac disease there appears to be a difference in the treatment of men and women, and thus an advantage in survival in men. This study aimed to determine whether these differences exist in lung cancer.
We undertook a retrospective cohort study in a university hospital. The study population consisted of 104 consecutive women and 104 consecutive men with newly diagnosed lung cancer between March 1988 and June 1990. The following information was collected: sex, age, presenting symptoms, investigations, histology, stage, treatment, and survival.
The location of the tumor, presenting symptoms, investigations, and stages were similar in men and women. There was a difference in the distribution of the various histologic types of lung cancer: Small cell lung cancer was more frequent in women (25% versus 11.5% in men) and squamous cell carcinoma more frequent in men (38% in women versus 51% in men). The overall survival was similar among the two sexes, but there was a survival advantage in women when adjusted for stage.
There was a higher incidence of small cell carcinoma in women and squamous cell carcinoma in men. There was evidence of a difference in the survival rate of lung cancer in favor of women according to stage.
PubMed ID
9800795 View in PubMed
Less detail